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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 12, 1979 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1979-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r pr
'F 'YO U EE NS f{MPE1CLLi.DAJL5'('
Ai number postponed
Muhammad Ali's scheduled tour of Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti has
been postpned indefinitely. The self-proclaimed "greatest fighter of
all time" was scheduled to make several local appearances this
weekend to raise money for the People's Choice Multi-purpose Center
in Ypsilanti, but a spokesperson for the center said the visit will be
postponed until further notice. The reason for the delay was not
disclosed. 'Included in the scheduled tour was a short speech by Ali
during halftime of the Michigan-Notre Dame game and a boxing
exhibition with county sheriff Tom Minick.
Your number is up
In an effort to 'get to know the students,' professors often ask
students to volunteer some personal information during the first few
days of classes. But when Ass't. Prof. Thomas Toon instructed each
student in English 280 to add up the digits of his or her social security
number, there were more than a few raised eyebrows. Toon instructed
all those with a total of 46 to stand up, and then proceeded to hand out
free copies of. some of the course's required books. When the 46s were
exhausted, he repeated the process with the 45s and 47s. It seems Toon
asked the publishers for some desk copies and they sent him too many.
Who says you can't coflect bebefits from Social Security before you're
65?
We're number one!
The Associated Press reported Monday that the board of trustees at
the University of Tennessee has awarded a $5.6 million contract to the
Rentenbach Engineering co. of Knoxville to add an 18,500 seat addition
to the university's Neyland Stadium, making it the second largtest
collegiate arena in the nation. "But who's first?" you might ask. Well,
it just happens that the largest collegiate arena in the nation is our
own Michigan Stadium, with a seating capacity of 101,701. When the
addition is complete, Neyland will hold over 90,000 spectators, making
it just larger than Stanford's stadium, which seats 86,352, and Ohio
State's, which can accommodate 81,000. Now you know.
More numbers than they know
what to do with.. ..
The football season is only a week old, but some far sighted (and op-
timistic) fans are already thinking about making plans to go to the
Rose Bowl. If you are, it just might interest you to know that Air
California has the highest bumping rate of any domestic airline in the
nation. According to figures released on Tuesday by the Civil
Aeronautics Board (CAB), last June Air California bumped 28.33 per-
sons per 10,000. Continental, Altair, and Northwest were the next
-_highest with 2096, 20.04, and 17.12 passengers bumped per 10,000
respectively. If you're more interested in getting a seat than in where
you go, you might try Wright, Trans International, or Air Wisconsin
airlines - according to CAB reports, they did not bump any
passengers during June.
t
Happenings
FILMS
Ann Arbor Film Coop-Knife in the Water, 7 p.m. only, Cries and
Whispers, 8:40 p.m. only, Cul-De-Sac, 9 p.m. only, all in Angell,
Aud.GA.
Cinema Guild-Iphigenia, 7, 9:30 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.

SPEAKERS
Dept. of Chemical Engineering presents Prof. Brice Carahan, "An
Introduction to Digital Computers and Computing Languages," 7:30
p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.'
West Michigan Environmental Action Council presents Ken
Sikkema, "Wetlands and Privacy," noon, 250 Hutchins Hall.
MEETINGS
Stilyagi Air Corps (U-M Science Fiction Society)-Introduction to
Science Fiction Fandom, 8 p.m., Conference Room 4, Michigan Union.
Communications for Women-Meeting for all University women,
noon, LSA, Room 2549.
Students International Meditation Society-Introduction, "Trans-
cendental Meditation and TM Sidhi Programs," noon, 8 p.m., 4315
Michigan Union.
MISCELLANEOUS
Auditions-Theatre Department auditions for Chekhov's The
Bear, 4 to 6 p.m., Frieze Building, Room 2518.
Bridge-Ain Arbor Bridge Club, 7:30 p.m., First Unitarian Chur-
ch, at Berkshire and Washtenaw.
WCBN-People, Places, and Issues presents "The University and
Divestment," Host: John Walters, Guests: Anne Fullerton, State Ad-
visory Committee on Financial Affairs and Jemadare Kamara,
Washtenaw County Coalition Against Apartheid.
Open House-University Activities Center (UAC) will offer an
Open House for potential members, 2 to 5 p.m., today and Friday, and
2 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 10 p.m. Thursday, UAC offices, 2105 Michigan
Union.
Rally-Potluck rally for the Oct. 7 March Against Hunger, spon-
sored by the Interfaith Council for Peace, 6:30 p.m., First Baptist
Church on Huron.
fl fhz, r iriJr0

