100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 12, 1978 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

age 2-Tuesday, September 12 1978-The Michigan Daily

House keeps hiring

advantages

for vets in civil service bill

WASHINGTON (AP)-The House
voted yesterday to leave intact most
civil service provisions that give hiring
advantages to veterans, voting to in-
clude only slight changes in President
Carter's civil service reorganizaion
bill.
The vote was a setback for Carter,
who had sought to make significant
changes in the veterans-preference
practice, but the administration con-
tinued to back the overall plan to
overhaul the civil service system.
HOUSE MEMBER voted 281 to 88 for
an amendment sponsored by Rep.
James Hanley (D-N.Y.) to make only
slight modifications in the, existing
veterans' preference system which
gives retired military service personnel
a lifetime advantage over other ap-
plicants for federal positions.
Earlier in the day, administration
forces hoping to budge the bill agreed to
push for Senate consideration this year
of separate Hatch Act changes to allow
more political activity by federal em-

ployees.
In return, Rep. William Clay (D-Mo.)
and a few other Democrats displeased
about the civil service bill's lack of
Hatch Act revisions promised to drop
stalling tactics.

ministration of the revamped system.
Merit system principles are written
into the proposed law to limit the
political influence on the bureaucracy.
A Senior Executive Service would be
created for top-level government

The civil service

bill, which is one of

the. president's major domestic initiatives
and the centerpiece of his government re-

organization drive,
Service Commission.

abolishes

the Civil

THE CIVIL service bill, which is one
of the president's major domestic
initiatives and the centerpiece of his
government reorganization drive,
abolishes the Civil Service Com-
mission. It would be replaced by a
Merit Systems Protection Board to
handle employee appeals and an Office
of Personnel Management for ad-

RE1NA NCE
FINAL SUMMER
INVENTORY REDUCTION
SALE
Suits ................................. up to 70% off
Sportcoats .......... ...........35% off
Wool Trousers.................... up to 50% off
Cotton Trousers .................... up to 50% off
Sweaters............................upto50% off
Selected Shoes .........................50% off
Dress & Sport Shirts ............... up to 70% off
Ladies Suits, Slacks, Skirts
& Shirts ...................upto 50% off
LADIES & GECNT.EMCN'S EUROPEAN CIOTItNG

noww
~.- ..*' 7
B
so.
Mai
9..

managers. They would sacrifice some
job security for possible merit pay in-
creases.
A Federal Labor Relations Authority
would also be created and the amount
of permissible union bargaining would
be increased.
HANLEY'S AMENDMENT would
cut back the use of preference for
retirees who had attained at least the
rank of major after 20 years in service,
and it would change to 30 percent from
50 percent the degree of disability
needed for noncompetitive appoin-
tment to federal jobs.
Opponents of his amendment said the
present system works to the disadvan-
tage of minoirities and women as well
as younger veterans, particularly those
of the Vietnam era.
Under present law, veterans are
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LIXNo.5
Tuesday, September 12. 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Saturday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates: $12
September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail,
outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published through Saturday
morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
-------------
HOUSE OF

7-11 p.m.
HALF PRICE
on.
BEER
dnesday-Half Price on
leer & Liquor 7-10 pm

f 4.

V le I MVLJLIL

a ane+ r Tn

day -15 oHot Dogs
2-5 p.m.-(while they lost)

'i

'i

F0
0l1

_IMPORTS
ORIENTAL RUOS 10% OFF j
I WITH THIS COUPONI
TAPESRY CLOTHES, JVELRY,
1 WALL HANGINGS, and lotsI
mere! 20% OFF
WITH THIS COUPON
320 E. Liberty 769-3555

409 MAYN1NRD

ANNr ARDOR ,MI.

769-8511

310 Maynard St.
Hours: 3 pm-2 am, Fri. 11:30 am-2 am

M-Th. 11-7, Fri. 11-9, Sat..11-6

given preference by adding points to
their passing score on civil service
examinations. Disabled veterans get
more points, and the length of a
veteran's military service is also con-
sidered.
AN AMENDMENT similar to
Hanley's was adopted by the Senate, so
there is virtually no chance veterans
preference cutbacks will emerge from
Congress during this election year.
Clay sought last week to attach a
proposal containing the Hatch Act
revision to the civil service bill. But his
move was bloced when the proposal
was ruled out of order and not germane
to the bill.
Although the administration supports
Hatch Act revisions, it opposed Clay's
maneuver. This opposition lead Clay Ito
accuse the administration and the
House leadership of using heavyhanded
tactics.
President Carter succeeded in ap-
peasing Clay with his promise to inter-
cede with the Senate leadership on
behalf of the Hatch Act bill.
"I share your concern that the Senate
has not acted upon Hatch Act
legislation and intend to bring this con-
cern to the attention of the leadership
there," the president wrote.
Tax plans
win first
court
round
(Continued from Page)
too extreme for Michigan since, unlike
California, there has been no explosion
of property taxes here, and there is also
no huge budget surplus to make up the
lost revenue.
. The voucher plan is a proposal
which would do away with the present
formula for state assistance to local
public schools. This proposal would do
away with property taxes to finance
school education, and give the state
power to increase other taxes to make
up-lost revenue. The state would then-
give direct grants to parents of school
aged children, and they could use that
rebate to send their children to public,
private or parochial schools. This, then,
is a roundabout way of providing
assistance to parents of children atten-
ding private and parochial schools,
which raises one of the remaining
political bugaboos in state history.
Already, the forces-and the
money-are lining up for the battle this
fall. The Michigan Education
Assocition, opposing all three, is expec-
ted to pump about $500,000 into a cam-
paign to defeat the tax plans.
The powerful United Auto Workers
(UAW) are still wrangling over what
stand to take on the proposals, but UAW
insiders expect the union to oppose
Tisch and the voucher, and support
Headlee since the candidate it endor-
sed-Fitzgerald-supports Headlee.
Complicating the issues still further
is the prediction that all three will win
in November. A recent poll by Market
Opinion Research shows Headlee and
Tisch both with pluralities of over 40
percent.
If all three pass-and since there are
contradictions in the three
proposals-the Michigan Supreme
Court may have to decide which one
will take precedence over the other two.
One unconfirmed report says that

Michigan Attorney GeneralFrank
Kelly will make a statement later this
week on the legal technicalities of
which of the three proposals will take
precedence, assuming all three pass.
PISTONS
CLEVELAND
CAVALIERS
CRISLER
ARENA v..
SEPT.
24
8PM

--._._-

I -,-... . . .

To y energy-efficient heat pump keeps
heating costs from going up the chimney.

i

In the old days you had to stay
close to the hearth to keep warm
because most of the heat from a blazing
fireplace went right up the chimney.
Even with today's modern furnaces,
some of the heat goes up the chimney
and is lost outdoors. Not so with
a heat pump.
Now the energy-efficient heat

The heat pump is generally the most
energy-efficient way to heat homes,
apartments, offices and commercial
buildings because it makes good use
of natural heat. During periods of
low temperatures supplementary heat
is added automatically.
In summer the heat pump saves
on cooling costs, too, because it's also
on~~f dnrY7. iin sr-r trrn

natural heat is a natural way to
conserve energy and to keep heating
costs from going up the chimney.
For more information on the heat
pump, call or stop in at any Detroit
Edison Customer Office.
Save where it really counts.
The power is in your hands.

I

pump can keep you warm in winter by an energy-cricircniioner.
moving natural heat always present in So consider a heat pump for your
the outdoor air inside your home. next heating system-because using
::..;. ::::. .:fir:::::

iQ

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan