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November 08, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

__ THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY,

Program Notes

PROF. ABRAHAM HESCHEL
... to speak on Judaism
Heschel Set
As Speaker,
Prof. Abraham Joshua Heschel,
of the Jewish TheologicalSemin-
ary of America in New York Will
discuss "A Philosophy of Juda-1
ism," at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday in Aud,
B, Angell Hall.
The lecture, which is open to
the general public, is being spon-
sored by the Office of Religious
Affairs.
Prof. Heschel will also be ap-
pearing at 8 p.m. Tuesday to
speak informally and discuss with
listeners "Sanctification of Time."
Open to the public, the session
will be held at Hillel Foundation.
"The Sabbath," "Man Is Not
Alone" and "God in Search of
Man'" are among the works pub-
1is h e d by the internationally
known scholar, author and lectur-
er. Also a noted linguist, Prof.
Heschel has written in Hebrew,
German, Polish and Yiddish as
well as in English.
The professor of Jewish ethics
and mysticism came to the United
States in 1940 from Warsaw where
he had been teaching for a year.
He had been forced by the ris-
ing power of Nazism to leave Ger-
many in 1939.

By MILDA GINGELL
With the exception of the New
York Pro Musica concert, the cul-
tural scene in Ann Arbor is quiet
this week, but only in preparation
for a full week of programming.
This group of six vocalists and
four instrumentalists' performs
medieval, renaissance and baroque
music.
The group, under the direction
of Noah Greenberg, will give their
concert at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday
in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
The Ann Arbor Folk and Jazz
Society will present satirist and
singer and all-round "funny man,"
Tom Lehrer at 8:30 p.m. Saturday
at the Ann Arbor High School.
Next Sunday, the Pamploma
Choir from Spain will sing 'a ca-
pella' in the Choral Union Series
concert at Hill Aud.
The Choir is describedras a
"group of angels" and an orches-
tra composed of voices.
As a bonus to Playbill season
ticket holders, the speech- depart-
ment with the school of music will
present Donizetti's opera, "Don
Pasquale" on Nov. 19-21.
* * *
Three outstanding personalities
will be at Hill Aud., Thurs., Nov.
19: Bette Davis and Gary Merrill
with guitarist and singer, Clark
Allen. Through readings, actions
and songs, the three will interpret
"The World of Carl Sandburg,"
which received wide acclaim when
it opened last week in the East.
* * *
From Ann Arbor to Detroit: De-
troit's newest art exhibit area, the
Open Door Gallery, 18090 Wyo-
ming, will open today with the
showing of the works of Ann Ar-
bor artist and sculptor, Nelson
Howe.
* * .
A special benefit concert of the
Detroit Symphony Orchestra con-
ducted by Paul Paray and featur-
ing violin soloist, Jack Benny, will
be given at 8:30 p.m. Friday at the
Ford Aud.

Philharmonica Hungarica, the
80-member symphony orchestra
born of the Hungarian revolution,
will give a concert at 8:20 p.m. to-
morrow at the Masonic Temple.
"The Pink Jungle," the musi-
cal-comedy thrust at the idols of
the cosmetics industry, opens
Thursday at the Shubert.
Leslie Steven's play stars Ginger
Rogers with Agnes Moorehead;
Leif Erickson adds the romantic
interest.
A major. event of the Detroit
theatre season will take place
when Friedrich Schiller's "Mary

To Give Talk
On Advances
In Synthesis,
Prof. Robert Woodward, of Har-
vard University, willdeliver the
fourth annual Werner Bachmann
Memorial Lecture in chemistry at
4:10 p.m. tomorrow in the Natural
Science Aud.
His topic, "Recent Advances in
the. Chemistry of Natural Prod-
ucts," is becoming a virtual tradi-
tion for the chemist whose work
in the laboratory synthesis.of nat-
urally occurring substances is well
known among the world's chem-
fists.
Prof. Woodward prefers to re-
veal the exact subject of his talks
at the last minute and they most
often involve the new synthesis or
structure determination- of a nat-
ural product.
His familiarity with the field is
first hand. Such widely-known
products as quinine, reserpine,
strychnine, cholesterol and corti-
zone are among the many sub-
stances he has been the first to
synthesize.
Builds Substances
The process of synthesis in-
volves the building of complex
substances from laboratory chem-
icals in order to supplement the
supply that can be obtained from
natural products.
Prof. Woodward, for example,
discovered a laboratory process to
"make" reserpine, a basic drug in
a number of tranquilizers. Before
his work, the chemical could -only
be obtained by extracting it from
plants of the Rauwolfia family.
Prof. Woodward's "stock in
trade," University chemists re-
port, "has been a detailed under-
standing of the mode of action-of
reagents used in synthesis." He
has thus achieved "amazing" re-
sults in choosing a specific reagent
to direct the atoms of the' mole-
cule under study.
Gives Control
This gives him a high degree of
control over the reacting sub-
stances in his work.
Born in Bostonin 1917, he re-
ceived his bachelor of science de-
gree from Massachusetts Institute
of Technology in 1936 and his
doctorate there in 1937.
Prof. Woodward joied the
Harvard faculty in 1947 and since
1953 has served as the Loeb Pro-
fessor of Chemistry.
His speech here is part of a lec-
ture series sponsored by the Uni-
versity in honor of the late Prof.
Werner Bachmann of the chem-
istry department who was one of
the world's leading chemists until
his death in 1951.
Prof. Bachmann's work dealt to
a great extent with large free
radicals, the fundamental parts of
a compound, and his findings up-
set some widely-accepted theories
of the time.

it

YARNS, PATTERNS
and Knitting Sup-pliles
YARNCRAFT SHOP
10 NICKELS ARCADE Phone NO 2-0303

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Full stock of

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and,
Monday

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NO 8-6416

"A TRULY GREAT, ORIGINAL
PICTURE FROM INDIA-!
"At long intervals over the years there have been a few, totally
unexpected, unforgettable films that attempt and achieve a
reality strikingly different from contemporary efforts. Such a
picture is PATHER PANCHALP'... A Film to be treasured,
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-Archer Winsten, N. Y. Post
* * Hits you right in the
-Wanda Hale, N. Y. Post

"UNUSUAL . . . remarkably sensitive'.'
-Paul V. Beckley, N.Y. Her. Trib.
"RARE EXOTIC IMPORT."
-Bosley Crowther, N. Y. Times
"STUNNINGLY BEAUTIFUL."--Time

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'Beautifully made . .. drama is engrossing, performance
superb." -Crowther, N.Y. TIMES
"Hardly fit to be a teachcer for growing boys, even a
teacher of classical languages, which he is." -Ibid.
TERRENCE RATTIGAN'S
The Browning Version
with MICHAEL REDGRAVE
JEAN KENT
SHORT: A City Decides
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents
_ . ara ~

PAUL PARAY
... to accompany Benny
Stuart" opens at the Cass Theatre
on Nov. 24.
The Sol Hurok production is
under the direction of one of
America's most distinguished stage
directors, Tyrone Gutherie.
* * *
Beginning Friday, Wayne State
University Theatre will present
Oscar Wilde's farce, "The Import-
ance of Being Earnest."
Organization1
Notices
Alpha' Phi Omega, pledge meeting,
Nov. 9, 7 p.m., 2528 SAB.d
Am. Chem. Soc., luncheon meeting,
Nov. 10, 12 noon, 3003 Chem.
* * * -
Congregational, Disciples, E,& .R Stu-
dent Guild, Grad. discussion group,
Nov. 9, 8 p.m.
* * *
Gamma Delta -- Luth. Stud. Club,
supper an dmovie "A Place To Go,"
Nov. 8, 8 p.m., 1511 Washtenaw. Inter-
national students invited as guests.
Hillel Fdn., Israeli folk dance group
at 2 p.m., Supper Club at 6 p.m., Nov..
8, 1429 Hill.
Ss . ,
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Nov.
9, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB. Cafe y conversa-
cion -
Luth. Stud. Assoc., program, Nov. 8,
7 p.m.. Hill St. and S. Forest. Speaker:
Dean R.o. Long, Wittenberg Univ.
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Nov. 8, 4
p.m., Lane Hall. Speaker: Dr. K. Kant-
zer; Wheaton College Prof., "Why is
Christianity Unique?"
s * *
Phi Mu Alpha -. Sinfonia, meeting,
Nov. 8, 8 p.m., Union, Bin. -3N.
* s' r
Ukrainian Club, meeting, Nov. 10, 9:30
p.m., Madelon Pound Hse., Hill and E.
Univ. Sta.
Michigras '80, first meeting of the
booths comm., Nov. 9. 4 p.m., Union,
Rm. 3D. For those that signed up at
the mass meeting and all others inter-
ested.

STARTS
TODAY

HA

TWO
ENCORE
HIT$

..
...
'
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f
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. ,,. "
t;
...
I

TOM LEHRER
coming Nov 14
tickets on sale now
at
Bob Marshall's

11

I A UNIVERSAL-INTERNATIONAL PICTURE
ead and Use Michigan Daily Classifieds

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DIAL NO 5-6290'

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DOORS OPEN AT 12:45
SHOWS CONTINUOUS FROM 1 P.M.
STARTING AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

COMING! IN PERSON! NOV.19
STUDENTS-30% DISCOUNT ON ALL TICKETS
_ ..Bette Davia tour loomsas year's top dramatic event." VERNON sCOT, U...

Happy Movie History! Gable acts his age!
He doesn't get the girl but how he gets those
laughs...in the freshest, most hilarious
comedy that ever put the accent on youth!
(larkGable +||arroll afaker
li0i aner Lee J obb
"B* .
mof
Me

4'

ARMANDDEUTSCH & JUDDBERNARD
IN ASSOCIATION WITH NORMAN CORWIN PRESENT

Bette Davis)
GaryThe World.
of Carl
Sandburg"
Adapted & Directed by IORMAN CORWIN
Based on the works o CARL.SANDBURG

.

-A

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