100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 13, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Democrats

Still

Over

Religions

POLAND, TURKEY SET:
Council Vacancy To Be

UNITED NATIONS, N. Y. (A') --
A compromise agreement was
reached last night ending the'
East-West deadlock over filling a
vacancy in the United Nations
Security Council.
It was agreed ,that Communist
Poland and United States-backed
Turkey :would split a two-year
term with Poland serving the first
year.
The agreement was disclosed by
United States Ambassador Henry
Cabot Lodge after a- conference
which included representatives of
the Soviet Union, the two con-
testing countries and Victor An-
dres Belaunde of Peru, President
of the General Assembly.
It came as the 1959 session of
the General Assembly neared ad-
journment.,
Earlier the Assembly approved
unanimously a plan for giving the

United Nations a role in the
peaceful exploration of outer
space.
Refuses Approval
The Assembly approved a Unit-
ed States-Soviet plan setting up
a new UN study group on outer
space. It had been recommended
earlier in the day by the Assem-
bly's political committee.
The Assembly failed to approve.
a new Asian-African resolution
urging informal French-Algerian
talks for ending the five-year-old
rebellion in Algeria. The vote was
30-22 with 20 abstentions, which
fell short of the required two-
thirds majority.
The United States abstained on
the resolution, while Britain vot-
ed against it. Both Western pow-
ers had opposed a more strongly.
worded resolution approved on
Monday in the political commit-

tee, but not by a bi
gin to win Assemb
Each section of
won two-thirds a
paragraph-by-para
the Assembly failed
required majority
on the resolution a
was regarded as
France, which boy
bate, but served n
disregard any res
geria.
Reach Agre
A two-thirds m
quired in the Asse
tion. Some diplom
that the Assembly
without filling the
try again at a resu
January.
Agreement on of
reached in approve
tion setting up a
mittee to study in
operation in the p
outer space.
Given represent
committee were sev
five neutral and 1
the West or allied
The formula was
lengthy private ne
tween United Stat
Henry Cabot Lod
Kuznetsov, Soviet]
Minister.

Second Front Page
December 13, 1959 Page 3

Worried
Question
Republicans
Split Debate over
Rockefeller
g enough mar-
Ly approval.A
the resolution Nixon Seems Ahead
pproval in a In Midwestern States
graph vote. But
3 to give it the WASHINGTON (A)-The reli-
when it voted gious issue arose again this week
s a whole. This to complicate the Democratic pres-
a victory for idential picture.
cotted the de- At issue was whether the Catho-
iotice it would licism of Sen. John F. Kennedy
olution on Al- of Massachusetts hurts him as a
candidate.
eement Among the Republicans, the big
ajority is re- question was whether Nelson A.
mbly for elec- Rockefeller is on the way up, or
fats speculated out.
might adjourn The New York governor included
vacancy, and seven states on his last big tour,
zmed session in beginnng today, that will help him
make up his mind on whether to
uter spae was buck Vice-President Richard M.
al of a resolu Nixon for the GOP Presidential
24-nation com- nomination.
ternational co- Nixon Ahead
eaceful uses of Chill winds for Rockefeller -
warm ones for Nixon-were blow-
ation on the ing from the Midwest. Republican
'en Communist, state chairmen, meeting at Chi-
2 nations from cago came up with such appraisals
with them. as these:
worked out in Ohio-"The vast preponderance"
egotiations be- is for Nixon.
es Ambassador Wisconsin-Sentiment is "over-
ge and Vasily whemingly Nixon."
Deputy Foreign Minnesota - Rockefeller will
have to do "a lot of catching up."
But a Rockefeller man, state
chairman Judson Morhouse of
New York, recalled that in 1940
Wendell L. Willkie came from far
back to win the Republican presi-
dential nomination.
Morhouse also reminded his' fel-
low chairmen that a lot of people
counted Rockefeller out before he
swept to a party-inspiring triumph
over Democrat Averell Harriman
in the New York governorship race
last year.
Question Catholicism
There was an echo of more
ancient history in the Democratic
camp, on the question of a Roman
Catholic holding public office.
Dr. Daniel A. Poling; Protestant
minister who is editor of "The
Christian Herald," brought up the
matter in relation to the presiden-
tial aspirations of Kennedy.
Poling said he knew of a time
when the Catholic Church exer-
cised authority over Kennedy, who
was then a member of the United
States House, and caused him to
cancel a promised appearance at
a meeting in which Protestants
and Jews were also to participate.
Declines Comment
Kennedy declined to comment.
That left the Poling story stand-
ing.
After several days, Kennedy's
office got out a one-sentence com-
ment: "All we can say is that the
story is inaccurate."
The only Roman Catholic ever
7 'nominated for president by a
major party was Alfred E. Smith,
chosen by the Democrats in 1928.
There was a Republican-Catholic
angle this week, too. Rep. William
S. Broomfield (R-Mich.) reported
there has been considerable talk of
putting a Republican Catholic -
Secretary of Labor James P. Mit-
chell-on the GOP ticket if the

Democrats put Kennedy on theirs.

r

By STEPHANIE ROUMELL
"Since the war there has been
no major figure or innovation in
British prose writing." Prof. Her-
bert Barrows of the English de-
partment said recently
"I feel badly about being as
negative as this - but it's true."
The period between the wars
was an exciting time in English
fiction writing with much hostil-
ity shown toward such writers as
James Joyce and E. M. Forster,
he continued. But there has been
no such exciting fiction since.
Amis, Wain Best
The best, however, has been
small books by John Wain and
Kingsly Amis, Prof. Barrows not-
ed, two writers of the group usu-
ally referred to as the "Angry
Young Men."
"One can't avoid using this
term, (though they must be sick
of hearing themselves so termed),
and it is true that certain writers
have impressed themselves as dis-
tinct personalities on the reader's
consciousness."
Other writers often associated
with this group are Angus Wilson,
John Osborne, and John Braine.
"Wilson is older than the others.
His latest book, 'The Middle Age
of Mrs. Eliot,' has some sort of
notion of human decency and
sympathy of what human beings
are up against," Prof. Barrows
commented.
Book 'Full, Rewarding'
"The book is full, rewarding,
with a kind of richness we haven't
been getting."
Braine's "Room at the Top," he
continued, "I can't help feeling is
a slap-dash, sleazy novel, though
the movie was "absorbing."
"Joyce Cary ('The Horse's
Mouth') is not to be confused with
the Angry Young Men, Prof. Bar-
rows pointed out. "He is a minor
novelist who has been raised to
the status of a major writer by
critics for lack of none other"
And Iris Murdock is not part of
the group, either, he added, al-
though she is often discussed with
them.
"The Angry Young Men, then,
are the writers who compose the
center of the literary scene in
England today. But they have def-
inite limitations: they work with
a small form - small and modest
novels, and they have a certain
sameness, repeating themselves
with the same scenes from novel
to novel."
Yet their books, modest in
scope, are written with the hon-
est, fair minded belief that the
writer left to himself can put
down something of the truth,
Prof. Barrows maintained.
Twelve-Tone
Music Blasted
By Russians
MOSCOW (P)-Soviet composers
Dmitri Shostakovich and Tikhon
Khrennikov praise American hos-
pitality but predict a black future
for American music.
Tass quoted Shostakovich as
saying he and other Russian com-
posers were impressed by the
"warmth and great cordiality with
which we were received."
But they joined forces in Prav-
da to blast twelve-tone music,
which they said has captured the
younger generation of United
States composers to their great
detriment.

