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October 29, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SIGMA THETA TAU :

rganization
Notices

Nursing Honor Society
Inducts 22 Members*

.,
F.

coffee hour, Oct. 30, 4 p.m.
Grad. Outing Rm. Speaker:
Claude, PollI. S. Dept.
. . *

------ I

a'i Stud. 'Group, informal discus-
of "The Foundations of Faith,"
29, 8:30 p.m. 517 Oswego. Every-
s welcome.
* * *
istian Science Organization, regu-
estimony meeting, ;Oct. 29, 7:30
Lane Mall, Fireside Rm.
* * *
pa Phi, pledge meeting at 7 p.m.;
et meeting at 7:15 p.m.; Oct. 29,
Methodist Church.
a ,Club, organisational meeting,
19, 7:15 p.m., WAB.
bbard and Blade, meeting, Oct.
30 p.m., Union, Rm. 3K.
* *+*
v. Coed Horseback Riding Club,
ng, Oct. 29, 6:50 p.m., WAB. Forj
nation, call NO 3-7778.

Rho Chapter of Sigma Theta
Tau, the national honor society
for nursing, inducted 22 members
last night in its first initiation
ceremony.
Carolyn Beall, '61N, Donna Bur-
ley, '60WN, Barbara Carlson, '61N,
Nancy Danielson, '60N, and Joan
Dudl, '60N, were received as mem-
bres. Also inducted were Sue Glas-
gow, '61N, Rosann Gobetti, '61N,
Dorothy Graham, '60N, Linda Hir-.
atsuka, '61N, and Florence John-
ston, '60N.
Other .new members include in-
structor Joan Kemper, Mary Kot-
ting, '60N, Sue Laidlaw, '60N, Ju-
dith Lenaway, '61N, and Sharon
Mail, '61N. Other initiates were
Ellen McDonald, '60N, Prof. Eliza-
beth Miskl, Sally Parker, '60N, Jo-

Anne Ricciardi, '61N, Mary Spies,
'60N, Nancy Thorne, '60N, and
Linda Vance, '62N.
At a dinner meeting before the
insatllation ceremony, Dean Rho-
da Reddig, of the nursing school,
spoke on the responsibility of
nurses to the profession and to so-
ciety.
President is Judith Tingley,
'60N; vice-president, Judith John-
son, '60N; secretary, Donna Tigi-
laar, '60N; and treasurer, Prof.
Laurence Souza, the only male
member of the organization.
Laura Gulbrandson, an instruc-
tor, is archivist. Faculty counsel-
ors Prof. Agnes Love, assistant
dean of the nursing school, and
Prof. Margaret Martin.

Haber Leads
Local Attack
Against Bias
(Continued from Page 1)
After this, the representatives
will return to their respective cam-
puses and organize their programs.
The Political Issues Club has
already discussed possibilities for
the University's problem area, Ha-
ber said. "We plan to take on the
student housing problem," he
noted, "and problems affecting all
minority groups."
Several student church groups
are already working on Ann Arbor
housing discrimination problems,
he explained, and there has been
a little work within the community
as well.
University housing discrimina-
tion problems will also fall within'
the group's concern, although they
are harder to deal with than the
community offenses.
"It is hartler to find a clear case
in a residence hall, where abuses
are more covert," Haber asserted,
"It is difficult to judge how, much
is circumstance, how much policy."
Sometime during the year, prob-
ably as an outgrowth of the Con-
ference, a booklet will be pub-
lished, organizing the Conference
material to serve as a "practical
field guide for people interested in
discrimination," Haber said.

Scientific, Artistic Creation

P.Gr uziomx ul IiO1Es
Prof. Gerard Composes

NURSES CONVENE--At a three-day convention of the Michigan
State Student Nurses' Association, two University coeds were
elected to offices. The purpose of the convention is to enable
student nurses to. become acquainted with problems of the
profession.
State Student Nurses' Group
Gives Recognition to T'U Coeds

.Thecreative processes of artists
and scientists were recently com-
pared by Prof. Ralph W. Gerard
of the physiology department.
"Both the artist and the scien-
tist are involved in all creativity,"
he said. "Perhaps an important
difference between the artist and
the scientist is that mood weighs
more heavily with the former and
patterned reason with the latter."
From his own scientific point of
view Prof. Gerard sees the artist
as somehow "oppressed" by the
view of a blank, white surface un-
til he marks the blankness.
"From then on," Gerard said,
"the creator and his creation con-
tinue to interact. A composition
grows as it is produced, Just as
ideas are formulated while being
expounded, and as characters run
away with their authors. The cre-
ation thus lives' and has its own
embyrology and growth.
He described the growth of an
abstract painting: "A horizontal
form will just become vertical, a
composition in' blues insists on
suggesting fog-shrouded ships on
the sea."
Tying this in with science, Ger-
ard noted, "'These painters see
their creations as entities; as
structure and, dynamics; making

U

PROF. RALPH GERARD
.discusss reation

WHILE YOU WAIT -

"'bra
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'mow
ti {
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.z" ' +

BIKE

Two University student nurses
gained recognition in the Michi-
gan State Student Nurses' Asso
ciation meeting this month.
Ginger Schaefer, '60N, and Vik-
ki Kling, '60N, members of the 30-
member delegation of Washtenaw
County who attended the three-
day convention, were elected sec-
ond vice-president and nominat-

ing committee member respective-
ly.
Explaining the purpose of the
annual convention, Sharon Mail,
'6IN, said it was primarily to ac-
quaint student nurses with the
problems of the nursing profession
and to acquaint them with stu-
dent nurses from other schools.

progress in time, and develop-
ment, but without fixed beginning
or end; with spatial patterns or
rhythms, but not framed by a for-
mal boundary."
Like the biologist, the artist
sees his work as a living, growing
organism, he concluded.

r
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The Daily Official Bulletin, is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1959
VOL. LXX, NO. 33
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: Fri., Nov. 20. Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than Nov. 10. Please
submit nineteen copies of all com-
munications.
The Dept. of Speech will present an'
admission-free performance of Moliere's
"The High Brow Ladies" on Thurs.,
Oct. 29 at 4:00 p.m, in Trueblood Aud.,
Frieze Bldg.
Flu Shot clinics for students, staff
and employees will be held in Rm.58
(basement. of the Health Service)
Thurs., Oct. 29. Hours are 8:00-11 :30
a.m. and 1:00-4:30 p.m. Proceed directly
to basement, fill out forms, pay fee
$1.00 for students and $1.50 for staff
and employees) and receive injection.
It is recommended that each person
receive two injections, 2-3 weeks apart.
The clinics will be open for both first
and second shots.
International Center Tea: Thurs.,
Oct. 29 from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. at the
International Center. All students wel-
come,
i OPEN STOCK
BOYCE PHOTO CO.
723 N. University

I Choral Union Members are reminded
to pick up their courtesy passes for,
the concert by Irmgard Seefried to-
night -- during the hours 9:00 to 11:30
and 1:00 to 4:30 - at the offices of the
University Musical Society in Burton
Tower.
Physical Education -- Women: Wo-
men students who have not completed
the physical education requirement
should register for the first winter sea-
son on Thurs., Oct. 29 from 6:00 to 9:00
p.m. and Fri., Oct. 30 from 8:00 a.m. to
12 noon, main floor, Barbour Gymna-
sium. Students registering in the ever-t
ing please use the basement entrance
to the building.
Medical College Admission Test: Can-
didates taking the Medical College Ad-
mission Test. on Sat., Oct. 31 are re-
quested to report to Rm. 140 Bus. Ad-
min. Bldg. at 8:00 Sat, morning.
Astronomy Dept. Visitors' Night: Fri.,
Oct. 30, 8:00 p.m., Rm. 2003 Angell
Hall. Dr. Martha Liller will speak on
"Galaxies," After the lecture the Stu-
dent Observatory on the fifth floor of
Angell Hall will be open for inspection
and for telescopic observations of Sat-
urn,. Double Star, and Andromeda Gal-
axy. Children welcomed, but must be
accompanied by adults.
Tonight: Eugene LaBiche and Marc-
Michel's "Horse Eats Hat" ("An Italian
Straw Hat"), a farce with songs, 8:00
p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. Tick
eta for all Playbill 1959/60 productions,
including "Horse Eats Hat", available
at the theatre box office today, 10-8.
Lectures.
Harvey M. Letbenstein, econorics
professor from the University-of Cali-
fornia will speak on "Escape from
Economic Backwardness, An Examina-
tion of Three Viewpoints," Thurs., Oct.
29 at 8:00 p.m., in the Rackham Amphi-
theater. This is the second of the guest
lecture series.
Concerts
Concert: Irmgard Seefried, soprano of
the Vienna Opera, will be presented in
the third concert in the Choral Union
Series, Thur's., Oct. 29, 8:30 p.m., in Hill

Aud. She will present a program of
music by Beethoven, Mozart, Schu-
mann, Schubert, and Hugo Wolf, with
text 'by Goethe; ,with Paul Ulanowsky
at the, piano. A limited number of
tickets are available at the offices of
the University Musical Society daily.
On the night of the concert, tickets
may be purchased at the Hill Auditor-
ium box office after 7:00 o'clock.
Academic Notices
Woodrow Wilson Fellowships. Nomin-
ations for Woodrow Wilson fellowships
for the academic year 1960-61 for first
year graduate work leading to a 'career
in college teaching ar'e due- Oct. 31.
Only faculty members may nominate
candidates.m Letters of nomination
should be sent to Prof. Dudley Williams,
Graduate School, the Ohio State Uni-
versity, 164 W. 19th Ave., Columbus 10,
Ohio.
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Prof.
A. E. Heins will speak on "Singular
Integral Equations: Introduction and
the Cauchy Theory," Thurs., Oct. 29,
at 4:00 p.m. in Rm. 246 W. Engrg. Re-.
freshments will be served at 3:30 p.m.
in Rmn.27'4 W. Engrg.
D o c to r a l Examination for Jeree
(Continued on Page 4)

The KNIT & WEAR
220 South Fourth Ave.
(Next to Montgomery Ward)
WE CARRY A COMPLETE SELECTION OF
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MOHAIR * KNITTING WORSTED ANGORA
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SEE OUR IMPORTED SKI SWEATERS FROM
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NO 2-0035

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
ELECTRICAL and ELECTRONIC
ENGINEERS
A newly organized Southern California Corpora-
tion is being staffed with competent engineering
personnel who will participate irr the following
programs.
* Weapon System Documentation
* System Design Evaluation
" Missile Handling Equipment Design
* Research and Development

I

pennies!\ I/
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Washed and tinned -.
Only 30c Each
KYER MODEL LAUNDRY
AND CLEANERS
627 S. Main St. 1023 Ann-St.
Phone NO 3-4185

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salary will be paid
for ambitious, intelli-
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graduates.

POTENTIAL: Oppor-
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INTEGRITY: Com.
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and is housed i an
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Interviews will be held Oct. 30

All benefits normally found in
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Financial and techn~ical position
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potential.

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DATA-DESIGN LABORATORIES
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Introducing new Estron-lined

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for

unlimited
opportunity

Me w r;

Representatives of the team that put America's first
Space Probe beyond the Moon will be here for interviews

The interest of Olin Mathieson in the vital fields of chemicals, metals,. packaging,
pharmaceuticals and energy and in the sporting arms and ammunition industry
promises the chemist, the chemical and the mechanical and metallurgical engineers
a career that can progress along any one of many avenues just as rapidly as ability
can be displayed. We would like to talk to you about your post-graduate plans.
Include Olin Mathieson in your interview itinerary.

ON

NOVEMBER 2
at
128 West Engineering Building

I

interested in talking with.
PHYSICISTS - CHEMISTS - MATHEMATICIANS ELECTRONIC,
AERONAUTICAL, MECHANICAL AND STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS
JOB OPENZINGS NOI~flN THEg~ SE F ,

I

I

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