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September 12, 1978 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1978-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


I YC SE NEWS APOMCALL WDI Y~

ISRAELIS PRESS BEGIN
Peace group

Attention grabber
A bomb threat was phoned in to police headquarters on Sunday.
Police were told that there was a bomb at the phone booth at the
corner of State and Williams. Arriving at the scene, they evacuated
the area and cautiously approached the phone booth. Inside the booth,
there was an empty box with a message on it, "People's Coalition to
Free Mike Stoner-please leave a generous contribution." Police said
they did not find a bomb or leave a contribution.
Happenings . .
.the second part of the film series "Elizabeth R" will be shown
today at 2 and 7:30 p.m. in the Main Library Meeting Room of the Ann
Arbor Public Library at Fifth and William. . . at 3 p.m., exercise your
vocal chords at a meeting and audition for the Arts Chorale in
Auditorium A of Angell Hall. . . Professor David Pinkney of the
University of Washington will lecture on "France, 1940-1847: The
Decisive Years" at 4 p.m. in the West Conference Room of the
Rackham Building ... at 4 p.m., Professor of Education Wilbur
Cohen will speak on "Next Steps in Federal Programs for Children,
Youth and Family" in Schorling Auditorium at the School of
Education. . . the American Zionist Youth Foundation will hold office
hours between 4 and 6 p.m. at Hillel, 1429 Hill St. . .. bring your dinner
to an organizing meeting of East Quad Outreach in room 164 of East
Quad at 5 p.m. . . . a meeting of the Washtenaw County Coalition
Against Apartheid will be held at 7 p.m. at the Guild House ... also at
7, there will be a Hill Dorm Outreach organizing meeting in Markley
Room 4402 . . . again at 7, the Union of Students for Israel will conduct
an organizing meeting at Hillel. . . the National Organization for
Women will meet in the Unitarian Church on Washtenaw Avenue,
coffee at 7:30, program at 8.
Don't boo gie in Henryetta
Don't dance in Henryetta, Oklahoma if you want to stay within the
law. A city ordinance in effect since 1957 outlaws public dancing in the
town, but a local businessman claims the ban is unconstitutional. Ross
Hullett is planning a public dance in Henryetta for Saturday. A group
that wants to open a discotheque favors the dance and vows bigger and
better dances are to come. Public dancing in Henryetta is a
misdemeanor punishable by a $35 fine, although local police haven't
decided whether or not they will enforce the ordinance.
A lot of bull
No one can say that Soenderjylland's Jens hasn't made the most of
his 11-year existence. He has fathered 220,000 offspring in his career as
Denmark's leading bull of the Danish black-and-white milking
variety. But, alas, all good times must end, and Jens will meet his end
at the Royal Veterinary and Agricultural High School in Copenhagen
next week. His skeleton, however, will be set up as a monument at the
school's Institute of Animal Husbandry.
Onthe outside.. . .
there will be some relief from the heat today as the mercury
climbs only to the high sixties. Scattered showers and mostly cloudy
skies are in store for most of the day. Lows tonight will be in the '50s.