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, September 12, 1979-Page 3
STARS MA Y BE HELD RESPONSIBLE

FTC
LOS ANGELES (AP) -
TV tonight, and chances ar
big name performers
plethora of products rangin
and cameras to dogfood an
ts.
Commercials mean big
wide exposure for stars ti
men.
BUT THE Federal T
mission, noting a virtuals
celebrities into the ad
scrutinizing the ethical si
high priced endorsements.
"We recognize that cele
sers are paid tremendous
money, for which consu
ultimately footing the bill,
attorney Mark Heller. "T4
they are truthful, these er
are very valuable. But to
they convey deceptive clair
more harmful."
In recent months, the FT(
in on commercials by two
men-singer Pat Boone
astronaut Gordon Cooper.
BOTH CASES, settle
litigation, were seen as war
to stars who endorse prodt
investigating manufacturer
The Boone case, which
waves through the- advi
dustry, was hailed by the F
dustry, was hailed by the
landmrk-the first time a
product he touted. In
agreement, Boone agree(
$5,000 share of manufacti
to consumers who pur
product Acne Statin.
Boone had appeared w
daughters in a commerci
the preparation was mo
than other acne treatment
said the claims for Acne S
sold for $10 a bottle, wer
tiated by scientific tests.
NEITHER BOONE nor I
would comment on the ca
lawyer had said earlier
shocked by the FTC action
doctor who invented th
assured him of its value.
That, said FTC offici<
enough. They want stars t
order independent scier
before promoting such
Albert Kramer,Pdireci
FTC's Consumer Protecti,
said the Boone case "sta
principle that an endorser
the claims made about the
product before the first
goes on the air or appears
risk FTC action."
BUT IN Hollywood, wher
get six figure contracts for
sements, there is no panic.
"That Pat Boone thing

watching
Turn on the usual situation," says Sandra Josep
re you'll see president of the Wormser,, Helfand
pitching a Joseph agency, which sets up lucrati
ig from cars celebrity commercial deals.
id deodoran- "I wouldn't let any of my celebr
clients advertise a pimple cream
money and Joseph says disdainfully. "Just as
urned pitch- wouldn't let them do a tampon co
mercial.
rade Com- "I'VE HAD 40 calls for one of my st
stampede of clients to promote a feminine hygie
market, is product," she says. "I've turned dov
de of those every one of them. I don't want r
clients to be identified by those prodi
brity endor- ts."
amounts of "In addition, she notes there are l
mers are potential legal problems with
says FTC "classy" well-known product.
o the extent "Most of my celebrity clients are on
ndorsements interested in very classy kinds of cor
the extent mericals - the kind Polaroid does
ms, they are says Ms. Joseph. One of the stars s
represents is Mariette Hartley, who
C has moved on the Polaroid spots with James Ga
well known ner.
and former
ed without RIGHT AFTER news of the Boo
ning signals case broke, Joseph concedes, son
ning without stars were scared away. "But then th
ucts , saw Polaroid bringing in people like I
sent claimshock Ullman . . . That's classy. As a rest
etisng shn there are people coming into comm
ert sin in- cials now who never cared before."
eTC as a Celebrities are being carefu
y e ebrita however.
a consent One of my clients was approached
a onsent abe spokeswoman for a charity's ar
urer to pay arefunds smoking campaign," Ms. Joseph I
chased s calls. ''The problem is she smokes.V
chased the turned it down.
ith his four "WE REALIZE that as soon as
ial claiming put a celebrity on as spokesman for
tre effective eFC product, that's an endorsement ..
ts. The FTC want it to be something they know a
~tatin, which like "Jh
e unsubstan- , Jospeh says.
"Any intelligent agent who is not ju
his attorney blinded by money isn't going to put
se, but the client into something like a pimp
usebutthe cream commercial." In fact, it is ju
Boone was such medicinal and scientifically bas
because the products that are the FTC's focus.
he product "The typical endorsements on ,'
als, is not from soda pop to floor wax, are not
o srsnlly concern to us," says Heller. "Wh
Spersonally we're talking about are technical are
atific tests - medicine, engineering, and scienti
a product. matters which require expertise."
on Bureau, THUS, THE FTC filed complain
nds for the against the manufacturer and adve
must verify tiser of an alleged mileage-increasi
e advertised car device, the GR Valve. The TV pit
commercial man was ex-astronaut Cooper, and I
in print, or FTC said he was falsely presented as
e celebrities expert in automotive engineering.
such endor There was no financial penalty, but
an agreement reached in July, Coop
was not a agreed to investigate more carefu
any product he endorses. The ads hai

