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November 10, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

a THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,A Appoints Executive Vice-President

ACROSS CAMPUS I

FREDERICH SCHILLER-Subject of much discussion this week,
his bicentennial anniversary, the poet-dramatist has his own
display in the Undergraduate Library.
Firede rich Schiller
Discussedy ane
d b

The New York Pro Musica, per-
formers of medieval, renaissance,
and baroque music, will give a
concert at 8:30 p.m. tonight at the
Rackham Lecture Hall.
- The group, which consists of six
vocalists and four instrumentalists
conducted by Noah Greenberg, is
sponsored by the University Musi-
cal Society.
The program will include Eng-
lish madrigals, Elizabethian arias,
Renaissance sacred music, early
baroque cantatas, English instru-
mental music, and German -renais-
sance part songs.
Tickets are available at the
University Musical Society ticket
office in Burton Tower.
* * *
Robert Dolling Wells of Seattle
will speak on "Christian Science
Lifts the Burden of Mortality" at
8 p.m. today at the University
Elementary School Auditorium.
The lecture by Wells, a member
of The Christian Science Board of
Lectureship, will be held under the
auspices of the University's Chris-
tian Science Organizatiop. It will
be free of charge.
Tryouts for the Ann Arbor Civic
Theatre production of Shaw's
"Major Barabara" will be held
from 7:39-9:30 tonight, tomorrow
and Thursday in Rm. D210 of Ann
Arbor High School.
Students are invited to audition
for the cast, and rehearsals will
be scheduled to accommodate
those who will' be out of town
during Christmas holidays.
Fraternity
Narnes Fall
Pledge List
The following men are members
of the Phi Sigma Delta fall pledge
class:
Arthur Cohen, '62, Marshall
Friedman, '63, Richard Greenberg,
'63, Allen Gray, '63, Barry Kipnis,
'63E, Richard Landy, '63, Gerald
Lasky, '63, James Lipton, '63.
Also, Thomas Lipton, '63, Law-
rence Melamed, '63, David Miller,
'63, Peter Myerson, '62, Sol Pela-
vin; '63, Jeffrey Slone, '63, Ray-
mond Sneider, '63Ph., and James
Wechsler, '63.
These names were not includ-
ed in the list of fraternity pledges
run in The Daily last week.

"Major Barabara," directed by
Jerry Sandler, will be performed
Jan. 14, 15 and 16 in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
The Dramatic Arts Center will
present a program of readings at
8:30 p.m. Friday in Lane Hall.
Reginald Terry, Grad., will give
an interpretive , reading of selec-
tions by Dylan Thomas and D. H.
Lawrence, and the DAC Playread-
ing Group, diretted by Prof. Mar-
vin Diskin, will give a concert
reading of J. M. Synge's "Shadow
of the Glen" and the prologue to
Archibald MacLeish's "J.B."

Sat., Nov..14-8:30 P.M.
Ann Arbor Folk & Jazz Society presents
AN EVENING wasted WITH
TOM LEHUEB
ANN ARBOR HIGH -- ALL SEATS RESERVED
Tickets: $4.40, $3.30, $2.75, $2.20, $1.65 tax inc.
on sale at
BOB MARSHALL'S, 211 S. STATE

Dr. Zhivago'
Discussion
Postponed,
The "Dr. Zhivago" seminar has
been postponed to 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, in the Underclass Hon-
ors Lounge of the Undergraduate
Library.
The discussion, originally sched-
uled for 4 p.m. Thursday, will be
led by Prof. Marvin Felheim of
the English department. Prof. Fel-
heim will discuss the problem of
the artist within society as treated
in "Dr. Zhivago."

r

11

By MILDA GINGELL
The poetry of one of the greatest
of the German dramatists and
writers, Frederich Schiller, was
discussed yesterday in a sympos-
ium led by Prof. Martin Dyck of
the German department.
Prof. F. B. Wahr, professor
emeritus, opened the discussion by
declaring that Schiller was a cor-
nerstone of German culture.
"As a poet, I don't know if he
suits the tastes of the modern
generation, but he was one of the
foremost poets of German culture
and a great lyric poet of lis own
generation," Prof. Wahr continued.
He next brought up the ques-
tion: is Schiller great as a poet'
and is he a lyrical poet?
By discussion among panel mem-
bers and members of the audience
it was concluded that although he
has written several lyrical poems,
they lack depth and are too dis-
cursive.
Discuss Art
Emery George of the German
department said that "a work of
art tells us something about our-
selves and the world through an
emotional experience."
Elaborating on Schiller's effec-
tiveness, Prof. T. G. Winner of the
Slavic languages department said
that few Western writers and no
Western poet has had such a great
effect on Russia.
"At this time Russia was in need
of the revolutionary ideas and
asthetic theories of Schiller where-
as most nations had put these
qualities behind them; perhaps
this accounts for the wide accept-
DIAL NO 2-6264
'&Ends Wednesday

ance of his poetry in Russia," con-
tinued Prof. Winner.
Challenged Life
Prof. Wahr noted that Schiller
knew real life and that he chal-
lenged life. 'Although he led a
brooding life and felt impinged
upon and inhibited most of the
time, he built up a vision of a
better world to come.
He wanted philosophical free-
dom over political freedom, al-
though his poems may be inter-
preted to apply to political situa-
tions, he said.
Commenting on the emotional
nature of Schiller's works, Prof.
R. C. Blake of the psychology de-
partment said that Schiller was
strongest in his dramatic ability.
His plays are intensely emotional,
not just thought out, and the pres-
ent generation does not appreciate
his intense uncontrolled emotion-
alism."
Another panel member, Prof. G.
Cambon, visiting lecturer in the
English department, emphasized
the dramatic nature of Schiller's
poetry as opposed to its lyrical
qualities.
Plans Made
Other plans forcelebration of
the Schiller bicentennial include a
symposium to be held at 8:30 p.m.
today at the Cass Theatre in De-
troit. Prof. Dyck, along with fac-
ulty members of Wayne and Mich-
igan State Universities and the
University of Detroit will partici-
pate.
Prof. Mathijs Jolles of the Uni-
versity of Chicago will lecture on
Schiller at 4:15 p.m., Monday, in
Rackham Amphitheatre.
A Schiller exhibit is currently on
display in the lobby of the Under-
graduate Library.
LSA Position
On Committee
Now Available
Petitioning for membership on
the literary college steering com-
mittee is now open, Phillip Zook,
'60, has announced.
The petitions are available in
1220 Angell Hall, the Office of the
Assistant Dean, and must be re-
ceived by the committee no later
than noon Wednesday, Nov. 25.
Interviewing for the vacant po-
sitions on the committee will take
place after the Thanksgiving va-
cation.
'Te steering committee is com-
posed of undergraduate students
who meet once a week primarily
to discuss and evaluate literary
college policies and practices, par-
ticularly in the curriculum.

SOW DIAL
NO 8-64
, -r
Limited Engagement
TODAY THROUGH THURSDAY
MIDWEST PREMIERE
Special
ternationaMONG ,.
Week "Eloquent
ttraction 11 --Mich. Da

16
"
oily

mn
A

GILBERT and SULLIVAN
SOCIETY'S
"YEOMAN of the GUARD"

':

i

~R NI NNERSAL')NTERNATINAL PICTURE
S'.A ND s~ .

SA'NROCK HUDSON -LAUREN BACALL
ROBERT STACK. DOROTHY MALONE
ROBERT KEITH- A UNIVERSAL-INIERNATIONAL PICTURE
* Thursday *
"SAMSON & DELILAH"

Mori

modern 9azz
scow
featuring
Chris Connor
Dave Brubeck
Dave Lamber & his Quintette
Chico Hamilton & Quintette
Maynard Ferguson and
his four-piece orchestra

4

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