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October 03, 1979 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-10-03

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The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, October 3, 1979-Page 3

Nature 1
Storm halts trans-U.S.

Jains
balloon flight

,AhlhAl-.AAh,

I

th :sd facItory

737 N. Huron
(at Lowell; just ,E. of EMU .Campus)

(AP) - The hopes of four balloonists
for a successful non-stop, trans-
Amnerica flight ended early yesterday
when a severe thunderstorm forced
them to scuttle their balloon and gon-
dola in a soybean field.
The flight of the giant helium-filled
balloon - DaVinci Trans-America -
ended abruptly after it was pelted by
rain, snow and ice and threatened by
lightning, said pilot Rudolph
Engelmann of Boulder, Colo.
CHIEF PILOT Vera Simons, of Mc-
Clean, Va., broke a leg during the lan-
ding. She underwent surgery and was
reported in fair condition at St. Rita's
Medical Center in nearby Lima.
Engelmann, along with Fred Hyde,
an-eye surgeon from Prairie Village,
Kan., and NBC-TV cameraman Randy
Birch, suffered only bruises.
A successful flight had appeared cer-
tain for the DaVinci and its four adven-

turers. It was only four hours from sur-
passing the current endurance record
for a helium-filled balloon of 139 hours,
six minutes. It was less than 24 hours
from completing the first non-stop
trans-continental balloon flight - the
goal the crew set when lifting off from
Tillamook, Ore., 2,500 miles to the west,
last Wednesday.
"I'M NOT SURE I want to recreate
it," said Engelmann, at the Allen Coun-
ty airport early yesterday before being
flown to Chicago for a national
television appearance.
"It was a fluke storm. Completely
unexpected," he said. "We had just
outrun severe squall lines associated
with tornadoes out of Indiana and
Illinois."
Just when they were beginning to
breathe a sigh of relief, the crew mem-
bers were surprised by a severe thun-

derstorm near the western border of
Ohio.
"We were at 14,000 feet, really clip-
ping along. But the snow and ice added
considerably to our weight and we
didn't have enough ballast to compen-
sate for the additional weight. That's
when we had to put down," Engelmann
continued.
The crew chose a very dark area for
their landing and "hoped there weren't
any power lines or houses or people in
the way," he said.
"It's like riding on a carpet," a bear-
ded and weary Birch said of the trip,
adding he was extremely disappointed
that the flight was aborted.
"We're all a little disappointed," said'
Engelmann. "But the spirit will come
back."
But at the medical center, as he
waited for word on Simons, Hyde, the,
navigator and radio operator, said he

would not attempt a similar journey.
"There are just too many variables in
the weather," he said, the look of defeat
clearly etched in his face. A small red
bruise was above his left eye.
Hyde's attention was focused on the
hospital television. The disappointment
in his face deepened as a weather
forecast appeared. From Ohio to the
East Coast the report was of clear
skies. "We would have- made it," he
muttered to no one in particular.
Meanwhile, the 10-foot-high gondola
of the DaVinci lay on its side on a mud-
dy lane between two soybean fields
owned by Joy Dawson. It did not appear
badly damaged and was guarded by
sheriff's deputies until it could be
moved.
The 216,000-cubic-foot balloon, which
expanded to nearly 80 feet in diameter
when inflated, stretched across 100 feet
of farmland.I

TONIGHT LIVE BAND
TILT
don't miss them
$1 cover with college ID
drink specials

Study shows that public dislikes
~overnment s handling of elderly

The Ann Arbor Film Cooperatv Presents at Aud A:
Wednesday, October 3 $1.50
BIG DEAL OF MADONNA STREET
(Mario Monicelli, 1960) 7 only-AUD A
One of the funniest movies ever and a staple of the art-house circuit. A
classic spoof of the "perfect crime" genre, as a gang of supreme bunglers
attempt to knock off an extremely small-time safe. A charmer. See it and do
yourself a favor. MARCELLO MASTROIANNI, VITTORiIO GASSMAN, CLAUDIA
CARDINALE, TOTO. RICHARD I I I
(Laurence Oivier, 1956) 8:45 only--AUD A
Olivier uses visual images of crowns, shadows, and religious symbols to
transform the Shakespearean stageplay into an outstanding film. Making major
and controversial alterations in the text, Olivier focuses on the strange char-
acter of Richard-a man both charming and sinister: "A delicate ironic
balance is maintained between condemning Richard as a tyrant and loving
him for it, which reflects the human ambivalence towards tyrants and, by
extension, the intrinsic ambivalence of tyrants themselves."-C. Brown, FILM
QUARTERLY.-Besides LORD OLIVIER as Richard, the stellar British cast includes
CLAIRE BLOOM, SIR CEDRIC HARDWICKE, SIR RALPH RICHARDSON, and SIR
JOHN GIELGUD. Music by Sir William Walton. Prize winner at Berlin and
Edinburgh Film Festivals.
Tomorrow: DeSIca's BICYCLE THIEF AND A BRIEF VACATION at NAT. SC.
NOTE: Free preview screening of 'TIL MARRIAGE DO US
PART with Laura Antonelli. FREE. Aud. A; Wed., Oct. 3rd, 4:00.

By BETH ROSENBERG
American support for public institu-
ions is declining, especially among the
Iderly, according to a two-year study
:ornpleted this month by the Univer-
sity's Institute for Gerontology.
The project, "American Values in the
Iderly," studied a. variety of issues in-
huding their affect on legislation for
he elderly.
The project, "American Values in the
lderly, studied a variety of issues in-
huding American values and their af-
ect on legislation for the elderly.
Public opinion surveys and election
tudies from the University's Institute
or .Social Research were some of the
esearch tools used in the project.

PROJECT COORDINATOR and
Gerontologist Jane McClure said many
opinion studies find sentiment against
the social security system, thus leaving
care of the elderly up to the private sec-
tor.
"Public opinion surveys show
Americans are losing confidence in the
government and should leave the social
security problem up to pensions and
personal savings," McClure explained.
The study may also show that the
government has overstepped its bounds
in the field of social policy, said John
Tropman, a project researcher from
the School of Social Work. -
"THAT MAY IMPLY the gover-
nment should be more of an enabler
than a doer," Tropman said.
Researchers also found a discrepan-

cy between perception and reality
regarding the elderly. McClure said she
found people perceive aging as being
worse than the elderly say it is.
Negative stereotypes, she said, are
found in people of all ages, but Trop-
man added that this view is not based
on real-life experiences.
ANOTHER SECTION of the study
showed evidence that the ideal family
size in'the United States has gone down
in recent years. While the elderly also
favored declining numbers of family
members, they still supported larger
families than their younger counterpar-
ts.
The inter-disciplinary study com-
bined the expertise of Tropman and
McClure, as well as retired Sociology
Prof. Henry Meyer; Wilbur Cohen and
Terrence Tice, both of the School of
Education; and Andrew Achenbaum,,a
historian at Canisius College in Buffalo.
N.Y.
The University's student loan fund
assets reached a new high of $46 million
in 1977-78.
LADIES NIGHT
at
Second Chance
995-5350

ENERGY.
We can't
afford to
waste it.

I

Kucinich survives
(Cleveland primary

1

CLEVELAND (AP) - Dennis
ucinich, the feisty 32-year-old mayor
ho barely survived a recall attempt
last year, stayed alive politically last
night by clinging to second place in a
primnary to select two candidates for
mayor in Ohio's largest city.
But Lt. Gov. George Voinovich
showed he was the man to beat in the
Nov. 6 runoff by placing first. Three of
five contenders for the $50,000-a-year
job as mayor of the financiaUy troubled

1 'I

city were eliminted in the non-partisan
primary.
'I want to remind you that an elec-
tion is like a-football game," Kucinich
told supporters. "We are trailing at the
end of the half but what counts is being
ahead when the game is over," he said.
"We are the underdogs not only to the
Republicans but to the money powers
who are using a cardboard candidate to
try to take control of our .city," said
Kucinich, a Democrat.

FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Big Deal on Madonna Street, 7 p.m., Richard
ICI, 8:45 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Cinema Guild-How I Won the War, 7,9:05 p.m., Old Arch Aud.
SPEAKERS
CRLT-W. J. McKeachie, "Constructing Tests," 3:10 p.m., 2417 Mason
Hall.
College of Engineering-Environmental Science and Technology
Seminar, Massoud Pirbazari, "Scanning Electron Microscopy of Biological
Growth on Granular Absorbents Used in Water and Wastewater Treatment
Processes," 3:30 p.m., Room 136, Engineering 1-A Building.
S.A.M.E.-Dr. Robert Herrit, L. H. Greenwald, "How and Why
Engineers Find Themselves as Corporation Managers," 4 p.m., Room 262
North Hall.
Memorial Lecture-Tribute to Prof. Dorothy Robinson, Shirley Cooper,
"Field Teaching: Acculturation and Education for Clinical Social Work
-Practice," 4 p.m., Hale Auditorium.
Psychology-Prof. Reed Hastie, "Decision Making in Juries," 4 p.m.,
'3415 Mason.
Chemical Engineering-Prof. Brice Carnahan, "The Fortran IV
Programming Language-III," 7:30 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
n IAATDC-Dr. Frank Andrews, "Research and Development Activities,
and Technological Growth in Developing Countries," 8 p.m., East Conferen-
ce Room, Rackham.
PERFORMANCES
Pendleton Arts Center-Fred Bauchwitz, pianist, "Music at Mid-Week".
series, noon, Pendleton Arts Center.
Studio Theatre Series-Jean Anouilh's "Cecile," 4:10 p.m., Arena
Theatre, Frieze Building.
Germanic Languages and Literatures-"Der Wevteidiger hast das
Wort,"8 p.m., Max Kade German House, 603 Oxford Road.
Pendleton Arts Center-Poetry reading, Jane Kenyon, 8 p.m., Pendleton
Room, Union.
Musical Society-New York City Opera Theatre (in English), "Cosi Fan
Tutte,"8 p.m., Power Center.
MEETINGS
American Field Service Returnees Club-7:30, 229 Angell.
Students International Meditation Society-Introduction, "Transcen-
dental Meditation and TM Sidhi Programs," noon, 8 p.m., 4315 Union.
Stilyagi Air Corps-Science Fiction, 8 p.m., Conference Room 4, Union.
Ethics and Religion-Amnesty International-Urgent Action Chapter, 8
iT'm r4 ic thnric4 (Cbutrh State~ anal T-iron.

Richard Lesters 1467
HOW I WON THE WAR
A satire on WW Il-Relating the misfortunes of a British platoon led by a
veritable Don Quixote of military strategy. "A view of history not as tragedy
but as stupidity . . . The film's viewpoint is morally shocking, in the most
serious senge, and is seriously debatable; but it is neither immoral nor
amoral, and it is brilliantly, scathingly put."-Stanley Kauffman. John Len,
non's film debut in a non-Beatle role. By the director of A Hard Day's Night
and The Three Musketeers.
Thurs: REPULSION

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 & 9:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1.50

HARRY CHA PIN.
His songs reveal the extraordinary secrets of ordinary people.
His concerts are an intensely magical and emotional experience.
And his new album captures the essence of that experience.
LEGENDS OF THE LOST AND FOUND
A live, two-record set from the master of the story-song.
On Elektra Records and Tapes.

HARRY CHAPIN
Greatest Stories-Live

HARRY CHAPIN
Heads & Tales

e 1979 Elektra/Asylum Records Q A Warner Communications Co

A IE a E E a r% 0 P U9 U *1 0 A E1 U *t aE\ 4 21Of a %/vDIL0a EU __ 'A * aa

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