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December 02, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-02

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4>

ANTARCTIC:
Countries
Sign Pact
For Peace

Neil

McElroy

ResgS

rI

As

Defense

Secretary

WASHINGTON (P) - The Ant-
arctic Pact - a pledge to keep
the great frozen continent at.
peace-- was signed yesterday and
greeted as a sign of thaw in in-
ternational relations.
Twelve nations, including the
United States and Russia, signed
the treaty that bans war bases,
nuclear explosions and missile
sites forever from a vast South
Polar region covering five million
square miles.
It dedicates Antarctica, where
Russia and the United States have
been the most active explorers, to
peaceful uses.
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
called the 2,500-word document
"an inspiring example of what
can be accomplished by interna-
tional cooperation in the field of
science and in the pursuit of
peace."
For the Soviet, Deputy Foreign
Minister Vasili V. Kuznetsov said
1 it reflected "a definite improve-
ment in international situations."
It is "additional evidence of the
fact that states, if they are ready
to cooperate, can successfully.
achieve through negotiations mu-
tually acceptable-solutions of in-
ternal problems in the interest of
international peace and progress,"
the Russian representative added.
Australia's ambassador Howard
Beale saw the treaty as a possible
model for other international
agreements-not only relating to
earth but "perhaps to the outer
marches of space itself."
One of the pact's most signifi-
cant aspects, United States offi-
cials said, is its provision for a
revolutionary system of interna-
tional inspection in Antarctica.
It gives each of the 12 nations
the right, on mere advance notice,
to check the other's installations,
equipment, ships and planes in
the Antarctic at any time.

Name Gates
To Succeed
At Pentagon
Period Sees Changes
In Military Concepts
WASHINGTON (-) - Neil H.
McElroy, the first space age Sec-
retary of Defense, resigned yester-
day and Philadelphia banker
Thomas Sovereign Gates Jr, was
promoted to the top P en t a g o n
post.
McElroy is returning to the soap
business after 26 months at the
helm of the Defense Department
-a period which saw:changes in
military concepts more drastic
than in any comparable period of
United States history.
In one of his last official acts,
McElroy announced the Adminis-
tration will ask Congress next Jan-
uary for money to keep B-52 long
range bombers aloft on an in-
creasedbalert when the military
chiefs determine Russia has a
substantial lead in intercontinen-
tal ballistic missiles.
Continue To Trail
At a farewell news conference,
McElroy conceded the United
States will trail Russia in big mis-
siles for the next three years.
Despite this, he spoke with con-
fident words of American capa-
bility to deliver nuclear destruc-
tion against any would-be aggres-
sor. He said this capability is sub-
stantially greater than when he
took office in late 1957.
As of today, he said, Russia and7
the United States have about the
same number of long range mis-
siles - a number he described as
quite small on both sides.
Augmented
McElroy also said the nation's
over-all strength has been aug-
mented with the furnishing of
more nuclear weapons to tactical
forces.I
"It is our belief that we are pre-.
pared for either nuclear or non-1
atomic limited war," the outgoing
defense chief declared.
Meeting with newsmen a fewI
hours after the !White House an-
nounced his resignation, McElroy
said he planned to end his gov-
ernment task last night, and wit-]
ness the swearing in of Gates to-
day at a ceremony in the execu-
tive mansion.
Gates, an investment banker in
private life, recently has been
serving as Deputy Secretary of
Defense.

SECRETARY AND SUCCESSOR - Neil McElroy (right) has re-
signed from his post as Secretary of Defense and will return to
his soap business. Successor to his Pentagon position is Thomas
Gates, a Philadelphia banker who has served as deputy Secretary
of Defense.
AROUND THE WORLD:
Air Force To Cut Back
On Big Bomber .Plan

