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December 06, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

viewer Praises Coming Production

SFAC:
Discuss Activities, Academics

His concert is the second in the'
Extra; Series presentations. Ois-
trakh will give a concert at 8:30
p.m. Monday in Detroit's Masonic
Temple. This is his second tour of
the United States, and is in con-
junction with the Soviet-United
States agreement for cultural ex-
changes.
s « «
A panel discussion, "Nature as
Imagery," will be held at 8 p.m.
Monday in the Rackham Amphi-
theater.
Prof. Guys Palazzola of the Ar-
chitecture and Design School will
be moderator for the panel which
includes Professors Chet LaMore,
Albert Mullen, and Richard Wilt,
all of the Architecture and Design
Schools
The fall concert of the Universi-
ty Symphony Orchestra will take
place at 8:30 p.m. Thursday in
Hill Aud.
Under the direction of Josef
Blatt, the orchestra will play Jan-
acek's "Sinfonietta (1925)" and
Schubert's "Symphony No. 9 in C
Major."
* * «
"Legacy," the University tele-
vision series, will present the best
18th century thought, painting,
comedy and music in a program
entitled "Th e Best of All Possible
Worlds," at noon today on WWJ-
TV (Ch. 4).
* S *
The program of another Uni-
versity Television Series,'"Accent,"
will explain what makes a rocket
fly through space, at 9:45 a.m. to-
day on WXYZ-TV (Ch. 7).
University physicist Samuel
Krimrn uses-the law of action and
reaction as his example in ex-
plaining the concept of a basic
law of physics.
Almost 400 paintings and sculp-
tures by American artfsts are be-
ing shown in the exhibition "Sec-
ond Biennial 'of American Oil,
Paintings and Sculpture" at the
etroit Art Institute.
Bach's "Contata No. 61" will be
presented at 7:30 p.m. today at
the Lutheran Student Chapel at
the corner of Hill and Forest. The
concert will be directed by William
Osborne, Grad.
J-Hop Plans
New Concert
I th Mathis
Something new has been added
to J-Hop this year-a concert at
Hill Aud. at 8:30 p.m., Friday of
the J-Hop weekend.
It will feature Johnny Mathis,
Robert Kaplan, '61E, J-Hop cen-
tral committee member, an-
nounced: Previous J-Hops have
had two separate dances, he con-
tinued, but this year one of them
will be replaced with the concert.

w4

By KATHLEEN MOORE

Daily-David Giltrow
Remember whe11.
By Barton Huthwaite
Campus Runs Dry

A growing emphasis on academic
pursuits, both in and out of the
classroom, seems to be discourag-
ing student participation in cam-
pus activities.
Most of the participants in yes-
terday's Student-Faculty-Admin-
istration Conference discussion of
"Student Activities versus Aca-
demics" agreed on this, but a
variety of reasons for the trend
and ways to deal with it were
offered.
Prof. Oliver Edel, of the music
school, saw the problem as a de-
veloping conflict between the de-
mands of academics and activities
on the student's time, intensified
More Rights
Requested
(Continued from Page 1)
Miss O'Neil and Virginia Sin-
clair, '60, charged the University
is far from mature concerning
another area-inter-racial dating.
Members of the administration
have spoken privately to parents
of women dating men of another
race, they said.
"It is a shame to try to get Amer-
ican and foreign students together
here when' the administration
doesn't seem to want it," Miss Sin-
clair argued.
Doubts Validity
Lewis said he doubted the valid-
ity of the charges. "As far as I
know, it's never been the policy to
write home solely because of a
student's dating habits," he said.
Some housemothers may be
guilty of writing such notes, Prof.
Bates pointed out.
The University lecture commit-
tee does not interfere with aca-
demic freedom as some say, Feld-
kamp declared.
Feldkamp, a member of the
committee, admitted that in previ-
ous years the group has been
overly restrictive about allowing
controversial speakers on campus,
but he emphasized d "changing
nature of the committee - they
haven't seriously questioned a
speaker for a long while."
Other students criticized the
Joint Judic for fining students al-
ready fined once by the city for a
single offense.
Owes Responsibility
Steve Marcus, '60, a member of
Judic, explained that he feels the
student owes a responsibility both
to the University and to the city-
therefore he is twice judged.
Larry Fenton, '61, replied that
such practise "just leads to an-
tagonism" and amounts to a case
of double jeopardy.
Lewis said the "double jeopardy"
charge is overworked in criticism
of the Judic, and described it as
one of the finest and most re-
sponsible organizations in the Uni-
versity.
Organization
[ Noticesj

by increases in course content and
in the size of the University.
And those activities which tend
to' gain° student support, Nancy
Adams, '60, insisted, have an in-
tellectual orientation - like eve-
ning lectures and small discussion
groups.
One reason for the current lacy
of interest in the large campus
organizations was brought out by.
Kenneth McEldowney, '61: stu-
dent activities begin so early in a
student's career (he cited the case
of a fourth-grade student council
president) that by the time he
reaches college, he's tired of par-
ticipating.
If he does join one of the larger
campus groups, he is usually as-
signed menial tasks that require
no creative thinking, Robert Junk-
er, '60, Daily city editor, pointed
out, further discouraging him
from staying on.
Prof. Lawrence Slobodkin, of the
zoology department analyzed or-
ganizations as being made up of a,
"few competent operators" who
profit from holding a top-echelon'
position and do a good job at it-
and the bulk of "ditto-machine
operators" who take care of the
details of bureaucracy without
benefiting much from the experi-
ence.
If

A partial solution to student
disinterest was offered by John
Ross, '61, who advocated letting
freshmen and sophomores take
over more of the creative work in-
volved in an organization, as the
Union did in delegating younger
members to the job of planning
yesterday's conference.
To encourage more participation
in all kinds of activities, Prof. Edel.
suggested instituting a five-year
curriculum to allow students time
to participate effectively, scholar-
ships on the basis of their involve-
ment in activities and either aca-
demic credit or some form of
official recognition for their ef-
forts.
"TASTELESS..."-N. Y Times
" JEJUNE..."-London Standard
TOM LEHRER has finally
recorded his new songs, Poisoning
Pigeons in the Park, Masochism Tango,
Oedipus Rex, We'll All Go Together
When We Go and 7 more.
AN EVENING WASTED
WITH TOM LEHRER
A live-concert recording
with spoken introduc-
tions by Mr. Lehrer.
12" LP TL202 .......... $4.98
12" LP TL202S (Stereo) . .. $5.98
MORE OF TOM LEHRER
Same 11 songs, sung by
him, but without the ap-
plause, laughter, and his
insipid introductory re-
marks.
12" LP TL102. . . . . . .. . $3.98
12" LP TL102S (Stereo) ... . $4.98
,1 You can get these at many stores,
if that's the way you want to be, but,
failing that, send check or money order
to MAELSTROM, INC. (Add 4% sales
tax for California orders.)
P S. Write for Maelstrom catalog any-
way. It's free.
444 Market Street t San Francisco 11,
Dept. 15 California

"

I

F

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the third
in a series of articles dealing with
significant happenings in the Uni-
versity's past.)
It was the night of April 30,
1918.
"A Bomb Berlin By Buying Lib-
erty Bonds" campaign was in full
swing on campus as war-conscious
students took the initiative on the
"home front.
But the "home front" was dis-
tracted from the war effort by
more immediate happenings .
Ann Arbor was going "dry" at 10
o'clock.
Prohibitionists had finally suc-
ceeded in pushing through the
Volstead Act ending the legal sale
of "alcoholic beverages." The Uni-
versity -campus was to suffer the
pangs of alcoholic thirst when
"the bells on the downtown clock
slowly toll the hour of dawn,"
The Daily mournfully commented.
Need Drinks
"Many men," The Daily con-
tinued, "have been heard to say
that it was impossible for them to
get along without at least a few
drinks a day."

No less than- 25 saloons, two
breweries and two hotels in Ann
Arbor were to feel the dehydrating
effect of the national Prohibition
law
Student sentiment on the cam-
pus was torn betweenatwo con-
flicting allegiances. "Idealism call-
ing for the banishment of the
saloon fights with blissful mem-
ories of many a joyous evening at
the local drinking houses," The
Daily observed.
Dealers Sold Out
A commemorative article, aptly
headlined "John Barleycorn Kick's
the Bucket," reported "although
most of the 25 dealers were sold
out ahead of time, there were no
disturbances or disorderly upris-
ings as expected."
Saloon keepers commented "ev-
erything went fine." Joe Parker's
Cafe and the Orient, immortalized
in Michigan songs, announced
they would soon be serving "milk
and soft drinks" in place of the
"hard stuff." An editorial sadly re-
lated how "back to Joe's and the
Orient, will become but hollow
traditions and memories which
will never enrich the coming gen-
erations of Maize and Blue alum-
ni."
A small note in a humor column
of The Daily the same day took
particular notice of the fact that
the campus drinking fountains
will be restored to service the day
Ann Arbor goes "dry."
Ann Arbor Chief of PoliceThom-
as O'Brien was ready to stop any
unusual outbursts of revelry and
rowdyism by students bent on
making the most of their last few
hours of legal liquor.
Saloons Close
Some of the more prominent
places to close were Joe Parker's,
the Orient, the Barrel House and
the Midway House-all prominent
drinking establishments .of pre-
World War 1 era.
"Every one of these places has
carried with it joy, troubles, friend-
ships, feuds, plots, hates, and love
and tears and laughter are both
loosed at the coming departure of
these things," John Barleycorn
continued.
But the "indulging" student
body was not to be inhibited by
the advent of the Prohibition era.
An advertisement in The Daily
several weeks later proclaimed a
special sale on hip flasks.

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t

Am. Chem. Soc., meeting, Dec. 8, 12
noon, 3003 Chem. Speaker: Dr. Jasel-
skis.
* * *
Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, grad. discussion group, Dec.
7, 8 p.m., 524 Thompson.
* *.*o
Gamma Delta, Luth. Student, Club,
reception - for visiting chapters, fol-
lowed by buffet supper, Dec. 6, 5 p.m.,
Luth. Center, 1511 Washtenaw.
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Dec. 6, 4
p.m., Lane Hall. Speaker: Dr. Palmer,
pastor AA Christian Reformed Church,
"Righteousness - Man's or God's."
* **
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Dec.
7, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB. Cafe y conver-
sacion.'
* * *
Luth. Student Assoc., Bach Cantata
No. 61 for Advent - Choir and orches-
tra, Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m., Luth. Student
Chapel, Hill and S. Forest Ave.
* * *
Phi Mu Alpha-Sinfonia, meeting of
pledges, Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m., Union, Rm.
3N.
* * *
Unitarian Student Group, meeting,
Dec. 6, 7 p.m., 1917 Washtenaw. Speak-
er: Don Meyer, Intern-minister, "The
Hipsters and Zen."

DIA NO 5-6290

2

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