gamsi
TEL AVIV, Israel (AP)-The Peace
Now movement was born with hopes of
nurturing the flicering flame of peace
brought to this war-weary land by the
leader of its equally tired Egyptian foe.
In six months it has become a potential
political force, despite government
claims it is hampering negotiations
with Egypt.
As Menachem Begin packed to leave
for the Mideast summit at Camp David,
Md., almost 100,000 Peace Now suppor-
ters packed a Tel Aviv square ap-
pealing to the prime minister to be
more flexible in his negotiations with
Eyptian President Anwar Sadat.
THE GRASS-ROOTS movement
grew from seeds planted during Sadat's
visit to Jerusalm last November.
Three hundred Israeli war
veterans-moved by fears that peace
hopes born in the first-ever talks bet-
ween the once implacable enemies
were fading-sent a letter to Begin
asking him to be more flexible in
dealing with Egypt.
"When Sadat came to Jerusalem, it
was like a dream come true-never
before did we believe peace was
possible," says David Felder, a 27-
year-old combat veteran who is Peace
Now's spokesman. After Sadat's
November 19 visit "we expected the
peace to be signed within weeks or
months, but nothing happened,
something collapsed."
Peace Now believes Begin's gover-
nment annoyed Sadat by continuing to
build Jewish settlements on captured
Arab land and refusing to talk about
withdrawal from the occupied West
Bank of the Jordan River.
HOW MUCH THE movement can
sway Begin as he sits with Sadat and
President Carter in the sheltered
tranquility of Camp David remains to
be seen. But the heated reaction to the
movement from Begin's office is in it-
self a barometer of Peace Now's
strength.
Since the veterans' appeal, the prime
minister's supporters have accused
Peace Now of undermining government
policy at a critical juncture, of being a
noisy minority, of being an arm of the
opposition Labor Party, and of being
personally hostile to Begin.
A public controversy boiled, drawing
followers into Peace Now's ranks.
THE MOVEMENT kept up its
pressure for compromise, choosing as
its methods anything that would grab
public attention-demonstrations,
roadside petition booths, newspaper
ads, and in one instance, a human chain
along the side of the Tel Aviv-
Jerusalem highway, passing a letter
with 6,000 signatures to the door of
Begin's Jerusalem office.
Peace Now advocates no longer ex-
pect peace tomorrow. "We want our
government to come out with a
declaration of intent that for peace
we'll give back territory," says Shula
Koenig, a 48-year-old engineer and
Peace Now supporter. She is typical of
the movement's backers-an educated
Israeli who cares passionately about
her country.
Ms. Koenig wants to be sure
"we'll consider Israel's security needs
in their purest sense, and not in any
mythical or historic perspective." She
was referring to the proponents of a
"greater Israel"-Begin among
them-who believe the occupied West
Bank and the Gaza Strip are parts of
Jewish homeland of biblical times.

nfluence
HARRY HURWITZ, a South African-
born newspaperman whom Begin hired
to improve his image abroad, believes
Peace Now's actions were "unfor-
tunately timed."
He says they weaken Israel at Camp
David because "the overwhelming
majority of Israelis support Begin's
very serious peace efforts."
As proof he points out that 92 of the
120 member Knesset, the Israeli
Parliament, including the Labor Party
opposition, endorsed the major elemen-
ts of Begin's peace policy before he flew
to Camp David last week.
"There's always been an element
that opposes the government," says
Hurwitz. "Now this element has
become more vocal, that's all. It's
always the same people."
PERHAPS THOSE "same people"
have taken to the streets because they
have no clout in Parliament. The Labor
opposition would seem eligible to
represent them, but while it was in
power it was responsible for forming
many of the policies, such as Jewish
settlements, that Peace Now opposes.
The reform-minded Democratic
Movement for Change, which drew
dramatic support in the May 1977 elec-
tion that toppled the Labor govern-
ment, has been shattered by internal
rifts. That leaves only Begin or the
communists and Peace Now avoids any
association with the far left.
"WE SHOWED the country that
being a dove is not being a communist,"
says Peace Now's Orgad Vardimon,'a
bearded theatre manager. "We are the
pioneers in peace in Israel in 1978."
Last month, 100 army veterans out-
side the movement went a step further
than Peace Now advocates. They wrote
to Begin saying they would refuse to do
reserve duty if they had to protect
Jewish settlements in occupied
territory.
Peace Now sharply opposed that
position. But there is little doubt the
100 veterans got the confidence to send
their letter when they saw how suc-
cessful Peace Now has been in the first
six months of its existence.
Movement leaders say they are
helping Israelis overcome the
psychological obstacles to making
peace.
Ms. Koenig said Israelis are tired of
war and "understand that peace can
never be more dangerous than war."
"What the peace movement has done
is helped all of us identify one another,
those who feel we can start trusting the
other side-knowing that peace you
make with enemies, but peace you must
make," she said.
' !II

The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, September 12, 1978-Page 3
- -- -
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM 1978-79
BEST OF BROADWAY SERIES
j USHER APPLICATION
Name
Address Zip Code
Telephone U of M ID. No.__
IRULES I
I 1. You must be a U of M student.
I 2. You must choose your series in order of preference.
3. Married students may send applications together.
I 4. This application MUST BE POSTED BY U.S. MAIL ON OR AFTER Friday, ;
I September 15, 1978. Mail to: Usher Best of Broadway Series, Professionol
Theatre Program, Michigan League Bldg., Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
] 5. Must include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. I
PLEASE NUMBER CHOICE 1,2, 3,etc.
I CHOICE
SERIES A: (Fri. Eve.) Oct. 6, Nov. 3, Feb. 2, Apr. 204
SERIES B: (Sat. Eve.) Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Feb. 3, Apr. 2
SERIES C: (Sun. Mat.) Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Feb. 4, Apr. 22
SERIES D: (Sun. Eve.) Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Feb. 4, Apr. 22
NOTE CURTAIN TIMES:
All Evenings at 8:00 p.m. Matinees at 2:00 p.m.
THE SOUND OF MUSIC ............ October 6, 7, 8
CALIFORNIA SUITE..............November 3, 4, 5
SIDE BY SIDE BY SONDHEIM ...... February 2, 3, 4
YOUR ARMS TOO SHORT TO ...... April 20, 21. 22
BOX WITH GOD'
An nArborJazz Festival197
In. Celebration of the Music of
DI IKF FL I NGTON

Hill Auditorium September 21-2
THURS,21st8pm FRI,22nd-8pm.
MAARY LOU WILLIAMS JOHNNY GRIFFIN
STAN GETZ DEXTER GORDON
MAX ROACH Ot./ARCHIE SHEPP FREDDIE HUBBARD

J

SAT,23rd-8pm
STANLEY
TURRENTINE
KENNY BURRELL
SUNRA

SUN,24th-1pm
II V I ORCHESTR
CHICO FREEMAN
HUBERT LAWS

.SUN MERCER

MOSE ALLISON
ART BLAKEY

ELLIINGTON/
DUKE ELLNGTON
ORCHESTRA

-I

. .iyf cn..... .......................................
S DaiyOfficial Bulletin

:::::::::::::.:."..................

Tuesday, September 12, 1978
eneral Notices:
Co Members of the University Teaching Faculty:
he Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Project will
ard grants to support faculty research in the
ceful uses of nuclear energy. Yhis will include
rk in social sciences, physical , biological sciences
engineering. To continue to support as many
earch projects as possible and because the money.
ailable is limited, requests for $3,000 or less will be
nsidered appropriate. Grants may cover
uipment, supplies, research assistance, and field
ips. Project will not pay salary of principal
vestigator. Only projects rated "excellent" or
very good" by Divisional Review Boards likely to
e considered for funding. Priority for awards giver
1) new faculty, particularly those who need,
nding in order to seek research support from
utside agencies, 2) established faculty who need

assistance in opening a new area of research.
Applications from faculty who have received
extensive Phoenix support previously given lower
priority. Applications for grants should be returned
to the Phoenix Project by Friday, September 29,
1978. Grants made by December 1, 1978.
Application materials and detailed instructions
obtained from office of Phoenix Project, Phoenix
Memorial Laboratory or call 764?6213.
* * * *
UM Computing Center announces public showings
"The DECwriter Terminal and MTS ," a videotape
on use of LA " DECwriter terminal, the standard
public terminal at Computing Center, NUBS, BSDA.
Schedule of showings: (videotape is W hour) Sept.
12: Tuesday, 7-10 p.m., Multipurpose Rm., UGLI.
Sept. 13, 14, 15: Wed., Thurs., Fri.: 7-10 p.m., Rm.
212, UGLI.
Individuals who cannot be accommodated at one
showing will be asked to wait until the next showing.
For more information-764-9595.

FESTIVAL SERIES TICKETS NOW .ON SALE
AT MICHIGAN UNION BOX OFFICE
(M-F 11:30-5:30) $30, 25, 20
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS GO ON SALE
THIS TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
AT THE MICHIGAN UNION BOX OFFICE
$6.50, 5.50, 4.50
Individual tickets available at other outlets September 13: Schoolkids, both
Discount Records, all Hudson's Stores
Thanks to Major Events Office, UAC, National Endowment for the Arts. For more
information call 763-1453

L
..__._

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