ARTS AND LETTERS:
No Great Writers
In Postwar Britain

"Anyone exposed to fiction in the
pre - war years has the feeling
that it has all been done before,"
he continued. "The bounds of ex-
perimentalism were pushed to the
ultimate by such novelists as
Joyce.-
"So in the face of Joyce's gran-
diose novel with his painstaking,
secluding techniques; the Angry
Young Men writers undertake
modest novels and use modest
techniques."
The theme of the Angry Young
Men usually involves an inde-
pendent young man from a red
brick university -- not one of the
top, elite ones - going out to face
life, Prof. Barrows related.
'Offer Honest Look'
"Through this theme they offer
an honest look at society and hu-
man dilemmas as they observe
them," he noted.
Since the war Britain has been
bogged down by the drabness of
life in the welfare state, but Eng-
land has continued to be the piace
for fair-mindedness and free dis-
cussion, Prof. Barrows revealed.
"So if these writers feel angry
and want to kick, nobody will stop
them."
Not Always Important
"But at times Amis and Wain
protest about things which aren't
important - the recurring scene
in the home of an academic per-
son who is made to look ridicu-
lous."
The Angry Young Men and the
Beat Generation have often been
spoken of in the same breath,
Prof. Barrows pointed out, but the
two groups bear little similarity.
"The Beats are permissive, self-
indulgent, working without any
form, but the Angry Young Men
are not letting themselves go in
the same kind of spasm."
Writing Formless
The Beat Generation writers
have removed inhibitiveness to the
point that they get no support at
all, he continued. Their writings
appear to be an end product of
what has happened before.
Now the Beats are capitalizing
on it.
As in Britain, novelists in
France are inhibited in the face of
all that has happened in the novel
previously, Prof. Barrows said. In
the French anti-novel, the writer
tries to get away from the author
as a personality.
The book involves a certain
stretch of time in which every
happening is related minute by
minute with no attempt to single
out and emphasize any one, he
explained thus removing any kind
of subjectivity
"It is the kind of book one
reads to page 40, then closes for
good; for the attempt to reject
the author's personal view of the
characters leads to dullness.
Alan Robbe-Grillet's "The Voy-
eur" and Michel Butor "L'Emploi
du Temps" are some of the best
known anti-novels.
However, the Axis countries,
such as Germany, were shut off
from the major literary activity
of the West since the early thir-
ties, and they were not oppressed
by the extreme experimental in
the novel, Prof. Barrows noted.
"So today the ordinary German
novelist can experiment without
feeling that it has all been done
before, a
"Perhaps you can't find major
novels every year in any country
-yet in all the nations of Western
Europe as well as the United
States, there are lively minds tell-
ing how life is and how it could
be."

Say

ev H H tina

with NOEL NOVELTIES from
DOWNTOWN

9
9
7
a
7
7
a
7
3
7
w 7
7
J
7
1
J
J
7
J
7

4:

a

Y :. b

We had a vision of a heave
we collected our new l
fluf dreams are made of
peignoirs and slips ..
... .frosted with color..
301SoTrrHMAnI NO;
Only the Finest Quality at Prices tb

nly Christmas when
!ingerie. Here is the
Snight gowns
. . tinselled with lace
lat are Fare

OPEN MONDAY 9:30-8:30

s

b ,
'
~0 .

HAND LOTION
4S
{OA

*

r
" . :
.. ~ ,
j"
"
"'

0
-.4.

.e"l "

.I

LIPSTICK
Ys.:::......
ffv
:v
:;}^
r r"
} .

Personally 'dle

t _

Comfy SiF

oF
Y
w
Y 411 w""
i
t
Y .. 3
' ' t
kJ.
x r {'
: 1 4 is
c f

$500

Dorm!

White
Red
Black
Pale blue
Pink
Yellow
Royal blue
Turquoise
Leother

BE HR FAVORITE SANTA
-
Give her lingerie from our
' ' Exquisite Collection
-<:: .Choose from;
SLIPS
/ ~ ~ kHOSIERY
PETTICOATS
1 2KNIGHTGOWNN
/ / HOUSECOATS
'4

P:

4
soothfng Christmas smoothie
comes garbed In a porn-porn
cylinder as festive as the
* season itself. $2.00 plus tax.
SOAP...tO bathe In luxury;'two
cakes of delightful Directoire
soap adoratiy wrapped in
oearning gold and fluffy femi
gIniy $1.75 plus tax.
cyie. as lovely as only

w

$550

1Y4
a <
1,..iv t
''4 i

Charles of the Ritz can offer
and encased in a column
on which stands the carolling
angel herself. $1.50 plus tax.

* ,"
'

4*

Bath Shell

m n cn Red 1

i

-~ .'D

!

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan