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May 06, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-06

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TAE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAX 6, 1960

TU I(_( --AIX RIAYMY ,1a

I

ARMAMENT:,
students Plan To Stage
)ernonstration at Capitol

I

11

Joan Comlano,
Assembly President

>llege and university studentsv
ughout the state are planning
emonstration for disarmament
veen noon and 1 p.m., next
lay, May 13, on the lawn of
state capitol in Lansing.
etters to 45 colleges and uni-
ities in the state brought re-
s from 2,000 students favoring
demonstration.
he students want to express

their concern over the problem of
world disarmament. They hope
that the demonstration will influ-
ence proceedings at the coming
Geneva Conference.
A smaller demonstration or-
ganized by Bill Honey, a student
at Bay City College, will coincide
with the activities of the larger
movement.

I

A land
here time
ands still!

D AL 6
DIAL NO 2-6264

Where creatures
from the begin-
ning of time
still roam.

THE INTERNATIONAL
SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATION Ai
V4I MIWDTHE AUSPICS OF
MAJSIM KING LEOPOLD 3M
COL Sun

(Continued from Page 1)
Many girls want to live ini
Markley because it is modern,1
but once there they tend to0
identify more with the house
than with Markley itself. (She
herself prefers the greater in-,
timacy of Martha Cook.)
Joan is less satisfied with As-1
sembly's contributions in the
area of education. Interquad-
rangle Council does a better,
job, she points out.
Her role as ex-officio member
of Student Government Coun-
cil was important as her other'
duties, in Joan's opinion.
Council Role
"It's easy to see everything
that's wrong (with the Coun-
cil) but difficult to say what
to do about it," she remarked.
One of the principal things
wrong is an overabundance of
bureaucracy and projects, and
there is a solution, albeit a
drastic one.
She would suggest abolishing
the entire administrative wing,
and let SGC itself do all the
work for a year.
After that year, they could
add staff where the need had
been clearly demonstrated.
Avoid Busy Work
"That would avoid busy-work
Jobs," she declared.
There is a change in proce-
dure which would also make the
Council more effective, she said.
It should pick two or three big
areas to work in, and follow
through until done or until the
year runs out.
Areas where intensive pro-
grams of this sort would be
helpful include restrictive prac-
tices, orientation and housing,
she illustrated.
Beyond procedural-structural
changes. Joan sees need for a
change in attitude at SGC.
Individuals have to get a feel-
ing of group unity that "does
not now exist," she says.
'Too Many Fights'
"There are too many almost
fist fights.
"I really do think SGC could
accomplish something if reor-
ganized and reoriented.. .
"I had a lovely little theory
on student government and its
relation to the administration,
but it's unclear to me now.. .

"Some students think student
government should be an entity
unto itself, but the administra-
tion and the faculty often have
an overall view of things that
we don't have... .
"For example, there are times
when a student government
wants to recommend some-
thing without supplying needed
information to the person who
is in a position to make the
decision."
No Motion-Maker
of her own performance at
SGC, Joan says, "I haven't been
a motion-maker."
Other areas of concern (such
as Assembly) have interfered,
she says, but she has supported
motions she thought important.
"I've tried to avoid speaking
for the sake of such," she says.
Has this career in student ac-
tivities been worthwhile? A "full
life" means emphasis on a
variety of areas, Joan believes.
One gets more from his college
life if involved in something
other than studies.
Most valuable in terms of her
development has been "the peo-
ple I've met."
These include administrators,
faculty members and students,
she says.
The Job of Assembly Presi-
dent taught her "to work with
people" and "to organize."
But next year, her senior
year, Joan is going to emphasize
the other side of life.
"I've missed a lot . . . lec-
tures .. . concerts . .. I'm also
considering some kind of a job
to make money."
She is enrolled in the English
honors program, which she feels
is very worthwhile.
It has meant adjusting to a
"new- way" of studying, she
noted. One is given a mass of
material, and can get of it as
much as he's able to master.
"They're trying to instill an
attitude," she said, "so that you
can handle any literary work
afterward."
Joan is looking forward to the
tuturial portion of the senior
honors program, feeling this
will be still more stimulating.
After graduation, she is con-
sidering business administration
study, to enhance her chances
of getting a good job in busi-
ness.

