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May 24, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Japanese Students

EXCHANGE ACCUSATIONS OVER SUMMIT:

ith

Tokyo

Police Force

..

1

[url Bricks
t Officers
1 Outburst

RELEASED AFTER QUESTIONING
Detain American Coed in Hungary
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Harvey Mol-
etch is studying this semester in "But don't worry, you will like no sleep for 40 hours, she was I
Vienna. Last semester he was a life in Hungary . . p e r h a p s back to the original guard pC
embyr of fhDaEy.)rmonths, maybe years, probably and this time safely crossed t
By HARVEY MOLOTCo ayour) whole life. But you will meet world's most heavily guarde
Special to The Daily a nice Hungarian and get married border into neutral Austria.

Protest Kishi.Regime,
U.S.-Japanese Pact
TOKYO ()-Nearly 1,000 left-
wing university students battled
steel-helmeted police yesterday in
another violent' demonstration
against Prime Minister Nobusuke
Kishi's government and the
United States - Japanese security
paet.
The students, growing more ag-
gressive in their outbursts, hurled
bricks and stones into the ranks
of an estimated 3,000 officers.out-!
side Kishi's barricaded official
residence.
Club-wielding officers broke up
the crowd 40 minutes later. Au-
thorities said 88 police were in-
jured, 14 seriously, and about 40
students were hurt.
Join Groups
Many of the students later
joined various leftwing groups
in snakedance demonstrations
through the streets, of Tokyo.
Chanting anti-government slogans
and singing the Communist In-
ternationale, the youths were de-
manding dissolution of parliament
and ,the immediate resignation of
Kishi and his pro-West cabinet.
But Kishi reiterated his deter-
mination to remain in office and
keep parliament in session until
the security pact becomes law.
The treaty- was rammed through
the lower house in a stormy mid-
night session last Friday. It now
awaits ratification by the upper
house. If the chamber does not
act, it goes into effect 30 days
after lower house ratification
(June 19).
Not In Residence

VIENNA-"How much will your
parents be willing to pay for your
release," a uniformed Hungarian
boarder official asked threaten-
ingly.
The response was a silent look
of disbelief as Miss Patricia Crot-
ty, an American student studying
in Vienna, began a four hour
grilling behind the Iron Curtain.
For Patty Crotty, an innocent
weekend sojourn to Budapest with
some friends had turned into
something of a nightmare.
First Tour
On May 14, just one week after
travel to Hungary had been open-
ed to Americans for the first time
since the 1956 revolution, the St.
Marys of Notre Dame junior de-
parted on her first tour of a Com-
munist country.
Things went relatively smooth-
ly at the border and continued in
a normal fashion during her two
day stay in the Hungarian capi-
tal.
"It was fascinating to exchange
views with the Communists,"
noted Miss Crotty. "But they
speak with such sincerity, .such
earnestness. It can only be de-
scribed as pathetic."
Passport Kept
But the fascination turned to
suspicion when Miss Crotty was
not returned her passport by the
hotel clerk as is the European
custom. (Throughout Europe, a
foreign guest must relinquish his
passport upon registering at a
hotel.)
"I asked the hotelman for my
passport and all he could say was
that it had never come back from
the political police," the student
added.
"Of course I was worried so I
checked with our tour guide (gov-
ernment employed) who told me
to be at ease because he was sure
that his colleague would have it
at the border."
No Passport
But at about midnight when
the bus got to the border there
was no colleague and no passport.
After a great deal of confusion
the bus crossed into Austria and
Patricia Crotty was being held in
Communist Hungary against her
will.
"From that moment on I was
always surrounded by armed
guards," the student told The
Daily. "They sent up flares and
soon a new procession of soldiers
came to the guard post and start-
ed questioning me.
"Then they put me into the back
of a truck with several guards and
I was taken to a military police
station."
Refuse Call
Miss Crotty requested that she
be able to call the American em-
bassy and was refused permission.
"When they started questioning
me, I thought they were kidding,"
the co-ed continued. "But I was
soon sure that they weren't."
"What did you do with your-
passport?" an officer cajoled.
"What are you trying to do?" he
queried in his broken English.
"You gave your passport to
someone . . . Who? . . . You want
to get a beautiful blonde across
the border in the fall, don't you,"
the "interviewer" continued.

I

Kishi was not in his official
residence during the demonstra-
tion, the second in four days by
the Zengakuren National Student
Federation in its campaign
against the government.
The Prime Minister at the time
was in conference with officials
of -his IAberal - Democratic party
over the. storm created by the 10-
year treaty, which commits the
United States to defend Japan
and provides for United States
bases here.
The opposition Socialists said
they planned to call' at the United
States embassy today and offic-
ially demand that P r e s i d e n t
Dwight D. Eisenhower call off his
scheduled visit to Japan next.
month.
Most Japanese newspapers,
while not necessarily opposed to
the pact, feel its ratification
should not have been hurried.
Israeli Forces
Captujre Nazi
War Criminal
JERUSALEM, Israeli Sector (W)
-Adolf Eichmann, the most
wanted Nazi war criminal still at
large, has been captured and will
stand trial in Israel, Premier
David Ben-Gurion announced yes-
terday.
Ben-Gurion charged in the
Knesset (Parliament) that Eich-
mann and other Nazi leaders were
responsible for "the Extermina-
tion of six million Jews of Eu-
rope:"
The premier told the startled
Knesset-which had no previous
inkling the long manhunt was
over-that Eichmann-now 54-
had recently been seized by Israel
security forces.
"Adolf Eichmann is already un-
der arrest in Israel," Ben-Gurion
said, "and will shortly be placed
on trial in Israel under terms of
Israel's law for the trial of Nazis
and their collaborators."
The premier gave no details of
the arrest of the man who was a
top aide of Heinrich Himmler,
boss-df the dread Nazi secret po-
lice or Gestapo.

0 1 K

If'

Ike Prepares
Radio-TVTalk
WASHINGTON (M) - President
Dwight D. Eisenhower yesterday
set tomorrow night as the time for
his report to the people on the
collapse of the summit conference.
In apparent preparation for a
major effort, he called an unusual
meeting of the National Security
Council, his top level strategy
board, for today at 9 a.m. EDT.
Eisenhower is expected to give
his reasons for the failure of the.
big power meeting at Paris.

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