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May 24, 1960 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-24

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wo TIHE MICHIGAN DAILY

TU"S"AY, MAY 24,

rse Shortage Causes Training Changes

I

4cPA64 Cima~n

I

EDUCATION ABROAD:
Ten To Study in England Under 'U' Plan
By MICHAEL OLIMCK I ^~" ~~i ' ~~~ I

v

By JUDITH SATTLER
Because the need for registered
rses in the United States is
tical, nurses training is under-
ing a number of changes.
En 1957, there was a shortage
70,000 registered nurses in the
tion, and of 5,000 in Michigan,
cording to a study done at that
ne. The shortage has steadily
creased since then.
Hospitals are becoming increas-
;ly understaffed because of in-
ased use of health insurance
d other health services, which
ye created new fields for nurs-
g, and expansion of hospital
:ilities and increasing use of
mplicated equipment.
Salaries Discouraging,
Low salaries and irregular hours
ad to discourage women from
tering the field. So, although
ore 'women begin nursing every
ar the demand continues to
ow faster than the supply.
This demand for more nursing
rsonnel is being met by changes
the type of training offered.
Two year nursing programs, as
quick way to train women to fill
irsing posts, have been endorsed
r Prof. W. T. Sanger, chancellor
the Virginia Medical College,
ao did a study on nursing in
ichigan. These programs, usually
ugnt at junior colleges, are im-
oved by cooperation between

hospital schools and the college,
Prof. Sanger said.

Definite Need
There is a definite need for per-
sons trained in technical skills
who could do more routine work,
according to Prof. Norma Mar-
shall, of the University nursing
school. In the future, two years of
training may become more com-
mon, she said.
Prof. Sanger reports an unusual
type of nursing training whichis
used at the Mercy Central School
of Nursing, in which a 27-month
course is followed by a nine-month
voluntary internship. The intern-
ship provides "educationally ori-
enter work experience" and gives
good preparation for both basic
nursing and superintendent work,
he said.
Hospital Schools
Hospital schools usually give a
three-year course leading to a
nursing diploma; this type of
training is most common, accord-
ing to Prof. Marshall. While pro-
viding more intensive practical
training, the program does not
give the trainee any liberal arts
education.
Some nursing educators think
this type of training could. be
given more quickly, and there was
discussion about shortening it at
the recent American Nursing As-
sociation convention.

The four-year program, offered
at universities and colleges, gives
the students both a nursing di-
ploma and a baccalaureate degree.
Sanger Suggests
In his report, Prof. Sanger sug-
gested that women with four
years of training be given more
administrative or teaching posts,
and be relieved of non-nursing
tasks. Others think that the four-
year program is basic nursing
training only, and that teaching
or administration requires post-
graduate study.
Prof. Sanger recommended more
graduate programs in nursing, to
prepare women more adequately
for teaching, administration, pub-
lic health nursing and research.
Such a graduate program is now
being developed at the University,
while Wayne State University al-
ready has one.
To do those jobs which do not
require technical training, more
and more practical nurses and
nurses' aides are being usedin
hospitals, because of the short-
age of registered nurses, accord-
ing to Prof. Marshall. Aides can
be trained on the job, and practi-
cal nurses can be trained in six
months.
No. Standard Program
There is no standardized pro-
gram of study in nursing, Prof.
Marshall said, although the Amer-
ican Nursing Association does set
up minimum requirements through
the Michigan Board of Nursing.
This board also must approve
nursing training programs and
set the passing level on board
exams for Michigan nurses.
Prof. Sanger has suggested that
the board be given more control
over training programs to increase
uniformity.

"Horizons of Science," a 10-part
film series from the Princeton
University Testing Service, will be
shown from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow in
the Multipurpose Room of the
Undergraduate Library, Daniel S.
Lirones of the audio-visual de-
partment announced yesterday.
Faculty and students are in-
vited to attend the series which
will run continuously throughout
the day.
The program includes "Visual
Perception," "The World of Dr.
Vishriiac," "Exploring the Edge of
Space," "Thinking Machines,"
"The Mathematician and the
River," "New Lives for Old," Pro-
ject Mohole, Report No. 1,"
"Realm of the Galaxies," "Flow of
Life," and "Neutrons and Parts
of Matter."
Musket Scripts . .
The deadline date for original
scripts, submitted for Musket's
consideration, has been extended
through Sept. 15, John Fried,
general chairman, announced yes-
terday.
"The summer interim should
allow those who feel they can
compile a script ample time to
work it out," he said.
Fried sad the script should be
a musical comedy of normal per-
formance length. Complete or-
chestration will be required.
He added that in view of the
extended deadline scripts in need
of revision or rewriting cannot be
accepted by the committee. The
chosen script will be produced in
April, 1961, if a show is found to
be feasible at that time.
Space Colloquium * ..
"Monochromater Measurement
of the Solar Far Ultraviolet and
X-Ray Spectrum," will be the
subject of a space astrophysics
colloquium, conducted by Prof.!
H. E. Hinterigger, director of
Geophysics Research at the Air
Firce Cambridge Research Cen-
ter, Bedford, Mass. The colloqu-
ium will be held under the aus-
pices of the Institute of Science
and Technology at 4:15 p.m. today
in Aud. B.
Science Seminar .. .
"Phased Beam and Quasi-Opti-
cal Antennas," wild be the topic
of a seminar conducted by Prof.
Samuel Silver of the electrical
engineering department at the
University of California, Berkeley,
at 3:30 p.m. tomorrow in Aud. B
under the auspices of the Institute
of Science and Technology.

Ten literary college and educa-
tion school students will spend the
coming fall semester studying and
practice teaching in Sheffield,
England as part of the University's
education abroad program.
The semester abroad, sponsored
by the School of Education, aims
to enable students to engage in
full-time study of professional
education in another country.
Under this plan it is possible to
become acquainted with school
aims and practices in England, as
well as earn credit for work re-
quired for the Michigan secondary
provisional teaching certificate.
The program is basically the
idea of Prof. Claude A. Eggertsen,
of the education school, who is
directing the project. Prof. Eggert-
sen first visited Sheffield in 1950
on a sabbatical leave. He has re-
turned twice, once with a group
of 30 students in the summer of
'1958. Out of these visits grew an
association that has led to an ex-
change of teachers between the
School of Education and the Uni-
versity of Sheffield. This will be
the first time, however, that a
group of University students will
study there.
Students Apply
Juniors and seniors from all
schools and colleges in the Univer-
sity may apply for the semester at
Sheffield, provided they anticipate
earning a teacher's -certificate.
In a later semester here the stu-
dents will have to earn six addi-
tional credit hours to receive the
certificate. These will come from
courses in student teaching and
problems and practices of sec-
ondary education.
Prof. Eggertsen stressed the
need and desirability to apply
early for the program. "Since the
student can earn up to 16 hours of
credit in education courses at

I F
I

I

I"

PROF. CLAUDE EGGERTSEN
... directs project
Sheffield, he ought to plan his pro-
gram long before he goes so he
won't duplicate courses here," he
said. Prof. Eggertsen is already ac-
cepting applications for next year.
Discuss Trip
At a meeting in Prof. Eggert-
sen's home Sunday, the students
and members of the faculty that
have been to Sheffield met to dis-
cuss their coming trip.
Tuition at Sheffield, Prof. Eg-
gertsen explained, is $100 for the
semester and room and boardsruns
$200 to $300. The students will
stay at residence halls or in ap-
proved lodgings for the five month
period from September 15 to Janu-
ary 30.
Sheffield is one of about 20 Eng-
lish universities, Prof. Eggertsen
said. "It is a typically good one,"
he commented, "and far better in
the education department than
Cambridge or London.
The University of Sheffield en-i

rolls about 3,000 students, 150 of
whom are in the department of
education, Miss Geraldine Scholl,
who was an exchange teacher
there last year, said.
"The city itself is a steel' and
coal mining center of about half
a million population. There is
magnificent countryside in the
area, esperially since York, Sher-
wood Forest, Peak and Chester-
field are near;"
Dean Willard Olsen, of the
Slhool of Education, described the
Sheffield people as "most hospit-
able." He remarked that he and
his wife were "royally entertained"
when they visited there several
years ago.
The students' schedule at Shef-
field will ,include nine weeks of
lectures six days a week, seven
weeks of practice teaching, a week
of intensive study at Ashford, Kent
and a month long Christmas vaca-
tion. The practice teaching will
be divided into 3 periods a day
teaching and five periods of ob-
servation.
Spend Winter
Prof. W. Scott Westerman, who
just returned from Sheffield, said
that the students spend their un-
usually long winter vacation study-
ing. "There is not much time for
study during the regular session
because of the tight lecture sched-
ule," he explained. "The students
also feel that. active participation
in the community is an essential
part of university life and this
also adds to their neglect of home-
work."
Miss Scholl described the social
life of the girls. "You're on your
own a great deal more there," she
said, mentioning that there is no
curfew and that the boys are al-
lowed in girls' rooms until 10 each
night. "However," she warned,
"life is quite a bit more formal
there for England is a tradition-
bound country."

In other action the Regents ac
cepted $1,000 from the Whitin
Foundation for the 50th anniver
sary fund of the department o
political science.
From Michigan Bell Telephor
Company the Regents' accepte
$1,000 as a contribution towards
computer for the industrial en
gineering department.
The Regents also accepted the
offer of National Educationa
Television and Radio Center, an(
the Japan Society to underwri1
the production of television pro
grams e n t i t l e d "Contemporai
Japan."
DIAL NO 5-6290
THREE

Re-Appoint
Coe to Post
As, Lecturer
The Regents Friday reappointed
Prof. Carl J. Coe lecturer in math-
ematics at Flint College for the
first semester of next year.
Prof. Coe is an assistant pro-
fessor-emeritus of the University.
Claire J. Shellabarger, assistant
to the chairman of the medical
department of the Brookhaven
National Laboratories, was ap-
pointed a professor in the Univer-
sity zoology department and co-
ordinator of the Kresge Radio-
isotope in the Medical School.
Frederick G. Vogt of Grand
Rapids was reappointed alumni
member of the Board in Control
of Intercollegiate Athletics. His
term ends May 31, 1963.

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER

presents
AVANT-GARDE FILMS
from the
CINEMA 16 FILM SOCIETY
A unique program, including award winners
at Brussels and Edinburgh
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, May 26 to 28
8 P.M. Ann.Arbor Public Library

I

DAC MEMBERS 50c

NON-MEMBERS $1
Aincludes inembershipQ

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The U~niver-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Adminsitration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. two days preced-
ing publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
TUESDAY, MAY 24, 1960
VOL. LXX, No. 175
General Notices
June Regents' Meeting: The June
(Continued on Page 4)

SOrganization
Notices
MAY 24, 1961
Early Registration Pass Comm., SGC,
Requisitions for Early Registration
Passes for Fall, 1960, are available in
2011- SAB.
* * *
ICC, Announcement of Openings for
Summer, Housing Applications for
Summer Session are now being ac-
cepted. Apply Rm. 2546, SAB or phone
NO 8-6872, 9-12 or 2-5.
* w s
Intern'tl Folk Dancers, Dancing &
Instruction, May 25, 8 p.m., Lane Hall.
Life Guard Corps, Meeting, May 24,
7:15 p.m., Women's Pool.

DIAL
NO 8-64
"I com
Your a
... biti

16
tmend it to "A stinging sati
attention direct tine of Ge
ingly satiric" ,savage cartoons,
.-John McCarten, Bert Brecht and
The New Yorker ; ;?';'Threepenny Ope
RY

ACADEMY AWARD
WINNERS.,.
THE PULITZER
PRIZE AUTHOR
... AND NOW
THE SCREEN IS

I

re in the
orge Grosz's
and
Kurt Weill's
era'."-Titue

',

I

LONDON RECORDS
presents the
Richmond-Telefunken Series

STRUCK BY
LIGNTHINGI

Friday: "GRAPES OF WRATH and "TOBACCO ROAD"

at

Do16u Thknkfor Iourse/ff
(BUZZ THIS QUIZ AND SEE WHERE YOU LANDI*)

NOW

1

DIAL
NO 2-6264

$ 98

Beethoven Third Symphony "Eroica"--ErichKleiber
Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)
Beethoven Seventh Symphony -
Concertgebouw Orchestra
Capriccio Espagnol (Rimsky-Korsakov) Ansermet
Tristan and Isolde Prelude and Liebestod
London Philharmonic
Mendelssohn: Viollin Concerto-London Philharmonic
Carmen and L'Arlesienne Suites (Bizet)
Four Seasons (Vivaldi) -Munchinger
New World Symphony (Dvorak)
Brahms Violin Concerto-Ricci
Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture
Beethoven Fifth Symphony-Vienna Philharmonic
Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2-Julius Katchen
Swan Lake Suite and Peer Gynt Suite No. 1
Brahms Hungarian Dances
Beethoven Violin Concerto-Adrian Boult
Beethoven Symphony No. 6-Erich Kleiber
Finlandia (Sibelius)
Brahms Symphony No. 2-Furtwangler
Peer Gynt Suites No. 1 and No. 2
The Rite of Spring (Stravinsky) -Ansermet
Brahms Third Symphony-Keilberth
Frank Symphony in D Minor-Munch
Brahms Symphony No. 1
Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1
1812 Overture (Tchaikovsky) -Adrian Boult
Nutcracker Suite (Tchaikovsky)
Capriccio Italien (Tchaikovsky)

'V
.'ill .

ERNIE MARGO JACK NOBU DCK
KOVACS -MOORE 'WARDEN - McCARTKYM. SHAWN-" mCRD OREt
* COMING *
JAMES CAGNEY
in "THE GALLANT HOURS"

/

..
..,.

I

.4

t"

"A little learning is a dangerous thing" means
(A) it's better to leave your mind alone; (B)
people who act on half-knowledge often make
mistakes; (C) beware of sophomores.

AM B] CE

HOW
OFTEN
DOES
ELlA
KAZA N
MAKE
A
MOTION
PICTURE

MATADOR
Af

"Never look a gift horse in
the mouth" is good advice
because (A) he'll bite; (B)
even if his teeth show he's
old, what can you do about
it? (C) there's nothing in
there anyway.
AE BM CE
Assuming the starting sal-
ary is the same, would you
rather have (A) a job with
an assured income for life,
but with no chance to in-
crease it? (B) a job where
you'll always be paid ac-
cording to your abilities?
(C) a job where you have
to advance rapidly or be
fired?
AE] BE] CE]
. The finer the filter
strands, the finer the filter
action" is a way of saying
(A) don't use chicken wire
in a window screen; (B)
Viceroy gives you finest
filter action because it has
the finest filter strands;
(C) the finer the filters,

will have found out that Viceroy gives
you the best filtering of any cigarette, for
a taste you can really enjoy. A thinking
man's filter. A smoking man's taste.
That's Viceroy!
*If you checked (C) on three out of four of
these questions, you're fairly astute. But if
you checked (B)-you think for yourself!
CO
.. l R'

Perhaps once a year at the most!
Sometimes he searches two years
* . . three years . . . for just the
right story . . . locale . . . stars
the combination that spells a
major entertainment.
Then cameras begin to record
the emotions that have brought
Kazan Academy Awards for"On
The Waterfront" and "Gentleman's
Agreement,'... and such
rich critical acclaim for
"Pinky" and "AStreetcar
Named Desire."
Now he brings to the screen WILD RIVER,
starring Montgomery Clift, Lee Remick and
Jo Van Fleet.

1

I

'I

Peter and the Wolf (Prokofiev)
The Pines and Fountains of Rome (Respighi)
Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 6-Munch
Coppelia-Sylvia Ballet Suites-(Delibes)

Actually filmed in the
heart of the Tennessee
valley, it is a smoldering
drama of the building of the
new South ...
of men and women whose bodies
became a bulwark against the
intrusion of a new way
of life.
MMAMFIOV (1'14

.5, 4± t

p'

Petrushka (Stravinsky)-Ansermet

I

i

.1

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