0on
~Pe1

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The B70 heavy
bomber program, on which a half-
billion dollars has been spent, was
practically eliminated yesterday
by the Air Force.
Instead of going ahead with
plans to' build the big bomber as
a replacement for the present
B52S, the Air Force said it is go-
ing to turn out only one or two
test models of the B70, which is
designed to fly three times the
speed of sound.
Go on Trial .. .
HAVANA - Stretcher - bearers
carried a weeping American ex-
associate of Fidel Castro before
a military tribunal late yesterday
to defend himself against a pos-
sible death sentence.
He is accused of counter-revolu-
tionary activity.
Rafael Del Pino, 33, of Miami,
Fla., a Cuban-born naturalized
United States citizen wounded by
police bullets in his capture last
July, went on trial with Luciano
Lineras Gastell, who was a Ha-
vana policeman during Fulgencio
Batista's dictatorship.
The military prosecutor has de-
manded death for both defend-
ants.

GRAND RAPIDS:
Suggests
EXpansion
Of College
GRAND RAPIDS (A)-An edu-
cation expert strongly recom-
mends that early steps be taken
toward establishment of a public
four-year college in the Grand
Rapids area.
John X. Jamrich, Michigan
State University director of the
center for study of higher educa-
tion, reported Monday night be-
fore about 75 persons assisting a
special legislative committee
studying a need for such a college.
The group represents eight
counties surrounding Grand Rap-
ids.
"For such a college, I estimate
a student body of at least 4,000 to
6,000 by 1965 and 7,000 to 10,000
by 1975," Jamrich said.
He suggested that it be a sepa-
rate educational unit supported
and controlled by the state with
its own board of trustees rather
than be operated as a branch of
MSU or the University of Michi-
gan.
"This would be in the interest
of moving forward with the most
adequate and highest program of
higher education for this area," he
said. Jamrich envisioned the pro-
posed institution largely as "a
commuting school" without need
for dormitories and other facilities
for resident students.
He estimated it would draw
heavily from Grand Haven, Hol-
"land and Muskegon and suggested
that it be located slightly west
of Grand Rapids to be more ac-
cessible to the larger communities
involved.
ESee Russia
in 1960
Economy Student/Teacher summer
tours, American conducted, from $495.
Russia by Motorcoach. 17-days
from Warsaw or Helsinki. Visit rural
towns plus major cities.
Diamond Grand Tour. Russia.
Poland, Czechoslovakia, Scandinavia,
Western Europe highlights.
Collegiate Circle. Black Sea
Cruise, Russia, Poland, Czechoslo-
vakia, Scandinavia, Benelux, W. Europe.
K Eastern Europe Adventure. First
time available. Bulgaria, Roumania,
Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, West-
ern Europe scenic route.
See your Travel Agent or write
Maupintour&
400 Madison Ave., NewYork 17, N. Y.

Ike Prepares .. .
WASHINGTON - Government
officials passed the word yesterday
that President Dwight D. Eisen-
hower is getting ready to blast
both union and management for
not settling their steel industry
dispute.
Eisenhower was said to be choos-
ing stronger words than he has
used before, in his radio-television
speech to the nation tomorrow"
night.
-* * *
Launch Missile * *
CAPE CANAVERAL-An inter-
mediate range Thor missile was
lost at sea.
It was designed to take the first
high-altitude color pictures of the
earth.
* * *
Potter Declines .-,
WASHINGTON - Former Sen.
Charles E. Potter (R-Mich.) has
declined a White House offer of
an appointment to the United
States - Canadian Joint Commis-
sion.
He turned down the $20,000-a-
year post, Potter said yesterday,
because he wants to remain in
private business.

NOT EVEN CAN BEAT
loixrboii,
"CAROSEL"
TICKETS ON SALE FOR TONIGHT
THURSDAY EVE., SAT. MATINEE
$1.25-Lydia Mendelssohn Box Office
9 A.M.-5 P.M.

1~'

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(DuPont's Acrylic Fiber) in a smart
low-cut stylefor women. Perky bunny
porn trim. Softee soles. Sizes 9.11.
$4.50
YELLOW - GREEN

94 £ficign aU
Second Front Page
December 1, 1959 Page 3

COEDS
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easy-to-do hairstyles
for Fall will enhance
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