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December 13, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY,

1

TODAY is positively your last
day to order the 1960 Eusian be.
fore the prices climb!
See your Housing Representative Now.

j

Perfect Spot for Christmas Shopping!
FO LLrETT's
2nd Floor Children's Department

BOOKS

GAMES
Buy and Save at

TOYS

State Street at North University

r.1...

Bartlett Sees
Slim Hopes
"I have a feeling we could end
up with no tax program this year,"
State Superintendent of Public
Instruction Lynn M. Bartlett said
here Thursday.
"What chance will we have for
new taxes in an election year?" he
queried, in discussing the state's
current financial problems with
the Ann Arbor Area Business and
Professional Assn.
In his estimation, the $34 mil-
lion Senate-sponsored nuisance tax
now under House consideration is
a "pittance" and "totally unrealis-
tic."
Schools May Close
But if the Legislature fails to
pass the new tax plan, Bartlett
warned, a "few" of the state's pub-
lic school systems may be forced
to close before the end of the
current school year.
With the state unable to meet
all its state-aid obligations, he ex-
plained, some schools have had to
seek bank loans, using forthcoming
state revenues as security, to keep
in operation.
Banks May Stop Loans *
He indicated that banks may
refuse further loans to public
schools already in debt if state
revenues do not materialize, forc-
ing the schools to close.
Unless new taxes are levied or
the Veterans Trust Fund liqui-
dated, the state will owe Michigan
schools up to $62,000,000 at the
end of the 1959-60 school year,
according to Bartlett.
Sees Debt Rise
He foresees that by next June
the state deficit will rise from its
present $85,000,000 to $167,000,000
if there are no new tax measures.
The Legislature's moratorium of
capital expansion at the Univer-
sity, Bartlett reminded one Uni-'
versity spokesman, could cost
$600,000 to $700,000 in added
building cost to structures in the
future because of the increasing
expense of material and labor.
Gray Addded
To Faeulty

1 I I Y IYIYYYY Y 1 I 1 Y YIYYY!l YI

Remember when .

FOOD FOR THOUGHT-South Quad men expressed their dissatisfaction with dorm food when they
erected this sign in 1957. They apparently' hoped that this peaceful protest would win them better
meals sooner than a dining room riot such as the one which occurred the year before.

Continuous
Today
From 1 o'clock

Program Notes

DIAL
NO 8-6416

Brought Back at Requests
of ThoUSands of Students
THE HOW L I NG COME DY H I T
ai EAsTWAn COLOR *"CINEMASCOPE,
e-- TONYR fNDALL TH ELMA lT1

It was the chilly Sunday even-
ing of Dec. 2, 1956.
Students generally 'were slack-
ing off in their studies as the.
Christmas recess was just around
the corner. A few students en-
gaged in a brief snowball fight
outside South Quadrangle but
quickly gave it up as the dinner
hour was approaching.
Inside, South Q u a d r an gl1 e
menus listed corn beef and cheese
as the main plate for the usual
Sunday night snack.
Serve Corn Beef
Men of Reeves and Kelsey filed
through the dinner line, took one
disgusted look at the corn beef
and cheese and left the counters
empty-handed. The rest of the
Quadrangle quickly followed suit.
A few brave students filled their

By Barton linuthwaite
plates but were quickly booed by
their irate fellow students. Sever-
al succumbed to the chants of
"We want better food" and de-
jectedly left their plates on the
relish table.
The University's first food riot
was gaining momentum.
The South Quadrangle demon-
strators' shouts rose in volume as
the food strikers banged clean
forks against empty plates ac-
companied by chants of "We want
food. "
Over in West Quadrangle a sim-
ilar scene was being enacted. Both
demonstrations had begun simul-
taneously, at approximately 5:45
p.m.
South Quadrangle residents
then milled about outside the din-
ing hall and flowed outside in a

group to support their fellow riot-
ers of West Quadrangle.
Estimates put the shouting,
chanting students at about 900 to
1,000. One group of 300 marched
to East Quad in an effort to gain
their support. The demonstration
there lasted only .five minutes be-
fore the combined quadrangles
moved on to University President
Harlan Hatcher's home..
Dean of Men Walter B. Rea in-
tercepted the crowd at the steps
of President Hatcher's home on
South University.
Pleads With Rioters
Rea pleaded with the rioters to
disband, promising their com-
plaints would be taken up if they
were voiced through the proper
University channels.
The entire demonstration had
lasted an hour and a half.
The "proper channels" were
quick to act on the food rioters'
complaints.
The Inter-House Council hint-
ed at a broad investigation of
Residence Hall food from Food
Service (Quadrangle supply agen-
cy) down through the business
staff and into the Residence Hall
kitchens.
Rumors that the following
night's dinner had been changed
from spaghetti to roast beef to
appease the angry Quad residents
proved unfounded as the consid-
erably quieter students placidly
filed through the dinner lines for
the nightly offering.

By SUSAN FARRELL
"Chamber music is like poetry
demanding attention to the
subtleties and the nuances," Uni-
versity composer-in-residence Ross
Lee Finney once. wrote.,
"A string quartet is not just a
symphony written for four instru-
ments; it is a much more intimate
expression and it demands real
participation from the listener .. .
Nothing excels chamber music
literature, perhaps because it was
never written for show but for the
sheer love of music."
It is rather generally agreed
that the performances of the Uni-
versity's Stanley Quartet demon-
strate this love of the music they
play.
Quartet members Gilbert Ross
and Gustave Rosseels, violins,
Robert Courte, viola,. and Oliver
Edel, cello, will present their see-
ond concert of the fall semester
at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday in the
Rackham Lecture Hall.
The program includes "Quartet
in D major, K. 575" by Mozart;
"Quartet in A minor, for Jean on
her, Birthday" by Vaughn Wil-
liams and Beethoven's "Quartet in
F minor, Op. 95."
* * *
The University Choir, conduct-
ed by Prof. Maynard Klein, will
present a program of music from
seven countries, covering the last
four centuries, at 8:30 p.m. Tues-'
day in Hill Aud.
"Each number has been chosen
because of its significance in
choral literature," Prof. Klein.
said, "and a great part of tlie pro-
gram will be sung unaccompa-
nied."
The first half of the program
will be devoted to Christmas mu-
sic from England, Russia, United
S t a t e s, Czechoslovakia, I t a 1 y,
Switzerland and Germany. Gio-
vanni Gabrielli's "Hodie Christus
natus est," a motet for double
choir, will be given its first per-
formance in modern times.
The University Choir will also.
sing "Motet No. III, Jesu Meine
Freude," a chorale motet by Bach'
and Antonio Vivaldi's "Gloria."
The program was chosen in ac-
cord with Prof. Klein's explana-
tion that for the past ten years
the University Choir has chosen
to sing what they consider "im-
portant choral literature - music.
that should 'come alive' in the
University community."
A brass choir and a chamber
orchestra, conducted by Robert
Hause, will accompany the choirs.
University carillonneur Prof.

Percival Price will precede the
concert with a half-hour chorale
prelude played from the bell-
tower of Burton Memorial Tower.
The age of the romantics - the
age of Byron, Friederich, Cole-
ridge and Beethoven-will be dis-
cussed by Prof. Arthur Eastman of
the English department on the
University's "Legacy" series at
12:00 noon today on WWJ-TV.
"What had been eccentric in the
preceding age of manner -- to
bare the soul, to be different, now
became centric in the age of the
Romantics," Prof. Eastman said.
"The Romantic was rebelling
against his forefathers the way
youth always rebels. He felt the
18th century had been too rea-
sonable."
"The Romantic wanted a re-
turn to nature," Prof. Eastman
explained. "He wanted emotion,
and passion, and he felt the im-
agination had been shackled.
Grimm's "Fairy Tales" with their
exotic, sometimes morbid senti-
ments, have a wonderful success
in the Romantic Age."
Today's program on the age of
the romantics is one of a series
exploring the mind of man
through the centuries.
.* * *
Ann Arbor's most recent art
gallery, known as "the GAP," is
planning a new show to open ear-
ly in January.
It will include paintings, sculp-
ture and ceramics, as does the
present exhibit. Contributors are
University art teachers, students
and well-known artists from other
schools and academies.
"It's the kind of gallery where
you walk in bearing your gift, and
if it's good, it stays," George
Klikunas, one of GAP's contribu-
tors said.
GAP is at present involved in a
tangle with the landlord of the
gallery over the legality. of their
using an apartment as an art gal-
lery, perhaps in violation of the
lease agreement.
Organiza:tion
Notices
Am. Chem. Soc., meeting, Dec. 15, 12
noon, 3003 Chem.
* * *
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Christmas Play: ""The Be-
loved Community" by Torre Bissell,
Dec. 13, 7 p.m., Douglas Chapel, Con-
gregational Church. Return to Guild
Hse: coffee, talk.
Gamma Delta, Luth. Stud. Club, sup-
per at 6, candlelight Christmas carol
service at 7, Dec. 13, 1511 Washtenhw.
* * *
Deutscher Veren, Christmas meeting,;
Dec. 15, 8 p.m., Union, Rm. 3-Gf. Speak-
er: Dr. V. H. Miesel, "German Art."
* * *
La Sociedad Hispanic, Tertulia, Dec.
14, 3-5 p.m.; Fiesta De Navidades --
Programs, Bale, Refrescos, bring mem-
bership cards, Dec. 15, 8 p.m., 3050 FB.
* * *
Luth. Student Assoc., play: "The
Shepherd Tale," Dec. 13, 7 p.m., Hill
at S. Forest Ave.
* * *
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Dec. 13,
4 p.m., Lane Hall. Speaker: Dr. van
Wylen, Mech. Engr. Dept. "The Possi-
bility of Peace."
* * * m
Newman Club, Dec. 13, 4 p.m., Fr.
Richard Center. Speaker: Fr. Anthony
Zimmerman, "Catholic Teaching on
Overpopulation." Everyone welcome.
Tau .Beta Sigma, rushing musicale,
Dec. 14, 7:30 p.m., Harris Hall.
* * *
Unitarian Student Group, meeting,
Dec. 13, 7 p.m., 1917 Washtenaw.
Speaker: Judge W. McCree,Detroit Cir-
cuit Court Bench, "The Dead Sea
Scroll."

1

I

Starting
TODAY

DIAL
NO 5-6290

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SARTL2NG 2fRAMA...S'ttJitiNiNCL9t PRODUCED AND FILM'ED2
: ' RARELY NAS TIDE LOTION PICTURE CAMERA.
. PROBED SO DEEPLY INTO A WOMAN'S HEART!

Massive New 'Brain'
Receives Constant Use

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L r"N Aa c ,t.o~e JACK BARBARA KEENAN GEORGE
L REN HUNIERWARDEN-NICHOLS-WYNN-SANDE
' nvCaaRLO FOIc n a MARCEU0GIRO " e.g),leSoINEYLUJMET.&stnIare wMtIER BERNSTEIN *sxeiaal

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:
r

A C gHRISTMASGiFT WINNE

One of the top-ranking gradu-
ates in the law school's class of
1957 has been appointed an as-
sistant professor at his alma
mater.
The appointee, Whitmore Gray,
who is currently practicing law
with a. New York firm, will join
the University faculty beginning
next semester.
E" Gray ranked third in a class of
RSM- 253 at graduation. He served as
editor-in-chief of the Michigan
_r Law Review and was elected to
the Order of the Coif, a national
legal academic honorary society.
After completing his University
studies, Gray spent a year at the
Institute of Comparative Law,
e ' studying with the law faculty at
the University of Paris. He re-
turned to the United States late
t last year, at which time he be-
came affiliated with the law firm
of Casey, Lane & Mittendorf in
New York.
Gary will teach in the areas of
comparative law and restitution.
A native of Monroe, he received
b an A.B. degree from Principia Col-
lege in Elsah, Ill, in 1954, and
gS three years later earned a J.D.
degree at the University.
Announcement of his appoint-
ment, which has been approved by
the Regents, was temporarily
witheld at his request.

