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December 01, 1959 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ThU MICHIGAN DAILY

ata Attempts To Answer
ident Christmas Requests
JUDITH OPPENHEIM
see .that some unselfish students
e bottom of Santa's mail asked for presents not for them-
from obviously schizo- selves, but for their friends and
c University students whose loved ones.
s had never been able to The girls in Markley want the
hemselves to destroy their world's most expensive cookbook
n's faith in the good little wrapped in solid gold leaf to give
dg.
ous to preserve the illu- to their cook.
of these delightfully naive A West Quad boy wants a dia-
:ts, Santa set out to an- mond-studded laundry bag with
heir requests as fully as silk tassles to send home to his
e, and is now looking for mother, and his roommate wants
)llowing items which the a dozen balls of grade A cashmere
ave thus far been unable to yarn and a set of knitting instruc-
the workshop: tions for a man's pullover sweater

i
5
s
C

Desire Sweater
ne black crewnecked. sweat-
for a beatnik student with
riginal design on it in espres-
tains, such as worn by the
t megalomaniac poet, G.I. Joe;
ft-handed guitar for a devoted
Young fan; an autographed,
her-bound edition of Genera-
a box of homemade .mush-
i cookies with cranberry icing
a homesick Outer Mongolian
ent; and a pair of turquoise
k absorbers for an esthetic
ber of the Air Force R.O.T.C.
has been practicing para-
e-jumping from Burton Tow-
Want Strange Gifts
though the nature of the gifts
ested was a little strange,
a was immensely gratified to

to give his girlfriend.
Ask 'Keepsakes'
Some sentimental people want
small keepsakes belonging to those
dear to them. In one touching
letter, a sweet coed said that all
she asked was a little pin with
Greek letters that was worn by
a boy she liked.
Santa was deeply touched by
this humble request as he was by a
student's plea for the little red
grade-book carried by an instruc-
tor he apparently admired greatly.
Two petitions Santa decided had
definitely been misaddressed.
These he transferred to another
department. One request was from
a frustrated co-ed who wanted
the lions to stop roaring. The
other was from a sophomore who
wanted a baby brother.

'SPIRIT:'
Ann Arbor
Christmas
Approaches
By RICHARD LYONS
Ann Arbor, during' the pre-
Christmas season, is the scene of
many different activities with
everyone on campus doing his best
to exemplify the "spirit of Christ-
mas" and anything else that
Christmas may stand for.
Throughout Haven Hall and in
the nooks and crannies where in-
structors dwell during the day the
spirit is affecting all with great
force.
Every instructor is busily work-
ing on presents for his classes so
that, when his students come
dragging into classes after slog-
ging through a foot and a half of
unplower snow or eight inch pud-
dles of mud. slush and rain water.
he will be able to greet them and
give them great joy by saying:
Close In
"I don't have many grades for
you this semester and as it is get-
ting close to exam time, I thought
that it would be a good idea . .."
In the evenings and on week-
ends" many of the students are
showing the effects of the good
spirits of the season and of the
bottle.
Even the beatnik crowd moves
out of the Union and into various
apartments around town where
they gather around modernistic
and symbolic Christmas trees sus-
pended from the ceiling to ex
change and drink their presents
and sing Christmas type folksongs.
More Toys
In the brick jungles of Uni-
versity Terrace and out in the
Northwood Apartments hundreds
of youngsters with the joys of
Christmas shining brightly in their
beady little eyes clamor loudly
and incessantly for thousands of
toys while their parents look won-
deringly at each other as they try
and decide who is going to tell
the kids that the rent must be
paid.
All these and more are parts of
that wondrous time, Christmas in
Ann Arbor

ANNUAL RENDITION-9,000 people are expected to hear the 81st annual performance of Handel's Messiah by the Choral Union. This year, the 200th anniversary of the
composer's death, the 300-voice choir will present the Messiah to more than 10 times as many as heard its premiere performance in a Dublin music hall. The Dec. 5
and 6 presentations will feature four guest soloists. These willbe Gladys Kriese, contralto; Saramae Endich, soprano; Yi-Kwei Sze, bass; and Charles O'Neill, tenor.
Lester McCoy, Choral Union musical director, will direct the performance.'
Overflow Crowd Hears Messiah's First Showing
.4y

PRACTICAL

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By ANITA PETROSHUS
Because "the ladies were induced
to come without hoops and the
gentlemen without swords," 700
persons heard the premiere per-
formance of Handel's "Messiah"
in a. Dublin music hall whose
usual capacity was 600 sworded
and hooped individuals.
This year, the 200th anniversary
of the composer's death, 9,000 per-
sons will hear Handel's great
sacred work as the 300-voice
Choral Union jheralds the coming
Christmas season with its 81st an-,
nual presentation of the oratorio,'
Dec. 5 and 6 in Hill Auditorium.
Guest soloists for this prelude
to the holiday seasons will be
Gladys Kriese, contralto, Saramae
Endich, soprano, Yi-Kwei Sze,
bass, and Charles O'Neill, tenor.
Lester McCoy will direct the per-
(ormance.
Gladys Kriese, from New York
City, has received recent recog-
nition in performances with the
Buffalo Symphony under Josef
Krips.
Hair Styling
to please you
at
715 N. University

Saramae Endich spent three
seasons at the Berkshire Music
Festival at Tanglewood, where she
was a soloist with the Boston
Symphony, and sang in the first
American performance of Cha-
brier's "An Incomplete Education."

Her voice was used by Leonard
Bernstein in two "Omnibus" tele-
casts to express both the modern-
ism of Schoenberg and the classi-
cism of Bach.
Yi-Kwei Sze appeared in the
1958 May Festival performance of

GIFT CYCLE:
Returns'Pos Problems

DRESS GLOVES-ALL LEATHER
Fleece Lined . . . . . $2.99
Fur Lined . . . . 3.95
Orion Lined . . . . . 3.95
Wool with Leather Face . . 2.49
Assorted Colors
SAM'S STORE
122 East Washington

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MONOMMUMNOR

.1
.1

By MAME JACKSON
What a swell gift! Just what
I've always wanted!
Sales people have reason to be-
lieve that some Christmas gifts
aren't "just what was always
wanted." For the nation's sales
personnel, Dec. 25 serves primarily
as the turnover point when cus-
tomers stop buying and start re-
turning merchandise.
Beginning Dec. 26, crowds of
people, predominantly women,
swarm into the stores into the
stres laoden with gifts, empty.
pocket books and complaints.
Distinct Groups
These grasping crowds may be
'divided into two distinct groups.
A young married woman is rep-
resentative of the first group. She
is usually the recipient of some
personal article of clothing which
her husband took great relish in
choosing. The young woman, more
budget conscious than her loving
spouse, quite often returns the
clothing in exchange for a less
expensive gift. She may even de-
sire a complete refund.
Very different from the first
group, the second and strongest
group is represented by almost ev-
eryone excluding those young
wives. The members of this group
return gifts mainly because they
can't convince themselves that the
sentiment is important-not the
gift.
Pose Problem
These are the people who pose
the biggest and most aggravating
problem to the sales personnel.
They return merchandise under-
every imaginable excuse. (How
many times have you, yourself,
said, "I already have several of
these," or "This doesn't seem to

fit quite right," or, if you happen
to be very honest, "I can't stand
this thing!"
People in this second group are
often surprised to find that their
gifts are not so expensive as they
had hoped. They are shocked to
find that their gift, however hot-
rible, once inhabited a bargain
table.
Many people disregard the cour-
tesy of promptness in returning
their merchandise. Clerks in some
stores complain of people return-
ing Christmas gifts as late as Oc-
tober or November of the follow-
ing year.
These gifts are sometimes re-
turned in the boxes of neighboring
competitors. It is not unusual for
people to return damaged, worn
or soiled articles in the hope of a
refund. Many times.people tear
identifying labels out of clothing
goods and attempt to return them
to other stores which do not even
carry the particular brand.
Return Gifts
A big share of the gifts returned
by women were originally bought
by men. Men tend to choose high
style, expensive gifts for women;
whereas, the women prefer a more
practical and basic line of gifts.
This particularly pertains to cloth-
ing.
When a man has made a mis-
calculation in "choosing the size
of a garment, he has usually cho-
sen a large size rather than one
that is too small. Many women
don't~ consider this flattering..
Prepared with many varying
reasons for exchanging their gifts,
crowds inevitably flood the stores
after Christmas to complete the
cycle of Christmas giving (and
exchanging).

"Samson and Delilah" with the
Philadelphia Orchestra,
A soloist with most of the na-
tion's leading symphonies, he has
appeared also with the New York
City and Philadelphia Grand Op-
era companies and the Robert
Shaw Chorale. He has sung the
"Messiah" with the New York
Oratorio Society.
Charles O'Neill, a first prize win-
ner on the Metropolitan Auditions
of the Air, made his operatic debut
in Fort Worth as Rhadames in
"Aida."
A 1952 winner of the Leonard
Warren scholarship, he has sung
with the Cincinnati, Connecticut
and WABC symphonies and the
Radio City Music.Hall Glee Club.
Lester McCoy, Choral Union mu-
sical director since 1947, is also
Guitar Music,
Holiday Songs
Go Together
"It's a great time to be a mem-
ber of the human race," as Al
Young, '60, expressed his opinion
of the Christmas season.
The leader of the Folklore So-
ciety asserted that guitar music
and traditional holiday songs def-
initely go together. The Folklore
Society plans to give a Christmas-
Chanukah sing on December 18
in Auditorium A of Angel Hall.
Last year the group held a sing
only, but this year it will be a
combination sing and concert.
The holiday theme will be com-
bined with an international flavor,
featuring church music of France,
Spajn, Italy and the Scandanavian
countries.
Participating groups will also
be from many countries. William
Olufemi Jones, of Africa, will play
bongos. Students from Venezuela
will perform and, from the local
area, Al Young's Washtenaw Val-
ley String Stretchers. This group
includes Bruce Bellenheimer, ban-
jo; Terry Letterman, guitar; Fe-
lix Pappalardi, also guitar.
Singers from the Folklore So-
ciety workshop will also take part
in the sing.

minister of music at the First
Methodist Church and conductor
of the Michigan Chorale.
Immediately after the "Messiah"
performances, the Choral Union
will begin rehearsals for the major
choral works to be presented at
the May Festival.
Interested singers may apply at
the University Musical Society,
offlce in Burton Tower for Union
membership beginning in January,
Gail Rector, Choral Union execu-
tive director said. Members are
selected by tryouts, and rehear-j
'sals are held every. Tuesday night
in Aud. A, Angell Hall,

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