100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

"t7 11Y'"ir1" t fAfQw l~w r w

"E TC TA II. V " %fENS

D,%Y. NOVEMBER 4, 1959

9

iAACP To View Northwestern; Cornell Bans Hazing
By VANCE INGAILLS I, r

WEEKEND OF WORK:
Experimentalist Explains
Short-TermC ourses'

-David Giltrow
HYDE PARK--Topics ranging from the seal on the Diag to world1
capitalism were aired on the Diag yesterday.
Hyde Park Dissertations,
Touch on Many Areas

I

4

(Continued from Page 1)

I

Regents' ruling gives SGC the
power to throw housing groups
off campus, he said, it is the na-
tional organizations that are re-
sponsible for discrimination.
A current SGC member gained
the stand and howled, "The Daily
said on Sunday that we can't sup-
port these 12 SGC candidates and
on Tuesday it said to support
them."
"If The Daily was mistaken and
irresponsible on Sunday, it could
be mistaken and irresponsible on
Tuesday as well," the irate SGC
member cried.
"How about incompetence in
SGC?" a spectator piped up.
'Best of Bad Lot'
"SGC is the best of a bad lot
of student organizations," was the
reply, "whether it be IHC, IFC,
The Daily, League-
Members of SGC should not
represent their own opinions, he
went on, or even reflect those of
the campus at large, because the
campus doesn't have one.
"The campus elects a govern-
ment to make its opinions," he
maintained. "And on SGC, I do
what I think best for the Univer-
sity community as a whole."
Laments Diag Benches
Another student jumped on the.
stand anxious to air his major
complaint: the four benches sur-
rounding the seal on the Diag.
"What has happened to tradi-
tionalism?" he cried, referring to
the implication of freshmen flunk-
ing exams if they step on the seal.
After this brief respite, SGC
again took the spotlight.
One candidate declared the cam-
paign rules make it -almost im-
possible to get ideas across in SGC
open houses-the candidate runs
in and out.
Runs on 'Things'
"I am running on four things,
not ideas: responsibility, maturity,
cooperation and consideration."
The crowd immediately asked
him to define his terms.

His reply was interrupted, so he
,skipped this and began advo-
cating, eliminating some of the
events on the overcrowded calen-
dar.
"Education here is becoming
more difficult," he insisted. "Stu-
dents will soon have to put out a
third more effort for the same
grade. If we don't stop calendaring
events, the administration will
take away the students' power to
-do this."
Against Drinking Laws
One student gained the platform
and shouted that the University
drinking law should say the Uni-
versity knows it cannot hope to
enforce the drinking age and that
only the students, acting undesir-
ably will 'be penalized.
"The University cannot expect
to do any niore than this," he con-
cluded.
Skipping to another topic and
another speaker, one student ex-
claimed that when the state and
school take away our gambling
privileges, it is time to do some-
thing.
"I would like to see a represen-
tative from every class hold a
meeting to organize betting.
"From here we can organize the
entire Big Ten," he cried.
'Playing Politics'
Next subject on the stand was
the state financial crisis. One stu-
dent declared that the "whole
Legislative crowd is playing poli-
tics."
An SGC candidate urged stu-
dents to write home to parents
telling them to write to the legis-
lators about supporting the school.
Finally, one serious minded stu-
dent drew a gathering and ex-
pounded on democracy and capi-
talism.
"If the capitalistic system failed
in the U.S., it should not hinder
our devotion to democracy."
"I am not satisfied with the
economic structure of any place
in the world," he continued, "but
we have better tools to correct ours
than anywhere else."

By NORMA SUE WOLFE
Forty-eight hours is a suffi-
ciently long period to teach the
essence of any subject from the
art of metal 'working to analysis
of a Beethoven Quartet or Shake-
speare, an English experimentalist
in adult education believes.
Sir George Trevelyan, warden
of Shropshire Adult College near
Shrewsbury, England, explained
the function of "short - term
courses" in a lecture here Monday.
"The short-term residential col-
lege. acts as a yeast in people's
lives," Trevelyan said.
Just as yeast works rapidly
through a loaf of bread, brief
courses can "leaven the whole life
of an individual," he believes.
.Offered to All
At the Shropshire Adult Col-
lege, courses are offered to any
adult "from any walk of life." The
students there need no qualifica-
tions for admittance, gain no
credits and take no tests.
But 48 hours is a highly sig-
nificant length in the course of a
person's life, Trevelyan asserted.
He cited the example of an
analysis of Beethoven's Quartet-
Opus 59 No. 3, which was offered
this past weekend at Shropshire.
Trevelyan called the study "a
strange experience--a hiatus out
of time."
At'the end of the program, stu-
dents are "swept away by under-
standing," he claimed. Eventually,
the adults "kick out of it and go
home, but they are changed and
enriched.
Adds Depth
"Possession of knowledge of the
Quartet makes them deeper per-
sons," Trevelyan said.
Shropshire College Is one of 20
residential colleges in England de-,
signed to resolve two problems at
once, he explained. The first is the
post-war interest in adult educa-
tion and the second, a means of
preservation of "great houses,"
which could not be financially
supported.
Trevelyan and other inspired
educators'combined the problems
and found a solution: conducting
courses in an "atmosphere fitting
for adult education,"-the coun-
try houses.
Number 65
A maximum number of 65 stu-
dents move into the houses for a
weekend of study, which "begins
with tea on Friday and ends with
tea Sunday." Instructors, who are
borrowed from "anywhere" and
rewarded with a "modest salary,"
must have both academic knowl-
edge and the power to talk, Tre-
velyan said.
These talks are not, "watered-
down university lectures," he
stressed. "There is a form of lec-
turing that is an art in its own
right- finding ideas which will
fire the imagination and deepen
the vision of all adult students."
These students and instructors
are all "fired by the notion of
gathering people together in fine
architecture for intellectual crea-
tivity," he added.
"Our obvious purpose, then, is
Group Fills
JGP Positions
All central committee positions
for the Junior Girls Play have
been filled, Doris Jay, '61, general
chairman of JGP announced yes-
terday.
The Interviewing and Nominat-
ing Committee of the League has
named Ann Cromwell. '61, as as-
sistant general chairman, Susan
Kreisler, '61, as head of campus
publicity, and Anne Wells, '618M,
as music chairman.
The musical-comedy to be pre-
sented on March 17, 18, 19 is
"What Can You Lose," an original
production written by the junior

to stir imaginations--to touch the
humanities that appeal to all sorts
of people, from nobility to the
country people who claim, 'Well,
dash it, I haven't read a book for
20 years.'"
Trevelyanr said he can usually
predict attendance at various pro-
grams through implementing the
philosophy of a "quest for the more
permanent knowledge." Archaeol-
ogical -and practical art courses
attract a full house, while music
might yield a response of 50 adults,
Shakespeare 40 and discussions on
single books or current affairs only
12 to 15.
"An aged: man is but a paltry
thing unless the soul clap its
hands and sing, and therefore I
sailed' the seas. . . ." Trevelyan
quoted' in conclusion.
Plan Panel
Discussion
A panel discussion, "A Looking
Glass of Conflicting Goals," will
be held at 7:15 p.m., today, in the
Hussey Rm. of the League.
Those participating will be Uni-
versity President Harlan Hatcher,
Dean of Women Deborah Bacon,
Dean of the-literary college Roger
Heyns, and Assistant Dean of
Nursing, Mrs. Norma Marshall.
The discussion is part of "Wom-
en's Week," lasting from Monday
through this Sunday.
Architect .Set
Center. Plans
Milton Fischer, a partner of the
Washington, D.C. architectural
fim, Corning and Moore, ,will ex-
plain his approach to the solving
of an architectural problem at 3
p.m. today in the auditorium of
the architecture building.
The example to be cited in his
lecture is a new' educational cen-
ter of the American Association of
University Women in Washington,.
Contract documents, which are
displayed in the exhibition spaces
of the building, depict the coor-
dination of the ideas of 150,000
members of the AAUP.
Fischer received his Bachelor of
Architecture from the University
in 1933, and was awarded a schol-
arship of the Erhard foundation.
He is a member of the American
Institute of Architects and of the
American Institute of Planners.
He has previously been associat-
ed with Henry Wright, Fellow of
the AIA and the National Hous-
ing Agency.
His principal works include the
award-winning B'nai Brith Build-
ing and the Maryland National
Park and Planning Commission
Building.

s
1

-w

TH UR., FRI.,
"Smartest Comedy
of the ason"

SAT.

DIAL 5-6290

HELD OVER
AGAIN
(Through Saturday)'
The picture' with what it takes to
be a real big hit in Ann Arbor!

1

FOR THE MAN WHO HAS EVERYTHING
... AND THE GIRL WHO WOULD LIKE TO ...,

;-(N.Y. Daily Mirror)
NOEL COWARD'S
"NUDE
WITH
VIOLIN"
directed by Wn. Taylor

IN EASTMAN COLOR
CII EMASCOP9

TONY RANDAL.
THELN RJER

girls.

_:

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Presents
mTonte Car/o ai
CAMPUS-WIDE DANCE
Gambler's Paradise
PRIZES - REFRESHMENTS -GAMES
Music by DICK TILKIN
9-12 Sat., Nov. 7 Union Ballroom
Tickets available on the Diag, at
Engine Arch, International Center,
and the Union.

ORCHESTRAS
by.
BUD-MOR
featuring
Johnny Harberd Men of Note
Dick Tilkin Bob Elliott
Andy Anderson Al Bloser
Vic Vroam Earle Pearson
The Kingsmen Dale Seeback
plus many others
11103 S. Univ. NO 2-6362

Produced by
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE,
Inc.
All seats reserved
Thur. $1.50, Fri. & Sat. $1.65
Box office open.10:30-5:30
Phone NO 8-63000
LYDIA
MEN DELSSOH N
TH EATRE

4

I

I

U

-, I

TOMORROW

THE YOUNG DEMOCRAT CLUB

I

I

ENDING
TONIGHT

oyam

PRESENTS

-A

DIAL
NO 2-6264

.o MRY WAD'S mhtfa

PH4l ID A HART

E HOPE LMNE

.

..A

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan