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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 10, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,GE TWO

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

0E TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:"
MSU Approves Course Waiver Exams

By ROBERT KAPLAN
LANSING -- A new waiver pro-
gram has been approved at Michi-
gan State University allowing ex-
ceptional students, to take exams
which will exempt them from
basic college courses: communi-
cation skills, natural science, so-
cial science and humanities.
The program, which will be in
effect beginning with the winter
term, will be open to incoming
high school, transfer and present-
ly enrolled students.
An average grade of B dr bet-
ter in high school academic sub-
jects and an A-average in the
subject and/or subjects closest to
the basic course in which the stu-
dent desires to take a waiver exam
DIAL NO8-6416
ENDS TONIGHT
"ROLUCK I NG
ENGLISH
COMEDY"
--N.Y. TIMES
ALASTAIR SIM
in
"THE GREEN MAN"
plus
*1Y'M SPECTATORS SHAKE WITH LAUG,14
TERI THIS IS ONE Of LIFE'S ALMOST-
VANISHED PLEASURES-THE SHARED
ENJOYMENT Of HUMOR AND ARTIS-
TRY ON THE SCREENI"
Wiliam . Znwu, K TL.lItoWTrbm1~

are the qualifications for applica-
tion for the exam.
' MINNEAPOLIS - A resolution
to oppose the loyalty oath provi-
sion of the National Defense Edu-
cation Act has been passed by the
Minnesota Student Association
Legislative Affairs Commission.
The resolution will be presented
to the Student Association.
The resolution stated the non-
Communist disclaimer placed stu-
dents in a disloyal light but rec-
ommended retention of the pro-
gram -by the University in order
to help students in financial need.
s . *
EVANSTON--The faculty com-
mittee on intercollegiate athletics
at Northwestern will not object to
changes in Big Ten athletic poli-
ALL
RECORDS I
25*o OFFj
LIST PRICE
buy NOW
for CHRISTMAS "
The UNIVERSITY
MUSic HOUSE
340 Maynard
across from Arcade
MMMMMMM.1

cy, according to Prof. T. Leroy
Martin, committee chairman.
After an hour or more of dis-,
cussion the committee found
nothing in the changes that would
lessen faculty control, Prof. Mar-
tin said.
* * * ~
COLUMBUS - Ohio State's
Student Senate wants the admin-
istration to take University regis-
tration away from off-campus
landlords Who practice discrimin-
ation in renting to students.
The registration law proposal
will be considered next quarter
by the Faculty Council.
The bill, sponsored by the Hu-
man Relations Committee, was
passed over a milder onetwhich
was casled "simply a statement
of what we are doing at the Pres-
ent time," by the chairman of the
Senate's Educational Affairs Com-
mission.
NEW YORK - Columbia Uni-
versity will join Princeton, Col-
gate, Rtgers and Swarthmore in
an experimental summer study
program for students interested
in international affairs.
The program will be operated
by the Woodrow Wilson School of
Public and International Affairs
at Princeton and financed by the
Carnegie Corporation.
The program begins in 1960 and
will be composed of honors stu-
dents selected by the college.
In the fall the college will an-
nounce both the program and the
year's unifying theme to eligible
juniors and seniors who have
demonstrated superior ability in
the study of international affairs.
Time in Europe will be spent in
seminars; independent research
and traveling to gain further ex-
perience in international affairs.
When the student returns to
the United States, he will write a
thesis concerh i n g the year's
theme, and receive one year's
course credit.
AUSTIN - The University of
Texas' Faculty-Student" Cabinet
has made several proposals con-
cerning improvement of orienta-
tion and scholarship and contin-
uing the foreign student program.
The system of advising and
personal and social relationships
of new students, a study of foreign
student orientation, and the pos-
sibility of an orientation program
for graduate students are the
main areas of orientation to be
investigated.
Interviews and participation in
foreign student activities, devel-
opment of a philosophy concern-
ing foreign students and recom-
mendations to the Cabinet will
highlight study of the foreign stu-
dent problem.
* * *
CHICAGO -- A new survey
course designed for superior un-
dergraduates will be started in the
winter quarter at the University
of Chicago.
The integrated course is intend-
ed to show how the understand-
ing of major intellectual works
raises questions involving several
basic disciplines.,
Materials of the course will be
one or more of the classics in
which the interrelations between
philosophical, literary and, his-
torical considerations are espe-
cialy interesting. "Gulliver's
Travels" is a typical example.
* * *
CHICAGO -- Tuition rates at
the University of Chicago have
been raised to $350 per quarter
for next year, or $50 more than
at present. Fees for three quarters
of full registration next year will
amount to $1,110.

-Daily-James warneka
HIGHLANDS-William Saroyan's play "My Heart's in the High-
lands" will be presented by the speech department at 4:10 p.m.
today in Trueblood Aud. in the Frieze Bldg. The play is a wistful
expression of Saroyan's dissatisfaction with society.
To Give Saroyan Play

JGP Cast,
Lead Roles
Announced
Girls cast in leading roles for
JGP's musical production, "What
Can You Lose" are : F re yd a
Schultz, '61Ed., as Mrs. Rocka-
morgen; Sandy Goetz, '61, as Lee
Townsend; Louise Rose, '6lEd., as
Sally; Janet Wilkinson, '61SM, as
Babe; Judy Weinberger, '61, as
Sonya; Evelyn Cohler, '61, as
Thisbe; and Shirley Larkin; '61Ed.,
as Mickey.
Other members of the cast are
Ann Gilles, '61, as Myrtle; Ceci
Galvin, '6lEd., as Sadie and
Kathea Poswalk, '61A&D, as Ma-
tilda.
The chorus includes: K a t i e
Martin, '61; Domini Shortino, '61;
Into Mednis, '61; Laurel Krause,
'61SM; Marianne Chardoul, '61;
Martha Magel, '61; R osa l i n d
Gans, '61; Joan Martin, '61; Nini
Lofstrom, '61A&D; Jean Greimel,
'61Ed. Sue Johns, '61; Mary Ges-
nel, '61Ed.; Anne Peterson, '61N;
Gail Saperstein, '61; Mary Anne
Pullen, 61N; Donna Arduin, '61;'
Marilyn Fiegel, '61; Sue Moag, '61,.
and Judy Novick, '61.
The dancing chorus consists of:
Suzanne Anderson, '61; Judy But-
zin, '61A&D; Judy Lurie, '61; Esta
Jo Bronson, '61; Judy Krempa,
'61; Anna Svenson, ' 6Ed.; Tina
Oppie, '61Ed.; Judy Gautz, '6lEd.;
Dee Rose, '61; Nina Peterson, '61;
Marjorie Haskel, '61; Phyllis Co-
hen, '61; Kathy Dean, '61Ed.;
Judy Chapman, '61Ed.; JaneEllen
Sachs, '61A&D; Barbara Roark,
'6lEd. Mary Helen Taylor, '61;
Gerry Ramos, '61Ed.; Andy Dar-
ling, '6lEd., and Pat Kirchner, '61.
The dancing chorus rehearsal
will be held at 7 p.m. today in
the League.
es Personal

The University will offer a sum-';
mer program to high school teach-
ers of earth sciences, and has an-
nounced Feb. 13 as the date of the
National Teacher Examinations.
Funds from the National Sci-
ence Foundation will support an
intensive, advanced course in
earth science this summer.
'The 36 high school science
teachers accepted for the six-hour
credit course will receive a stipend
of $450, a travel allowance, and
$90 for each dependent.
High school science teachers
applying for the course should
have three years' teaching exper-
ience and a background in the
basic sciences and math.
Also, prospective teachers will
have an opportunity to take Na-
tional Teacher Examinations on
Feb. 13, Prof. John E. Milholland
of the Bureau of Psychological
Services announced.
Application blanks and an in-
formation bulletin describing
registration procedures may be
obtained in Room 122, Rackham
Bldg., or directly from the Nation-

al Teacher Examinations, Educa-
tional Testing Service, Princeton,
N. J. Applications must rach the
Princeton office no later than Jan.
15.

