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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 20, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRDAY,MAY
Carflonneur4 4 LITERARY WORKSHOP:
T~ ~.im....................,:.: iM~uehl Discusses Role of ModernWi

BUDGET-MAKER-Ron Peters guarded the money, watched
expenditures, and supervised the advertising for The Daily this
year.
Ron Pdeters Recalls Year
As Business, Manager
By MORLEY GWIRTZMAN
Associate Business Manager tasks may seem, you always see
Reflecting" back on his past year your results in the following
Reflctig bck n hs pst earmorning's edition.
as Daily Business Manager, Ron- According to Ron there are
ald Peters remembers most of his three sides to every person-"the
"many associations with people," academic, the social, and the busi-
both students and merchants. ness." He feels "The Daily busi-
The Diually thebusinesson stan at thjoined ness staff has gone a long way in
beginning of his sophomore year developing an individual's social
was "to meet more people and to An invs working
get a better understanding of An individual working on The
them." Ron felt that since he Daily learns in a very short time
was in engineering school, he the meaning of the word respon-
should find time to put away his sibility.
slide rule and books. Misses Atmosphere
As it turned out, his slide rule Now that the new staffs have
proved handy at The Daily this taken over, Ron misses more than
year, especially when it was neces- anything else the atmosphere of
sary to figure out the monthly 420 Maynard St. "The carefree
budget reports. environment of The Daily takes
Asks More you away from everything. Al-
Ron says college should offer an though the pressure is there, it
individual more than just intellec- is enjoyable. College years, es-
tual "development. In order to de- pecially the early ones, are quite
velop a more "well-rounded per- impressionable," Ron says, having
sonality," he thinks students found his three years on The
should definitely participate in Daily made a strong impact on his
campus activities. . attitudes and views toward his
"Activities offer a student a ultimate goals in life.
'second life,' the chance to meet, "These attitudes are a result of
associate wtih, and understand the people you associate and work
people." He notes that "being able with, and The Daily atmosphere
to get along .with people is be is composed of a wide variety of
coming increasingly important in backgrounds and presonalities
business relations." with conflicting views."
The Daily plays a very im- Evans Scholars
portant role on campus "as both An active Evans Scholar, Ron
a service to the students and as is very grateful to the sponsors
a worthwhile campus activity," of this┬░fraternity for making
Ron. says. "The University is a possible his education here. He
city within a city, and The Daily is also a member of Alpha Chi
in many cases is the student's only Sigma, ,a professional chemistry
connecting link with the outside fraternity, and of Triangle and
world." Michigamua.
Daily Unique Completing his fifth and final
As an activity, The Daily is year in chemical engineering next
unique in that it allowf the indi- year, Ron likes the idea of fol-
vitual to receive an immediate lowing a tightly controlled cur-
sense of accomplishment, from riculum which is specially de-
the very first day. The nature of signed to give the very basic
The Daily is such that no matter courses and allows for more con-
what you start out doing, no mat- centrated efforts in one partcular
ter how menial the beginning field of study.
His long-range goal is to be in
*the administrative end of the
Daily Classif leds chemical industry. He plans to go
on to receive his master's degree
Bring Results in business administration at the
University.