celebrity
ph, been dropped by Admarketing Inc., the
& company which sold them to TV.
iv In a strictly legal sense, attorneys
differ on whether the FTC could win a
ity court case against a celebrity endorser.
,"
I "It could be argued that if the public
m- knows the endorser is a famous actor
who is being paid to say these things,
ar they would not accept his statements as
me those of an expert," says Beverly Hills

TV

ads

attorney Warren Deutsch. "But if the
celebrity says, 'I personally guarantee
this product,' that could create liability.
It's really an untested area."
The FTC's Heller cites a related legal
contract as support for the FTC
position. In the 1969 decision, the
California Supreme Court held that
Good Housekeeping Magazine could be
liable for a product endorsed with its
seal of approval.

Michael Cacoyannis'

1977

IPHIGENI.A
Based on Euripides' tragedy "Iphigenia in Auglis,' this Greek film presents
one of the most striking tales from the Trojan War-the sacrifice of Agamem-
none's daughter and the revenge of his wife, Clytemnestra. With IRENE
PAPAS and TATIANA PAPAMOSKOU. Music by Mikos Theodorskis.
Thurs: BIRTH OF A NATION

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 a 4:30

OLD ARCH AUD
$1t.50

I .1

Come Celebrate Briarwood Movies'
First Rocky Horror Anniversary
This Friday and Saturday
WITH SHOWS AT 12:00 MIDNIGHT
AND 2:00 AMI THAT'S RIGHT
2:00 AM (after the bars close!)
R
}No P layinatBtefedT ars

LIVE at the
SECOND CHANCE
MITCH RYDER
with special guest "TIGHT"
Monday, September 17
Advance tickets at the Second Chance, Schoolkids Records, and
Wherehouse Records in Ypsi. $4.50-limited number available.
U=M MUSEUM OF ART
OPEN HOUSE
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14-4-6 P.M.
-Three special exhibitions:
Image and Life: 50,000 Years of
Japanese Prehistory
-The Inuit (Eskimo) Print
-Inuit Sculpture
- Exhibition-related films
- Live Japanese music
- Light refreshments
FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

I

WEDNESDAY IS
"BARGAIN DAY"
$1.50 UNTIL 5:30

I

MATINEES DAILY AT MONDAY NIGHT IS
3"GUEST NIGHT"
STATE 1-2-3-4AdultAdmitted
Doors Open 12-45 P.M Fot$3.00

State 1.2*31m
231 S. State* 662-6264 -ANN ARBOR
1:05-4:05-7:05-9:35
A kong ume ago in a galxy far far away
(Upper Level) ____

(PG)
Fie T T m 1
Dolby Stereo 1:15-4:15-7:20-9:55

1214'S.U ' 668-6416-ANN ARBOR
Mon.-Tue.-Thur.-Fri. 8 P.M. BEST PICTURE
O ERT IWINNER Wed.
51:30
4.4
DE NIROACADEMY 8:00
AWARD

I

/l

Wavsy~idp
30 2 0 ~hna 434-1782 -YPSILANTI Fri.-Mon.-Tue.-Thur.
GREASE-7:00
I S f FEVER-9:00
/ ~ is the word
...Catch it SAT.-SUN.-WED.-GREASE 1:00-5:00-9:10
FEVER 3:00-7:00

a

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