By RONNIE ROSENBLATT
In a centrally-located room on
the first floor of the Rackham
Computing Center, North Univer-
sity and Forest, stand 16 massive
metal units..
In the midst of these is a huge
rect:ingular object, whose face is
covered with rows of switches, but-
tons and variously colored lights.
Together. these 17 separate parts
comprise the University's new elec-
tronic computer.
The computer, according to
Bruce W. Arden of the Computing
Center, was acquired on August 1,
1959. Workmen worked one full
month to install it because the
units had to be connected by
means of cables laid underneath
the floor.
Rented for Research
The machine, which is rented
from International Business Ma-
chines Corp., would cost a business
corporation approximately $36,000
a month to rent. The University
charges $300 an hour for its use in
research projects which are backed
and financed by outside agencies.
"We have always had some sort
of a computer," Arden said, but
then explained that this is the
first large-scale machine the Uni-
versity has acquired.
It has a much larger capacity
than its predecessors and is better
able to solve difficult and involved
problems.
Solves Any Problem
The new computer can, in fact,
solve any problem which can be
reduced to a series of steps. Within
its scope is anything from complex
math to language translation.
The computer is fed all the
necessary information for the solu-
tion of a problem. It then deter-
mines the procedure it will follow

ii t

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in finding the solution by decoding
from a series of patterns inside
it. The problem is then solved at
the rate of 40,000 operations per
second
Many departments and individu-
als use the computer, and it is
constantly in operation, Arden
said

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VVi/

A 12" LONG-PLAY, HIGH FIDELITY RECORD
The University of Michigan Men's Glee Clu
sings the best concert and Michigan sons
from the past ten years.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1959
VOL. LXX, NO. 68
General Notices
Midyear Graduation Exercises: Jan.
16, 1960:
To be held at 2:00 p.m. in Hill Aud.
Exercises will conclude about 4:00 p.m.
Reception for graduates and their
relatives and friends in Michigan
League Ballroom at 4:00 p.m. Please en-
ter League at west entrance.
Tickets: Three to each prospective
graduate, 'to be distributed from Mon.,
Jan. 4, to 1:00 p.m. Sat., Jan. 16, at
Cashier's Office, first floor lobby of Ad-
ministration Bldg.
Academic Costume: Can be rented at
Moe Sport Shop, 711 N. University Ave.,
Orders should be placed immediately.
Assembly for Graduates: At 1:00 p.m.
in Natural Science Aud. Marshall will
direct graduates to proper stations.
Graduation Announcements, Invita-
tions, etc.: Inquire at Office of Student
Affairs.
Programs: To be distributed at Hill
Aud.
Doctoral degree candidates who
qualify for the Ph.D. degree or a simi-
I'

*

AVAILABLE FROM

MONDAY, DEC. 14-FRiDAY, DEC.20
3511 ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

LIFE MEMBERSHIPS
NOW AVAILABLE
TO SENIORS
Contact
Union Business Office

lar graduate, degree and who attend the
graduation exercises will be given a
hood by the University. Hoods given.
during the ceremony are all Doctor of
Philosophy hoods. Those receiving a
doctor's degree other than the Ph.D.
may exchange the Ph.D. hood given
them during the ceremony for the ap-
propriate one immediately after the
ceremony. Such exchange may be made
in the Natural Science Aud. after the
vecessional march.
The Regular fall meeting of the Uni-
versity Senate will be held on Mon.,
Dec. 14, at 4:15 p.m. in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
Plans for Mid-Year Graduation Ex-
ercises: Sat., Jan. 16, 1960, 2:00 p.m.
Time of Assembly: 1:15 p.m. (except
noted)
Places of Assembly:
Members of the Faculties at 1:15 p.m.
in Rm. 2082, second floor, Nat. S.ci.
Bldg., where they may robe.
Regents, Ex-Regents, Dean and other
Administrative Officials at 1:15 p.m. in
the Botany Seminar Rm. 1139, Nat. Sci.
Bldg., where they may robe.
Students of the various Schools and
Colleges in Nat. Sci. Bldg. as follows:
Section A: Literature, Science and
the Arts- front part of aud., west
section; Education - front part of aud.
center section; Architecture - front
,part of auditorium, teast section; Law1
-front part of auditorium, east sec-
tion (behind Architecture).
Section B: Graduate - rear part of
aud. with doctors at west end; Public
Health - Rm. 2004; Social Work -
Rm. 2004; Flint College -- Rm. 2004
(behind Social Work).
Section C: Engineering - Rmn. 2054;
Business Administration - Rm. 2071;
Dental - BRm. 2033 (North end); phar-
macy - m. 2033 (North end); Nurs-
ing - Rm. 2033 (South end); Natural
Resources - Rm. 2023; Music, - Rm.
2023 (behind Natural Resources).
March into Hill Aud. - 1:45 p.m.
Academic dress.
Applications for The University of
Michigan Sponsored Research Fellow-
ships to be awarded= for the spring
semester, 1959-60, are now being ac-
cepted in the office of the Graduate
School. The stipend is $1,125 plus regis-
tration fee per semester. Application
forms are available from the Graduate
School. Only applicants who have been
employed on sponsored research for at
least one year on at least a half time
basis are eligible and preference will
be given to applicants who have com-
pleted the equivalent of at least one
full semester of graduate work at the
time of application. Applications 'and
supporting material are due in the
office of the Graduate School not later
than 4:00 p.m., Fri., Jan. 8.

t U

John Sands...
either brave-
or fool!

l

SUSPENSEON
.THE HIGH SEAS!
METRfl-GOLDWYN-MAYER pres nts
in A .JULIAN.BLAUSTEIN PRODUCTION
*THE WRECK&V
MA Y DE ARE
in CINEMA3COPE snd
METROCOLOR'

The Student Automobile Regulations
will be lifted for Christmas vacation
from 5 p.m. Fri., Dec. 18, to 8 a.im.
Mon., Jan. 4, 1960..
Tickets now available for second se-
mester presentations of the Dept. of
Speech Playbill.
Richard Wagner's "Das Rheingold,"
to be presented with the School of
Music, Tues., through Sat., March 1-5.
Tickets at $1.75, $1.40, $1.00.
William Gongreve's "The Way of the
World" will play Wed. through Sat.,
April 6-9. Tickets at $1.50, $1.10, 75c.
"Look Homeward, Angel," the adap-
tation by Ketti Frings of the Thomas
Wolfe ,novel, if available, will be pre-
sented Wed. through Sat., April 27-30.
Tickets $1.50, $1.10, 75c.
The above productions will play at
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
At Trueblood Aud., Frieze Bldg.: The
premiere performance of an original
play, to be selected, Fri. and Sat., May
(Continued on Page 5)

11

Capt. Patch..
with a rep as
_g wrecker!

THE N EWMAN CLU B
presents a lecture by
REV. ANTHONY ZIMMERMAN, S.V.P.

Charlee Says

on the topic

"Catholic Teaching and the
Problem of Overpopulation"

Remember

®O* "

Sunday, December 13th, 4:00 P.M.
GABRIEL RICHARD CENTER
331 Thompson Street

J

-HOP

TICKET

S..C
TONI G HT a.t 8:00
Arthur Miller's4
"DEATH OF A SALESMAN
.:.a.L CDt1riEDIrv AA A D/LJ

Open to the public

Everyone welcome

r

I

RESERVATIONS

FEINER GLASS & PAINT CO.

II

216 W. William Street

Ann Arbor, Michigan

I Telephone NO 8-8014
II If

al

i

11

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