By JUDITH OPPENHEIM
"The modern writer must decide
clearly whether he wants to write
for money or simply to express his
ideas," Prof. John F. Muehl of
the English department said yes-
terday at a discussion workshop
on fiction included in the Univer-
sity Writers' Conference.-
Contemporary magazine as well-
as television is becoming "not an
educational medium or even an
entertainment medium, but an ad-
vertising medium," he said.
Since advertising constitutes the
major portion of a magazine's in-
come, it is only natural that much
of the writing must be done, "with
the advertiser. reading over the
writer's shoulder," Prof. Muehl
explained.
Critical Writing Hard
Just as in television, where
writers are not supposed to "get
people on the edge of their chairs
and thinking hard" because this
lowers their receptivity to com-
mercials, so in magazines it be-
comes increasingly difficult for
really critical writing, calculated
to arouse a strong intellectual re-
sponse, to pass the censorship of
the editor.
One result of the emphasis on
"writing to please the advertiser
rather than the reader" has led
to what Prof. Muehl termed the
"formula short story."
Many of the leading national
magazines repeatedly publish
stories with identical, marked
characteristics, leading to the ex-
pressions "New Yorker stories" or
"Saturday Evening Post stories."
Writer Must Decide
But this restriction upon writ-
ing is not entirely bad for the
writer, since it forces him to
decide whether he wants to be a
professional writer or one who
simply writes for his own enjoy-
ment.
For those who want to become
professional writers, Prof. Muehl
recommended studying the trends
in the writing market and analyz-
ing the needs in new fiction. It is
a rare coincidence, however, when
a work of fiction written mainly
for the writer's own expression is
also a financial success.
Prof. John Heath-Stubbs, visit-
ing professor in the English de-
cussed his poem, "Churchyard
of St. Mary Magdalene, Old Mil-
ton."
'Blackout' Often Occurs
Prof. Heath-Stubbs chose this
particular poem for dsicussion be-
cause "I was to some extent con-
scious of how it was put together."
After writing poetry, a "typeHof
blackout" often prevents the
writer from recalling afterwards
exactly how he constructed his
poem, he added.
For this reason, better poetry
is on the whole the easiest to write

since it requires less conscious ef-
fort on the part of the writer.
Prof. Heath-Stubb's poem de-
scribes the churchyard in a small
English village where his father
is buried.
Describes Objective World
It was written ten years ago
after Prof. Heath-Stubbs visited
the village and was due partly to
"a deliberate impulse to write a
poem describing something in the
objective world I intimately knew."
It begins with an objective de-
scription and from this descrip-
tion, moves to a development and
expansion of mythical symbols.
He explained some of the par-
ticular symbols he had used in
the poem and described his at-
tempt to expand upon them by
the use description.
Speaking on comparative litera-
ture, Prof. Glauco Cambon of the
English department said that the
current invasion of American lit-
erature in Europe is not simply
the consequence of the second
world war.
Look for Trends
Prof. Cambon remarked that
European writers, translators, and
men of letters tend to look for
specific trends and revelations in
American literature.
American poets Walt Whitman
and Edgar Allen Poe are highly
regarded by many Europeans.
Whitman in particular was a
prime inspiration to the German
expressionists, the Russian futur-.
ists, French existentialists and
many Italian writers.
Whitman often represents the
attitude of health, rejuvenation
and abundance of space and op-
portunity for which America is so
well known, Prof. Cambon com-
mented.

"I wouldn't want to live in a
world that excluded the dimension
of poetry," Prof. Cambon said,
and went on to explain that
American poetry is currently the
greatest literary object of foreign
interest.
American poetry is experimen-
tal and has a cosmopolitan quality
because so much of it is written
by the children and grandchildren
of immigrants who know the ways
of the old world as well as the
new.
Prof. Cambon has translated
the works of many American au-
thors into Italian, particularly the
stories of William Faulkner. His
favorite of the books he has trans-
lated is Faulkner's "Absalom Ab-
salom."
Prof. Robert F. Haugh of the
English department presided over
the workshop session.
Confiwnment.
Denouneed
(UPS)-Students from over 24
New England colleges marched on
Concord, Mass, at 11 a.m. Satur-
day in protest to the imprison-
ment of Willard Uphaus.
Uphaus is being jailed fdr with-
holding the names of suspected
subversives who once attended a
summer camp he sponsored.
Among the participating col-
leges were students from Dart-
mouth, Harvard, Smith, Mount
Holyoke; Amherst, Yale, Radcliffe,
Brandeis, Northeastern, Benning-
ton, and the Universities of Mas-
sachusetts, New Hampshire and
Vermont.

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