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May 20, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-20

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e Arrives

in Portugral;

sks

New

Peace

Efforts

ESTERN SPECULATION:

(hrushchev May Face Kremlin Crisis

d
r
I

PARIS (IP)-Western statesmen
quite the scene of the fantastic'
summit parley yesterday, virtually
convinced that a crisis in the
Kremlin forced Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev to blow up the talks.
First assessment of their experts
suggested further that the Soviet
Premier's performance in Paris
was dictated by a fight for politi-
cal survival.
The governments led by Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower and
Charles de Gaulle and Prime Min-
ister Harold Macmillan also seem-
ed to share the view that Soviet
leaders have not yet decided ir-
revocably whether to bury or keep
alive the policy of relaxing East-
West tensions.
Leaders To Wait
As a result, the Western leaders
have agreed on a policy of wait
and see.
According to information from
the highest authorities, this prob-
ably will mean that for their part
the Allies will do nothing to make
an East-West accomodation im-
possible.
At the same time they intend tor
insure that their guard is raised,
their defenses are ready and their
plans up-dated to meet any emer-
gency that might arise in Berlin
or elsewhere.'
NATO Supports West
A quick show of Western solid-
arity came from the permanent
council of the - North Atlantic
Treaty Organization. After hear-
ing the three Western foreign
ministers report on the summit

debacle, the 15-nation council in
special session unanimously sup-
ported the-Western position.
A NATO spokesman said the
delegates "paid. tribute to the
spirit of concilation of the three
Western chiefs of government
and the calm and dignity they
showed." They expressed regret
that Khrushchev's position "made
the negotiations in Paris impos-
sible."
The council also approved the
foreign ministers' readiness to
continue to seek a solution of
world problems by "peaceful means
House Slates
School Bill
WASHINGTON (P)-A $975 mil-
lion school construction bill was
cleared by the House Rules Com-
mittee yesterday and for House
action next week.
A 7-5 vote in the committee sent
the measure on its way .to what
promises to be a mixed reception
in the House.
No general school aid bill has
passed the House this century.
Two previous attempts-in 1956
and 1957-failed by narrow mar-
gins. Before the Rules Committee
met, there had been talk the group
might dust off and send to the
House a $4.5 billion authorization
it has had pigeon-holed for a year.1

U 1

through negotiation," the spokes-
man added.
Discusses Atlantic Defenses
With the cold war winds blow-
ing at full blast again, the coun-
cil also took up the question of
tightening the Atlantic defenses,
the spokesman said, adding:
"You can take it our defenses
are being looked after."
In assaying the quick change in
Khrushchev's tactics, W e s t e r n
authorities noted that in the week
beginning May 8 two distinct de-
velopments took place.
In Washington on May 9 and 11
Secretary of State Christian A.
Herter, then the President him-
self, admitted knowledge and re-
sponsibility for the U-2 flight
over the Soviet Union and indi-
cated they were not being halted.
An American source said Herter
told the NATO council yesterday
the U-2 flights had been going on
for four years and produced in-
formation of value to the West.
In Moscow about the same time
Communist Party and Red army
bosses met in extraordinary ses-
sion for three or four days before
Khrushchev's departure for Paris.
This was evidently the setting for
the internal crisis that produced
a return to the toughness of the
cold war.
It is known, for example, that
Khrushchev wrote Macmillan a
letter May 8, a week after the U-2
was downed. The letter made no
mention of the plane, merely
raised some questions about the
agenda, and gave no hint of an
intent to sabotage the summit
meeting.
Management,
Labor Confer
On Problems
WASHINGTON M)-A top level
labor-management conference,
convening at the request of Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower, got
off to a promising start yesterday.
Four representatives of manage-
ment and three from organized
labor held a. three-hour explora-
tory session which they later joint-
ly described as a "completely ami-
cable and reasonable discussion."
It was indicated, however, that
the conferees steered clear of
coming to grips in any detail with
any of their mutual problems, dis-
cussing them only in the broadest
of terms.
Moreover, the labor union chiefs
requested that the industry people
recruit top men from the auto,
steel, railroad, construction and
other major industries to join in
future conferences.
The next meeting was left to be
arranged in some six or eight
weeks because some of the con-
ferees have other commitments.
AFL-CIO President George Meany
for one, is due to leave for Europe
soon.

Comments 1
On Collapse
OfSummit
President Sees Need
For Greater Unity
Of Western Powers{
LISBON (M-)-President Dwight;
D. Eisenhower flew in yesterday
from the cold of a dead summit
conference to a warm welcome
from 250,000 Portuguese shouting
"Viva Eisenhower" and "We like
Ike."
The wave of affection rolling
over the President brought out the
famous Eisenhower smile as he
rode in an open car through this
capital's streets in a downpour of
brightly colored confetti.
Once in his quarters in Queluz
Palace, however, his mood sobered
as he called for the Western pow-
ers to work even harder for peace,
despite the failure of the Paris
summit meeting.
Asks No Dismay
"Rather than being dismayed,"
he told assembled United States
employees, "we must tighten our
belts, keep our chins up and each
of us work a little harder for the
great cause of peace with justice
and freedom."
Eisenhower discussed briefly the
breakup of the summit meeting
over Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev's demand that he
publicly apologize for the U-2 spy
flight over the Soviet Union.
"While none of the free world
thought that there would be any
revolutionary gains at the summit
conference," he said, "they did
feel that there was a good chance
of some amelioration of some of
the tensions in the world.
Reports Peace Efforts
"You deserve to know that the
representatives of the United
States, the United Kingdom and
France did our very best to bring
about that condition. We ans-
wered abuse with dignity and
logic. We answered accusations
with facts."
The President referred to Port-
ugal, a partner with the United
States in the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization, as a tremen-
dous friend and ally and said:
"Whenever these situations
occur, we have to work ever
stronger to strengthen our own
camp and bring it ever closer to-
gether."

Spaceship
Alters Path,
Cabin Firedj
WASHINGTON (M - Russia's
new spaceship has apparently been
kicked into a 100-mile higher orbit
around the earth.
Scientists speculated this meant
the ship had ejected the cabin
containing a dummy astronaut.
American and British scientists,
who have been tracking the ship
since it was launched last Sunday
morning, reported yesterday its;
time for circling the earth had
suddenly changed from a little
more than 91 minutes to about 94
minutes.
This would mean, according to
a calculation of one American sci-
entist, that the spacecraft had
changed from an orbital height of
about 200 miles above the earth
to nearly 300.
Lifted After Ejection
The most likely explanation,
American experts said, is that the
ship-originally weighing 4.5 tons
-was lifted higher after ejecting
the 2.5 ton pressurized cabin it re-
portedly carried.
They said the sudden lightening
of weight twould not of itself
cause a change to a higher orbit.
Rather, they speculated that the
change was due to the rocket con-
ceivably used to eject the capsule.
One view was that a rocket on
the capsule ejected it backward
from the spaceship-and that the
recoil speeded up the spaceship,
causing it to go into a higher
orbit.
Think Rocket Pushed Ship
A second view was that an ejec-
tion rocket attached to the space-
ship shoved the ship ahead and
into a higher orbit.
These scientists, who declined
to be named, conceded in reply to
a reporter's question that there is
further long-shot possibility:
That the Russian spaceship may
have been equipped with some
auxiliary source of propulsion-.-
possibly atomic~- powered - which
was designed to take the ship
higher after it was first placed in
its original orbit by the launch-
ing rocket.
The American Civilian Space
Agency disclosed more than a
month ago it is working on an
atomic - powered propulsion sys-
tem which might someday drive
a satellite or space probe deeper
into a lower orbit by a rocket.