To Decide

If

The Senior Board has appoint-
ed a four-man committee who,
with Prof. Hugh Z. Norton of the
speech department, will judge the
try-outs for the student speaker
at mid-semester graduation on
Monday.
All mid-year graduates are eli-
gible to compete. Contestants
must present speeches of no long-
er 4han five minutes in length
and in final form at the audition
this Monday.
Audition appointments can be
made by calling Bruce Wilson,
'60SM, NO 3-5806.

U Plans Training Course;
Teacher Exam Date Settled

By STEPHANIE ROUMELL
"Saroyan, like John Osborne,
expresses dissatisfaction with so-
ciety in his plays," Alan Katz, lab-
oratory bill coordinator of the
s p e e c h department's one-act
plays, commented, "but the two
playwrights show this dissatisfac-
tion differently."
Saroyan's "My Heart's in the
Highlands" will be presented by
the speech department at 4:10
p.m. today in Trueblood Audi-
torium in the Frieze Bldg.
Osborne strikes out vitriolically,
he continued, and even though his
"Look Back in Anger" is weak in
structure, its strong characteri-
zations make it a good play.
Better Structure
Osborne's "Epitaph for George
Dillon," currently running at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, is
better structured than "Look
Back," Katz said.
"Saroyan, however, looks at the
society about him with a wistful
sadness -sharplytcontrasted to
Osborne's vitriolic attack.".
He expresses wistfullness, Katz
said, with a great deal of warmth
-like a grandfather who loves his
naughty grandchildren.
Author Loves Children
"In 'Heart's' the main charac-
ter is Johnny, a young boy," he
continued; "Saroyan loves chil-
dren. His theory is that the child
still looks at the world with wide-
eyed wonder, as yet not disillu-
sioned."
"Mr. McGregor, a broken-down,
actor, comes to live at Johnny's
house," he related. "He has his
heart in the highland, for every-
thing he touches turns to sun-
shine."

"This is what Saroyan would
like life to be," Katz maintained.
McGregor is Scotch, but the
highland is more than that of
Scotland, he continued. It is a
spiritual highland where the
heart is free.
Comments Wistfully
And Johnny is hapy while Mc-
Gregor is there, he related. But
in the last scene, people from the
"old people's home" take the old
actor away, telling Johnny he is
going to play Lear in a play.
"Ironically, the sanest man in
the play is taken off to an insane
asylum."
"It is Saroyan's wistful com-
ment, so different from Osborne's
strident protest," Katz pointed
out, "saying this is how society,
has always been."
Norton Stress

GRAD STUDENT
CHRISTMAS PARTY
Fri., Dec. 11 9-12 P.M.
VFW Hall 314 East Liberty
COME STAG OR DRAG
admission: 75c per person

I
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ID Required

You Must Be 21

DIAL
NO 5-6290

SHOWS AT
1:00 - 3:30
6:10 -8:40

STARTING FRIDAY
The record breaking
comedy hit returns!
"PILLOW
TALK"

Approach in Play Direction

._"'

By JUDITH OPPENHEIM

Rock Hudson

Doris

Day

The Graduate Student Council is sponsoring.
a coffee hour Thursday, December 10 to 4:30
P.M. in Room 3-B of the Union. Dr. Findlay
Carpenter of the School of Education will
speak on the future of automated teaching.

"The director of a play must
feel that a dramatic work has be-
come a part of himself before he
attempts to stage it," Prof. Hugh
Z. Norton of the speech depart-
ment said.
"Although he should look to
other outstanding directors for
inspiration, a good director will
never attempt to copy another's
style," Prof. Norton, who is direct-
ing the current Playbill produc-
tion of John Osborne's "Epitaph
for George Dillon," explained.
Methods of direction must differ
according to the temperament of

I.

ACROSS CAMPUS (

the individual director,or the play
will become mechanical and un-
natural.
The director must study the
play until hedevelops a personal
attitude and approach toward it,
which will create unity and pro
vide a basic structure on which
to build the action.
Express Author's Meaning
The director's primary obliga-
tion is fidelity to the author, Prof.
Norton continued. The interpreta-
tion of any particular work need
never be finite, but the director
must strive conscientiously to ex-
press the author's meaning as he
understands it.
If the production is to be suc-
cessful, he continued every mem-
ber of the audience should under-
stand the action.
Character Illuminates
For this reason each actor must
attempt to, present his character
so that it illuminates the mean-
ing of the relationships among all
the other characters, he ex-
plained.
A production which is vague or
deliberately attempts obscurity
has failed in its purpose and is of
little value, Prof. Norton conclud-
ed.
ORCH ESTRAS
by
BUD-MOR
featuring

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Sunday: SOPHIA LOREN in "That Kind of Woman"

TODAY 4:10 P.M.

Department of Speech

"MY HEART'S iN THE HIGHLANDS"
by WILLIAM SAROYAN

The history department will
present a lecture on "The Return
of Lenin to Russia in 1917," by
Georgas Bonnin, a fellow at the
National Security Police Seminar,
Ohio State University.
The lecture will be held at 4:15
p.m. today in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Former political advisor for the
French delegation at the Nurem-
burg Tribunal in 1946, he has also
edited several political documents
and written "Bismarck and the
Hohenzollern Candidature."
* * *
The post-Stalin period of Soviet
literature will be the subject for
discussion by two specialists in
Russian literature at 8 p.m. today
on the University radio station,
WUOM.
The program, "Background,"

Trueblood Auditorium

No admission charge

I -
} TONIGHT and TOMORROW
at 7:00 and 9:20
Ia
OF NOTRE DAME"
with LON CH ANEY
S*C
SATURDAY at 7:00 and 9:00
SUNDAY at 8:00
Arthur Miller's
"DEATH OF A SALESMAN"
with FREDERICK MARCH

will feature Deming B. Brown,
chairman of the Slavic languages
department and Ernest J. Sim-
mons, professor of Russian litera-
ture at Columbia University.
* * *
The University chapter of the
American Society for Public Ad-
ministration will hold a lecture
on "The Public Administrator and
His Environment," by Prof. Al-
fred M. Pelham of the political
science department at Wayne
State University.
Following the lecture, to be held
at 8 p.m. today in Rackham Aud.,
there will be a Christmas social.
hour, open to the public.
* * *
Guest lecturer Prof. Robert So-
low of the Massachusetts Insti-
tute of Technology will speak to-
night on "Income Inequality in
the United States."
Tonight's lecture, one of a series
sponsored by the economics de-
partment, will be at 8 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheater.

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plus many

Men of Note
Bob Elliott
Al Blaser
Earle Pearson
Dale Seeback
others

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CALL NO 5-5705

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Organization
Notices

Baha'i Stud. Group, Meeting, The
Hidden Words-discussion of excerpts
from the Baha'i Writings, Dec. 10, 8:30
p.m., 517 Oswego. For transportation,
call NO 2-3548.
Christian Science Org., Regular Testi-
mony Meeting, Dec. 10, 7:30 p.m., Lane
Hall, Fireside Rm.
* * *
Grad. Student Council, Coffee Hour &
Speaker: Dr. F. Carpenter, "The Future
of Automated Teaching," 4:30 p.m., Un-
ion, Rm. 3-B; Monthly Meeting, 7:30
p.m., Rackham Bldg., W. Conf. Rm.,;
Dec. 10.
Kappa Phi, Cabinet Meeting, Dec. 10,
7:15 p.m., 1st Meth. Church, Green Rm.
* * *
Univ. Coed Horseback Riding Club,
Meeting, Dec. 10, 6:50 p.m., WAB. In-
formation, call NO 3-7778.

I

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