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December 10, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Q

UN Asks Repression End

1B

Russians

in

Hungary

11

Plea Milder

Than Past
Resolution
Proposal Deplores
Treatment of Rebels
UNITED NATIONS (AP) - The
United Nations called on the
Soviet Union and Hungary once
more yesterday to end acts of
repression against anti-Communist
Hungarians who rebelled in vain
in 1956.
By a vote of 53 to 10 with 17
abstentions the 82-nation General
Assembly approved a 24-nation
resolution aimed at keeping the
Hungarian question. alive at the
United Nations.
The 10 Communist nations-the
Soviet bloc and Yugoslavia-voted
no. The abstentions included all
the Arab nationals and a number
of Asian-African members. Haiti'
and Morocco were absent.
Resolution MildI
The resolution introduced by the
United States was mildly worded,
reflecting the spirit of East-West
accommodation that has been
characteristic of the. present Gen-
eral Assembly.

WATER SELLER-A bearded Pakistani sells water from a goatskin bag to people waiting for a
glimpse of President Dwight D. Eisenhower who was traveling to Karachi Tuesday to make a speech.
Ike Scores Necessary Success

Ike Keeps
Trip Idea
'In Mind'
Congressman Asks
Latin American Visit
WASHINGTON (P) -President
Dwight D. Eisenhower says a sug-
gestion that he visit Latin America
next year "will be kept very much
in mind."
His comment was made in ac-
knowledging a letter from Rep.
Armistead I. Selden, Jr. (D-Ala.),
chairman of the House Inter-
American Affairs Committee.
The President's letter made pub-
lic yesterday was dated Nov. 30,
the same day in which such a
trip was mentioned at a White
House conference with congres-
sional leaders.
Milton S Eisenhower, the Presi-
dent's brother, also has said he
hopes the President can make such
a trip.
Believes Productive
Selden, commenting on the
President's reply, said:
"I am happy that the President
is receptive to th idea of such a
visit because I believe it could be
productive of many results of mu-
tual benefit to the countries of
Latin America as well as to our-
selves.
"It is my hope that the Presi-
dent will be able to arrange a visit
next year in such a way that it
would be possible for him person-
ally to meet in South America
with all the headsof the Latin
American governments, even if it
proved impracticable for him to
visit each and every country per-
sonally."
Selden wrote Eisenhower on Nov.
20 saying that the establishment
of a National Advisory Committee
on Inter-American Affairs had im-
pressed him as "a wise and con-
structive act which should ma-
terially assist in achieving greater
mutual understanding in both the
United States and in-Latin Ameri-
ca of problem of common con-
cern."
'Marks New Step'
Eisenhower, thanking Selden,
said he believes "the establishment
of the committee marks a new
step in the further advancement
of our relations with Latin Amer-
ica.
"Your suggestion that I visit
the countries of Latin America
during the coming year will be
kept very much in mind," he
added.
In his own letter, Selden said:
"It Is an unfortunate fact that
by many of our good friends in
Latin America we are regarded as
taking their friendship for granted
to the extent of neglecting many
of the ties which could bind us
even closer in our traditional bonds
of friendship.
"It occurs to me that one of
the most timely, most effective,
and most patently sincere expres-
sions of friendship and good will
would be the undertaking by you
during the coming year of a per-
sonal visit to our sister republics
in Latin America. many of whose
chief executives over the years
visited the United States.

Second Front Page
December 10, 1959

QUESTION PRICING:
Senate Group Examines Drug Industry

£i tift

Da *

WASHINGTON () - Merck &
Co. Inc., one of the nation's big-
gest drug houses, charges $170 for
the same quantity of an anti-
arthritic remedy sold by a Mexi-
can firm for $13.61, a Senate in-
vestigator said yesterday.
John T. Connor, Merck's presi-
dent, promptly accused the Senate
Antitrust Subcommittee of dealing
in myths He challenged the prob-
ers to summon doctors and to ask
them why they prefer to Merck
product to some lower-priced
drugs.
The clash came after Connor
had read a statement saying that
Merck, of Rahway, N. J., had will-
ingly slashed the price of cortisone
from $200 to $20 a gram within

three years after developing it in
1949.
Made Eight Cuts
Connor said eight separate cuts
were put in force "as we were able
to make improvements in produc-
tion effciency."
The cortisone price reductions
did not come about from any pres-
sure by other drug houses, Connor
told the subcommittee, but were
in line with a Merck policy to
make the latest medicine available
to the public as quickly and as
cheaply as possible.
John Blair. the subcommittee's
chief economist whose figures have
been challenged before, then took
the witness chair.
He produced evidence which he

U.S. Plans Observation
Satellite for Weathermen

said showed the Syntex Co. of
Mexico City wasclearing a profit
selling prednisone, an anti-arth-
risi drug, at $13.61 for each bottle
of 1,000 tablets.
Investigates Drugs
Blair was one of the first wit-
nesses Monday when the subcom-
mittee opened its investigation to
determine whether drug makers
are charging too much for their
preparations at the wholesale level.
Blair said Merck charged drug-
gists $170 for this quantity of
prednisone and that the rate to
patients was $283.33.
Connor attacked the validity of
Blair's reckoning. Among other
things, the Merck president said
the $13.61 figure represented only
an assumed price to a mythical
company.
Connor was the second drug in-
dustry witness to criticize Blair's
data, presented _in the early stage
of the subcommittee's Investiga-
tion.
The subcommittee counsel, Rand
Dixon, said he believed Blair's fig-
ures ,to be accurate. They were
prepared "on a very conservative
basis," Dixon said.
Francis C. Brown, president of
the Schering Corp., Bloomfield,
N. J., Tuesday disputed Blair's
testimony that Schering applied
markups up to 7,079 per cent on
some of its drugs, including reme-
dies against arthritis and female
disorders. Brown called Blair's
conclusions "severely damaging
and most unfair."

f

Last year a much sharper reso-
lution condemning the Soviet By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Union and Hungary was approved Associated Press News Analyst
54-10 with 15 abstentions.
This year's resolution merely de- NEW DELHI (sn w) - President
plored the "continued disregard by Dwight D. Eisenhower has scored
pioed he coninud dsreardbyan enormous success for American
the Soviet Union and the present rn en an a r wherias
Hungarian regime of the General been an ing-aru nd twhe im of
Assembly's resolutions dealing with crowded Asia
the situation in Hungary.' The success of his 11-nation
To Continue Efforts journey is bound to be gauged by
It requested New Zealand's Sir the popular enthusiasm it has
Leslie Munro, the UN special rep- aroused. By the time Eisenhower's
resentative on Hungary, to con- trip is over. it looks as if he will
tinue his efforts. It called upon have been received more enthusi-
Moscow and Budapest to cooperate astically, in more places, in a short
with him. space, of time, than any foreign
Munro's task is to see what can visitor in history.
be done to gain implementation of He has outshone Soviet Premier
previous resolutions demanding Nikita Khrushchev as a political
withdrawal of Soviet military salesman in Afghanistan and In-
forces from Hungary and restora- dia. He has been received with al-
tion of political freedom for the most hysterical approval in Turkey
Hungarian people. and Pakistan.
The Assembly's 9-nation creden- 'Great Personal Triumph'
tials committee also took a slap at It is a great personal triumph
the Budapest regime. It voted 7-2 but it can be more than that in
for a United States proposal thit United States reckoning. For
the committee take no action on Eisenhower has in effect demon-
the credentials presented by the strated to the world that the
Hungarian UN delegation. United States remains a symbol of
FIt's Christmas Time at Collins"
r y-
LAST-MINUTE SUGGESTIONS 9
for your roommate, pinmate,
friends, relatives or family.
ROBES SWEATERS
PETTI-COATS SWEATERS 9
BED JACKETS BLOUSES
LOUNGE SETS SLACKS
PAJAMAS BERMUDAS
GOWNS BELTS
P HOSIERY BLAZERS
HOSIERY CASES
SLIPPERS
MUK-LUKS DRESSES
COATS
SUITS
N APRONS RAINWEAR
f LINEN TOWELS UMBRELLAS
LINEN PLACEMATS
LINEN CALENDARS
COCKTAIL NAPKINS PERFUMES
JEWEL CASES JEWELRY
W SILK SCARVES KEY CASES
WOOL SCARVES CIG. CASES
LEATHER GLOVES LIGHTERS
FABRIC GLOVES BILLFOLDS
MITTENS CLUTCH PURSES
HANDBAGS
STOTE BAGS 9
EVENING PURSES
TRAVEL ACCESSORIES
BOUDOIR BONNETS
a; HAN DK(FRCH I FF

.1

Page 3

CAPE CANAVERAL (M) - Thev
United States may soon give its
weathermen an orbiting station
400 miles in space.
Plans call for launching two
experimental meteorological satel-
lites containing cloud-scanning
television cameras. The first,
weighing 250 pounds, is scheduled
for a mid-January launching by
an Air Force Thor-Able rocket.
The other will be sent up later
next year.
If successful, the project-called
Tiros--will provide meteorologists

with enough pictures to recon-
struct cloud patterns over a large
portion of the earth. This will
enable them to quickly spot devel-
oping storms and cold fronts, es-
pecially in the vast unmonitored
expanses of the world's oceans.
The first Tiros will be aimed at
a circular 400-mile orbit. Whirling
eastward about the earth's mid-
section. its passes will carry it
over an area extending several
hundred miles on both sides of the
equator.

hope to the peoples of Asia despite
all the propaganda, wars and cold
war vicissitudes.
All this is happening against a
backdr:p of Communist Chinese
muscle-flexing on this continent.
The hopes and dreams of many
people whose lot often seems hope-
less probably have much to do
with their joy at seeing a symbol
of the mysterious country across
the world whose people are happy,
strong and prosperous.
Considers Leaders
But the role their leaders play
has much to do, too, with their
reacticn to the visitor.
In Afghanistan a king worried
about his deeply religious people's
distrust of Soviet economic infil-
tration saw to it no obstacles were
put in the people's way in their'
turnout for the visitor.
When Khrushchev visited there
four years ago the reverse was
true.
In India, Prime Minister Jawa-
harlal Nehru - now disillusioned
about the brotherly intentions of
his Communist Chinese neighbors
after their truculent incursions in-
to territory India claims, and their
suffocation of Tibetan indepen-
dence--let his people know clearly
he considered Eisenhower a "mes-
senger of peace."
Wants Big Turnout
The Indian government obvi-
ously wanted a big turnout and
put hundreds of buses, trucks, and
other vehicles at the disposal of
tht public to bring in spectators
from villages and transport people
in Delhi to the area of Eisenhow-
er's motorcade route.
Even at that, the vastness of
the crowd and the wildness of its
Steel Dispute
Plan Rejected
WASHINGTON (P) - The steel
industry yesterday formally re-
jected Secretary of Labor James
P. Mitchell's proposal to submit
the steel-labor dispute to a third
party for settlement recommen-
dations.
R. Conrad Cooper, head man-
agement negotiator, said the in-
dustry could not"agree to shift its
bargaining responsibility into the
rands of a third party. That in
essence is what the industry has
been saying all along with regard
to the over-all dispute.

welcome perhaps startled Nehru.
But it has helped him serve clear
notice on the Communist world
that India still has hopes in the
future of an unregimented way of
life.
Welcomed Soviets
Four years ago Khrushchev and
Nikolai Bulganin received a big
welcome in India. Nehru at that
time seemed to consider it his role
to become referee in the East-West
cold war.
He was preaching his panch
sheel (five principles) interpreta-
tion of how nations should coexist.
This concept has attractions for
Asian intellectuals.
Storm Brings
Raging Seas;
Two Ships Sink
LONDON (P)--Two more ships
went down, and the death toll
mounted to 109 yesterday as one
of the worst winter storms in 23
years battered Europeans for the
fifth day.
Mountainous seas threatened
scores of ships fighting for survival
in waters along the coasts, and
radios crackled with appeals for
aid, reports of seemingly hope-
less searches and occasionally with
news of a rescue or of a ship that
had reached safety.
Worst of the disasters was loss
of 1,719-ton Norwegian freighter
Elfrida. She capsized near Lista
lighthouse off the south coast of
Norway. All of her crew of 20 were
believed to have perished. As their
troubles mounted they radioed:
"We are going down. Thanks for
all assistance. We have launched
our starboard lifeboat and will
try to leave the ship."
Other vessels laboring in the
storm rushed to the scene. The
motorship Buffalo of Oslo found
six bodies in the water. The Nor-
wegian liner Oslofjord, with 315
passengers aboard, sighted the El-
frida floating keel up and re-
ported:
"Now running before wind
searching for survivors." But the
liner's search was in vain.
A hunt for survivors by four
Catalinas sent out by the Norwe-
gian Air Force's air-sea rescue
service was called off at nightfall.

I ~

....
C

P You can pick a handsome pack of gifts for her
- "and friends ... Especially for those in line for
"Something Special" ... We know What she likes ..
we've seen her shop for herself, and for gifts .. .
So we've collected a Santa Pack of all her favorites
in the world of fashion.

JEWELRY
BLOUSES
WALLETS
SCARFS

* SWEATERS
* SKIRTS
* LINGERIE
* HOSIERY

*
*
*
*

GLOVES
KNEE SOCKS
SLACKS
DUSTER LENGTH ROBES

SPECIAL
GROUP
BETTER
JEWELRY
Rhinestones-
Gold-Silver
98c -1.49
49c
or 3 for 1.00

Main Store at
530 Forest
Just off So. Univ.
Corner opposite
Campus Theatre
and
The Campus Toggery
(for separates)
1111 So. University
(Just 17/ blocks
from Main Store)

f 4
r
i
x
,:
t"
":'. , j

II .. ^ . _ _ _ __

SEVERAL DRYCLEANING DAYS
UNTIL CHRISTMAS

Roommate of Girl in Picture:

Think your mom will like

Time is running out!
This is absolutely
THE LAST WEEK
to buy your

getting that box of dirty clothes for Christmas?
Girl in Picture: Who's giving her dirty clothes? These
things just came back from Greene's.
Roommate: You mean you're going home with all of
your things clean?
Girl: Sure, that's my Christmas present to Mother.
Roommate: She'll flip. Say, how did you pay for it?
Girl: I didn't. Just charged it.
Roommate: You mean Greene's will give you credit?
Girl: Credit where credit is due. Greene's likes my busi-
ness.

Sure they do... and they'll like your business
too. Matter of fact, Greene's has a free Travel Case
for home-going students just to prove how much
they like your pre-Christmas business. If you'd like
vmir ~ct~1Pan-d t i- to stav neat o n the trio

..

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