DISUNITY IN SENATE:
Debate Nixon's Political Ai

'.7

WASHINGTON MA'-The unityv
front showed cracks yesterday as
Senate Democrats and Republi-
cans thrust and counterthrustj
over whether Vice-President Rich-
ard M. Nixon sought political ad-
vantage from the summit debacle.
At storm center was Nixon's
statement in Buffalo, N.Y., Wed-
nesday that if the Democrats "be-7
lieve we should have allowed a gap
in our intelligence, let them in-
vestigate it. If they believe the
President should have apologized'
to Khrushchev (for the spy plane
flight), let them investigate."
Sen. Mike Mansfield (p-Mont),
denying for the Democrats on both
counts, retorted: "It appears to
me Nixon is creating straw men
for the purpose of knocking them
down.
Mansfield's remarks came on
End Flights
Into Norway
WASHINGTON P)-The State
Department broadly indicated yes-
terday that the United States has
promised not to use Norway as a
base for future spy flights over
Russia.
Press Officer Lincoln White de-
clined, however, to specify exactly
what assurances, had been given
to the NATO ally.
The Soviet Union claims that
the V-2 spy plane flight downed
in Russia May 1 was destined from
Pakistan to Norway. Norwegian
Foreign Minister Halvard M.
Lange subsequently said it had
been established that the U-2 was
headed for Norway's Bodo airfield.
He protested to United States Am-
bassador Frances E. Willis and
demanded that the United States
avoid similar planned landings in
the future.
White said yesterday:
"The United States has deliv-
ered a reply to the Norwegian gov-
ernment's oral protest 'and has
given assurances in response to
the request of the Norwegian gov-
ernment."
Told that Ambassador Willis
had said Oslo was assured against
future United States spy flights
involving Norway, the State De-
partment spokesman said the am-
bassador's word is good enough
for him.

top of a protest by Sen. Albert
Gore (D-Tenn) that "while Dem-
ocrats in the Senate are pleading
for unity, Nixon is undertaking to
conver the tragedy in Paris to his
political expediency . .
Sen. Bourke B. Hickenlooper
(R-Iowa) rebuked Gore for mak-
ing an "unwarranted and unjusti-
fied" attack and for being "un-
duly brutal and harsh" with the
Vice-President, who is an all-but-
certain Republican candidate for
the presidency.
Amid this wrangling, there were
others related happenings on Cap-
itol Hill:
Related Developments Listed
Sen Thomas J. Dodd (D-Conn)
called for prosecution of Cleveland
industrialist Cyrus Eaton under
the 160-year-old Logan Act. This
law, which never has been used,
forbids private citizens from ne-
gotiating with foreign powers with
intent to influence United States
policy.
Dodd made his speech--and was
applauded for it by Republican
senators--after Eaton, a longtime
advocate of Soviet-American
friendship, had conferred briefly
with Soviet Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev at the Paris airport.
Senate Democratic leader Lyn-
don B. Johnson of Texas said that

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I'

in taking the spy plane incident
to the United Nations there is "a
serious question as to whether the
Soviets are looking for a method
of settling disputes or a sounding
board for further propaganda."
He said the action "has the trap-
pings of a propaganda circus."
Nab 100 Red Spies
Rep. Cornelius E. Gallagher
(D-NJ), in a speech prepared for
the House, said nearly 100 Russian
spies-including eight in the So-
viet Embassy here - have been
caught in noncommunist countries
since World War II. This, Galla-
gher said, "makes the U-2 inci-
dent look like child's play."
Nixon said in Buffalo Wednes-
day that a Russian employee of
the United Nation Secretariat was
caught spying in Springfield,
Mass., at the time of Khrushchev's.
visit to this country last fall.
Yesterday, officials said the
case Nixon mentioned involved an
effort by the Russian to crack
United States code secrets.
The Vice-President threw his
investigation challenge at the
Democrats in saying the Soviet
spy case was handled without an
international fuss, contrasted with
Russian conduct in the United
States spy plane incident.

C

tarting
TODAY
1 commend it to "A stinging sati
your attention direct line of Ge
..bitingly satiric" savage cartoons,
-john McCart e Bert Brecht and
The New York'ThreepennyOp

DIAL
NO 8-6416
re in the
orge Grosz's
and
Kurt Weill's
froa .-Tiffs

94C rpy Bat
Second Front Page

Coming: "TOBACCO ROAD" and "GRAPES OF WRATH"

I

Friday, May 20, 1960

Page 3

RAMSAY PRINTERS
119 East Liberty

Si

5
N

ENDING ADIAL
ATURDAY NO 2-62F
ALL THE GREAT
JAMES STEwART GLENNMIC E
JUNE' ALLYSON
GLENN
IMILLERSTOY ;.
ui CHARLES DRAKE GEORGE TOBIAS-HENRY MORGAN
fd * O .w . MvolG-0,.'-s Gw.t Sn
fRAiCmS WgMfORIJ*WWARSTRU*UNE IINPA-KM Fett cx 6 -

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LAST
C, TWO
DAYS

" a.
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1%.

ow

SUNDAY: "WAKE ME WHEN IT'S OVER"

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Elm

happy 4o1ica A
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