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December 02, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

Visiting Speaker Discusses
Cavour's Liberalism in Italy

FROM SQUARE ROOTS TO ART:
Honors Gives Math, Science, Renaissance Classes

EUGENE ORMANDY
... to conduct orchestra
'0 Preent
or the 25th consecutive year,
Philadelphia Orchestra will
rticipate in the May Festival
sented at the University May
6, 7 and 8 by the University
asical Society.
?reliminary plans announce that
emphasis on the virtuoso artists
the orchestra and the program-,
ng of significant orchestral
rks will honor the long associa-
i of the Philadelphia Orchestra
d the Uriversity Festival.
Eugene Ormandy, musical direc-
and William Smith, assistant
Iductor, will feature several
Icertos in their programs. The
wi concertmaster, Anshel Brusi-
v will perform Brahms' Violin
ncerto
The six-concert Festival, in its
h year will open with an all-
ethoven program Thursday, May
when pianist Rudolf Serkin
11 perform Beethoven's "Em-:
ror" Concert.

- By RALPH KAPLAN
"He had a special kind of liberal-
ism which never stopped him from
violating professed scruples," Prof.
Denis Mack Smith said of Count
Cavour yesterday.
Prof. Smith, fellow of Peterhouse
and history lecturer at Cambridge
University, gave "a deliberately
one-sided account" of the 19th
century leader who was instru-
mental in uniting Italy.
One of the common assumptions
about Cavour is that he acted with
the goal of Italian unity in mind,
Prof. Smith said. But "far from
planning it out, he had little or
no idea of where he was going."
Realism Makes Success
Realism and an excellent sense
of timing were responsible for his
success, Prof. Smith continued.
Cavour planned a large war, sup-
posedly to unify Italy, but in his
private correspondence spoke of
"the aggrandizement of Pied-
mont."
Another help to him was the
"un-Italian" part of his outlook,
he said. Cavour's Swiss and French
influences made him more Euro-
pean than Italian and he "imbibed
his political doctrines from the
July monarchy."
His French influence was espe-
cially strong and Prof., Smith
thinks he "studied France more

than Italy." He felt most at home
in northern Italy which "was in
spirit more a part of Europe," Prof.
Smith added. .
Writes First Paper
The paper Il Risorgimento was
Cavour's first medium for reform
ideas. Through the paper he ad-
vocated war with Austria in 1848
when the Milanese revolted against
the Austrians.
In Nov., 1852, he became Prime
Minister. In the subsequent years
Cavour created a "rubber-stamp"
parliament which hurt his en-
emies, Prof. Smith said.
These included the extreme
right, the left, the Catholic church,
and the king. Creation of this
Parliament is regarded as one of
his greatest acts as a politician.
In 1854 Cavour decided to in-
volve Piedmont in the Crimean
War. Although this has gone down
as one of his greatest moves, Prof.
Smith called it discreditable and
said it "had little aim in mind."

By DAVID SATTINGER
Prove that the, least - upper-
bound postulate follows directly
from the Dedekind-cut axiom.
Or, show that the square root of
two is irrational:
These problems are typical of
those being assigned by Prof. E. E.
Moise of the mathematics depart-
ment to the. 52 students in his

freshman honors math sequence,
'17h and 18h.
Although analytic geometry and
calculus constitute the primary
material covered, the relatively
high pace of work allows time for
investigation of topics not nor-
mally presented in beginning math
courses, Prof. Moise explained.
Thus the foundations of the real
number system' and a rather de-

Srgaiznation
Notices

a

Eastern Orthodox Students Soc., Dec.
3,,-7:30 p.m., Union, Rm. 3-D. Speaker:
Prof. F. Vidar, "Mt. Athos -- It's Mon-
asteries and Art."
La Sociedad Hispanica, meeting -
Concurso de Poesia, Runion, Dec. 3, 8
p.m., 3050 FB. Refreshcos. Bailes.
'* * *.
SNEA, meeting, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., Ed.
School Cafeteria. Speaker: Lt. George
Simmons (A.A. Youth Bureau).
Ulir Ski Club, first meeting, '/ec. 2,
7:30 p.m., Union. Rms. 3R and 3s. New
members, club plans, movies; refresh-
ments.
Univ. Coed Horseback Riding Club,
meeting, Dec. 3, 6:50 p.m., WAB. In-
formation,,: call NO 34'778.
Kappa Phi, meeting - "what Do
Methodists Believe," Dec. 3, 7:15 p.m.,
First Methodist Church, Green Rm.

The king tried to get rid of
Cavour by getting France to sign
a treaty which would involve Pied-
mqnt in the war. Cavour an-
nounced in Parliament that his
government= was trying to fight
the Crimean War.
In 1856, he decided to have a
European War which would op-
pose Austria and Piedmont, Prof.
Smith said.
His bravado' deluded' him into
thinking,however, that he could
fight Austria and England at the
same time. He persuaded France
to help him and war broke out in
1859.
At this time Cavour had occa-
sionally become the victim of al-
most delirious fits.
Causes Failure
In 1860 Cavour was responsible
for makirg the Villafranca Armis-
tice "a minor failure," he stressed.
Later that year he opposed Gari-
baldi's army and annexed part of,
the papal states.
During this, time Cavour was
idealized by Italian historians to
help him stabilize the regime and
make nationalism attractive to the
people. "He faced a difficult situa-
tion and made the best of it,"
Prof. Smith believes, "and had he
been a visionary idealist, Italy may
never have been unified."

FRESHMAN MATH-Prof. E. E. Moise of the mathematics. de-
partment instructs the freshman honors math sequence. Textbooks
are not used in the course, which covers analytic geometry,
calculus, real numbers and the theory of limits.
SGC:
Opens Staff Positionsg
For' StudentfPetitioning

}DIAL NO 5-62.90
every!
place
YU90
you'll
be
bearin
abou

'N

NOW

DIAL
NO 2-6264

By DONNA MOTEL
Several committee chairmanships
and staff positions on Student
Government. Council are open for"
petitioning. Nancy Adams, '60,
administrative vice-president, has
announced.
The position of Student Activi-
ties Committee chairman is avail-
able. This committee works in the
areas of campur affairs, calendar-
ing, recognition and early registra-
tion passes
The Ca-mpus Affairs group con-
ducts such projects as Willopolitan
and the Student Bicycle auction,
Miss Adams said.

DIAL NO 8-6416

0

I

Te stage sensation
is on the screen!
*p

The recognition group works
with prospective organizations to
see that they meet the require-
ments of SGC before they present
their petition tMbecome active.
.Prepares Calendar
The Calendaring Committee pre-
pares a balanced calendar which
is agreeable to all organizations
and approves events which are to
be calenclared. The chairmanship
of this group is open, she an-
nounced
Members of theEarly Registra-
tion Pass Committee work at the
beginning and the end of. the
semester to issue special registra-
tion passes to students who need
them. Tw' positions as members
of this committee are available.
The Education and' Student
Welfare Committee conducts a
forum program which operates to
bring interested speakers to the
campus, and'runs the Reading and
Discussion program. Currently it
is investigating independent study,
the Junior Year Abroad program,
and faculty-student relations. A
chairman is needed for thi4 com-
mittee.
Need Director
Another available position is that
of Elections Director. The duties
of the position are concerned with
publicity, 'assisting candidates in
their campaigning, enforcing elec-
tion rules, arranging for open
houses and conducting the elec-
tion itself.
Two staff positions are also
open. The Student Book Exchange
manager supervises collecting
books, arranging the sale and
working in the-office. The National
Student Association coordinator
tries to acquaint the Council and
the campus with projects and poli-
cies of NSA.
Petitions can be obtained at the
Student Activities Bldg. and must
be returned to Miss Adams' office
by Monday.

I

'I m INN...
ThE GuusTs...
THE SENSATIONS
OF ToE GREAT
BEST-SELLERI
BY THE AUTHOR OF
THE MAN IN TIE
GRAY "FLANNEL suir
TECHNICOLORO.
o BUGS BUNNY CARTOON

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I

Y~sot WARNER BROS. $68N
C ~ IRPCIAIRER
BIIR rrEBLOOM

--_

I

MICHIGAN UNION-S.G.C.

presents

I

A Debate on the

"MICHIGAN

FE

A

CIAL CRISIS"

,,

V

Sen..Clyde H. Geelings, Rep.
Chairman, Tax Committee

Sen. George C Steeh, Dem.

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