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December 04, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIG IN DAILY

FRMA7

TIlE MICI~ '\N DAILY WR Tfl A
U U
- 4 t

'U' Requests
Salary Rise
Next Year
(Continued from Page 1)

NIGHT TRAIN ORCHESTRA:
Buddy Morrow Band To Play at J-Hop

report also showed marked
ciencies in academic salaries,

defi-
plot-

PROF. MAYNARD KLEIN
. 0.. to direct singers

To Present
Little-Known
Voeal Works
Prof. Maynard Klein of the mu-
sic school will direct the Tudor
and Michigan Singers in a Colle-
gium Musicum concert at . 8:30
p.m. today in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Realizing the Collegium Musi-
cum objectives of performing old
or little-known music, they will
present the first modern perform-
ance of two pre-Bach master-
pieces by Isaac and Pacherbel
which have recently been edited
by University musicologists.
Prof. Marilyn Mason Brown
will accompany on the harpsi-
chord.
To Present 'Missal
The Michigan Singers will pre-
sent Isaac's "Missa Solemne,"
with tenor William Cole, Grad.,
for which alternate Gregorian
verses were transcribed by Prof.
Louise Cuyler of the music school;
Pacherbel's "Magnificat," trans-
cribed by Prof. Hans David of the
music school and "In Nativitatem
Domini Jesu Christi Canticum" by
Charpentier, transcribed by Prof.
Wiley Hitchcock of the music
school. The Charpentier work was
first performed in modern' times
by the Tudor Singers in 1952.
Selections Varied
Other selections by the Michi-
gan Singers include Dufay's "Glo-
ria," "0 Eyes of my Beloved," by
Orlandus Lassus and "Au Jol
Bois" by Claudin de Sermisy.
The Tudor Singers will present
a selection of Christmas music,
featuring a Czech carol, "The
Birds;" an old English carol, "I
Sing of a Maiden;" "Song of Eve,
Reward My Tidings," a 16th cen-
tury Spanish carol, and lastly, a.
Swiss carol, "Christmas, How
Beautiful Thou Art."
The 18 voices of the Tudor
Singers present programs of me-
dieval and Renaissance music for
the Collegium Musicum.

ted against national income pat-
terns.
Since 1939, real income of the
national labor force has risen by
69 per cent, while University fac-
ulty members have only received
19 per cent more.
Can Supplement Income
Williams did say that faculty
members could supplement in-
come by teaching in summer ses-
sion, publishing and taking speak-
ing engagements.
From 1952 through 1958, skilled
maintenance workers in Michi-
gan received a 41 per cent boost,
unskilled men, 35 per cent, man-
ufacturing clerical workers, 48 per
cent, and Class V, VI, and VII
civil servants an average of 41 per
cent.
University faculty members re-
ceived an average 29 per cent in-
crease in the same period.
Also, the report maintained,
Ann Arbor continues to have one
of the highest costs of living in
the nation.
Other evidence for salary in-
creases cited in the budget points
to the high percentage of ad-
vanced students at the University.
Williams said the University has
at least one of the highest pro-
portions of graduate students in
the United States - 39 per cent.
Teaching Attracts
He added ,however, that besides
creating more difficult duties, the
attraction of teaching advanced
work was a positive factor in at-
tracting faculty to the University.
Other factors complicate the
salary problem.
Effective Jan. 1, new social se-
curity tax rates will be three per
cent on the first $4,800, which
will add $150,000 to University
payments to the federal govern-
ment.
In addition, salary increases
automatically increase obligations
for retirement programs, insur-
ance an dother fringe benfits that
will total $160,000.
Williams said non-salary con-
siderations are often as important
as salary in a professor's job sat-
isfaction.
Such factors as intellectual
stimulation from one's colleagues,
and freedom to determine one's
own academic future all come into
play, he amplified.
Faculty recruiting is similar to
any other kind of executive or
professional recruiting; family
wishes too often play a large part
in individual decisions.
All of these conditions figure in.
offers to faculty to change posi-
tions; he concluded.

By BEATRICE TEODORO
Buddy Morrow and his orches-
tra, featuring vocalist Jane Tay-
lor, will provide the music for
dancing at J-Hop 1961, on Feb. 6.
The trombonist and his Night
Train Orchestra will play at the
League Ballroom from 9:30 p.m.
to 2 a.m. Special late permission
will be extended to the women un-
til 4 a.m., according to Alex Fish-
er, '60, J-Hop general chairman.
Morrow began playing the
trombone when he was 12, and a
year later he was already play-
ing with dance bands at his high
school. A collegiate band in need
of a trombone player noticed him
and soon took him on.
Later he headed for New York
and the Julliard School of Mu-
sic. The depression eventually
forced him out of Julliard and
into full time band playing.
He started with Artie Shaw and
then went on to play with Eddy
Duchin, Paul Whiteman, Tommy
Dorsey, and Columbia Broadcast-
ing. After a hitch in the Navy, he
was featured in the Jimmy Dor-
sey band.
In 1951, after filling in as lead-
er for Dorsey several times, Mor-
row decided to strike out for him-
self and formed his own band.
During his first road tour, which
began disappointingly, he came to
Detroit and played a rhythm and
blues number called "Night
Train." He recorded it, and the
tune rocketd Morrow and his or-
chestra to fame.
They followed this success with
other popular recordings such as
"One Mint Julep," "I Don't
Know," and "Hey, Miss Jones."
J-Hop 1961 ticket sales will be-
gin Tuesday from 12:30 to 4:30
p.m. in the Administration Build-
ing, and will continue until Dec.
17.
EXplain Rush
At Meetings
"Both of the Rush Mass Meet-
ings held on Wednesday were ex-
ceptionally successful," reported
Al Bonnell, '60SM, Panhel chair-
man of the rushing counselors.
"The girls seemed to get a lot
more out of them than they did
in previous years. The meetings
had a more serious tone and ap-
parently were very well liked."
Prospective rushees received
"The Panhellenic Rushing Guide,"
a booklet explaining the sorority
system at the University and in-
cluding pictures of the members
of the individual sororities.
This pamphlet also included a
rushing registration card and a
map showing the location of the
different houses.
Registration for spring rush
will continue from 9 amgto 5 p.m.
today and tomorrow in the Ann
Arbor room of the Michigan
League. Sorority rush will begin
February 12.
Positions Open'
On 'Weekend'
Petitions for Engineers' Week-'
end chairmanships are presently
available in the East and West
Engineering Entrances.
Positions open include general
chairman and committee chair-
manships. Armin Jocz, '60E, presi-
dent of the Engineers' Council,
said. Petitions should be returned
by Dec. 11
Engineers' Weekend will be held
May 13 and 14.

t

MUSIC FOR J-HOP-Buddy Morrow and his orchestra will play
for the between-semesters all-campus formal dance. Morrow has
been playing his trombone since he was 12. He forimed his own
group in 1951 and rocked to fame soon after with his recording
of "Night Train."
On theJ

This weekend marks the begin-
ning of the rush of winter pledge
formals and parties.
However, one sorority has man-
aged to break into the social whirl.
Alpha Gamma Delta will hold a
"Basin Street Beat" party tonight
from 9 to midnight.
The Boll Weevils will provide
the music for the party, which
will take place at the house deco-
rated like a New Orleans night-
club, complete with flapper and
Mardi Gras costumed guests.
"Promenade in Pastels," the
Alpha Chi Sigma pledge formal,
will be held this evening from 9
until midnight at the Washtenaw
County Country Club.
Also at the Country Club to-
night is the Phi Sigma Delta
pledge formal, "Stardust." Bob
Elliott will provide the music.
Saturday, the pledges will give a
party foi the actives, the theme
remaining a secret until the party.
Al Blazer will furnish the music
at the Union Ballroom for the Tau
Delta Phi pledge formal, this eve-
ning at 7:30. Saturday night, the
house will be decorated for a
"Roaring Twenties" party.
Guests at the Chi Phi pledge'
formal will dance to the music of
Ray Louis. The dance will be held
tomorrow night, from 9 p.m. to
1 a.m. at the Chi Phi house.
The Zeta Psi house will have a
winter motif for the pledge for-
mal that is planned for Saturday
night, from 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. Earle
Pearson will supply the music for
dancing.
After their initiation, Delta Sig-
ma Pi pledges can enjoy them-
selves at the "Rose Ball" pledge
formal. The formal will be held
at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow evening at
the VFW Hall. with music by the
Kingsmen.

Bob Elliott will play at the
Union Ballroom for the: Sigma
Alpha Mu pledge formal, Satur-
day night from 7 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Alpha Kappa Psi will hold its
pledge formal at the League, Sat-
urday at 9:30 p.m., with music by
Dale Seeback. Before the dance,
they will have a party at the
house.
Dick Tilkin will play for the Pi
Lambda Phi pledge formal, to-
morrow night, at the Washtenaw
County Country Club.
Andy Anderson will play for a
party at the Nu, Sigma Nu fra-
ternity house Saturday:night.
Delta Upsilon pledges will hold
a barn party for the actives Satur-
day night from 9 to 1 a.zn. The
house will be decorated with a
rural theme, and music will be'
furnished by Al Blazer.
M~ake* Cottr'ell.
Office Head
Howard R. Cottrell, business
manager of the University's Flint
College, has been named to head
a new staff benefits office.
The office will combine admin-
istration of the retirement pro-
gram, group insurance, axr4 other
staff benefit services.
A program of information and
education will be developed to,
familiarize individuals and cam-
pus. groups with the various bene-
fit plans, Gilbert L. Lee Jr., Uni-
versity controller, explained..,.
Cottrell received bachelor's., and
master's degrees in business ad-
ministration from the University
in 1947 and 1950. In 1956 he',
joined the internal audit, staff
here and was appointed manager
for Flint College in 1957.

it

t

WESTMINSTER RECORDS
for Christmas
Regularly $4.98
now$ 298
now $2 each record
complete catalogue
HANDEL MESSIAH complete-- Scherchen
and London Philharmonic
TCHAIKOVSKY NUTCRACKER COMPLETE
BALLET- Rodzinski
MOZART REQUIEM MASS - Scherchen and
Vienna Symphony
BERLIOZ REQUIEM-Scherchen
BACH FOUR SUITES FOR ORCHESTRA -
Scherchen
BEETHOVEN CELLO SONATAS COMPLETE -
Janigro
BACH MASS IN B MINOR - Scherchen
and Vienna Symphony
COMPLETE ORGAN WORKS OF BACH -
Carl Weinrich
BEETHOVEN STRING QUARTETS -
Barylli Quartet
SCHUBERT STRING QUARTETS - Vienna
Konzerthaus Quartet
BACH MAGNIFICAT - Redel
BEETHOVEN ARCHDUKE TRIO
HANDEL - THE WATER MUSIC COMPLETE -
Sir Adrian Boult
MUSSORGSKY-- PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION
anRodzinski dm
and hundreds more IWO

.,

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GUITAR
WORKSHOPS
SATURDAY.

,

Organization
Notices

Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, cost luncheon discussion,
12 noon, Religious Journals Study
group, 6:45 p.m., Dec. 4, 524 Thompson.
Newman Club, Advent party can-
celled, open house instead, Dec. 4, Fr.
Richard Center.
* * *
Wesley Grads, discussion meeting,
Dec. 4, 8:30 p.m., First Meth. Church,
YouthRm. ' Speaker: Bob Marshall,
Marshall's Bookstore. Interested grads
welcome.

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U. of M. Folklore Society

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The stage sensation
is on the screen!

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SHOWS AT
1:00 - 3:30
6:15 - 8:52

DIAL
NO 5-6290

I I lip 1 Im i,

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THE INN,..
THE eUESTS...
THE
SENSATIONS
OF THE GREAT
BEST-SELLER
BY THE
AUTHOR OF
tTHE MAN IN"

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