Streamlined
Plan Nears
Completion
Plans for a system of early aca-
demic registration are near com-
pletion, Edward G. Groesbeck,
director of the office of registra-
tion and records, said.
Under the new system, students
could make their own course selec-
tions, mail them in, and have
their time schedule made out for
them.
"This arrangement leaves the
student with no choice of hours
except in cases where work com-
mittments interferred," Groesbeck
said, "but the system has many
advantages."
Registration Simpler
"Registration would be much
simpler, and with the students
choosing their courses earlier, we
could arrange to add or enlarge
sections according to the demand."
Groesbeck noted that counsel-
ing would be available, but would
not be mandatory. "Students
would be expected to see their
counselor to plan his curriculum
according to his needs," he said.
Citing a lack of funds as the
reason for at least a one-year de-
lay in carrying out the plan,
Groesbeck predicted that as soon
as funds were available, the pro-
gram would be installed.
Programs in Effect
"Programs of this nature are
now in effect at Purdue and Ohio
State, and seem to be working. Our
present system, although certainly
not utopian, works pretty well, and
until we come up with something
better, will do the job. It all de-
pends on what the student body
and faculty want."
One of the innovationsGroes-
beck mentioned was the new sys-
tem of filling out one IBM card
during registration, instead of the
usual "railroad ticket." "The IBM
cards can be filled out in about
3 or 4 minutes, compared to about
half an hour for the long form,"
he said, "and if we can only get
the students to fill out one card
legibly enough to read, the system
should prove much more efficient."
On The House
Alpha Kappa Lambda has an-
nounced the its first annual
spring pledge formal will be held
Saturday evening at the Knights
of Columbus Hall.
Music will be provided by the
Dorsey Quartette. Preceding the
dance will be a banquet.
May Fair, the spring pledge for-
mal being presented tonight by
Alpha Omicrcn Pi, will begin at
9 p.m. in their house.
Decorations will consist of
spring flower s and pasted colored
crnaments to carry out the May
Fair theme. A five-piece combo
will provide the music.
- * *.
Sigma Alpha Iota, the profes-
sional music firaternity for wom-
en, will hold its annual May Fes-
tival Luncheon today in the
Union.
Prof. Maynard Klein, director
of the University choirs, will dis-

COMMITTEE PROPOSAL:
Sophomore Prospectus Advocated

The literary college steering
committee decided yesterday to
submit a proposal to the college
advocating the initiation of aj
sophomore prospectus.
The plan of the prospectus,
drawn up by Patricia Petruschke,
'60, states that as a part of the
general counseling procedure, a
student be required to submit aa
written statement before final"
admittance to a field of concen-
tration indicating his educational
objectives and containing infor-
mation useful in helping him plan
to realize these goals.
To Encourage Thought
"This prospectus ought to en-
courage serious thinking on the
student's part about his field of
concentration and will also pro-
vide aid for counselors in becom-
ing acquainted with the student
and more effectively aiding his
plans for the last two under-
graduate years," Miss Petruschke
said.
According to this plan, a stu-
dent would also be asked to pre-
sent a list of courses in all his
fields in which he is interested.'
Sanford Holo, '60, who suggested
this addition, said "This will helpc
a student and his junior-senior
counselor plan a tentative sched-
ule for the final four semesters."
The rationale behind the pros-
pectus states in part, ". . . Learn-
ing is primarily an individual ex-
perience, and education in large
degree a personal responsibilty,
There must be motivation forf
learning, and this is provided andI
sharpened at least in part by'
reasons. Even for him who finds
learning an end in itself, there is
still need for definition, for a
choice of what is to be learned
must be made.
"Besides the informal purpose
of making student-counselor rela-
tions more sympathetic, increased
information for the counselor will
serve a very important practical
end. In addition to the specific
schedule planning with regard to
a major and cognates, he should
be able to guide a student to
other essential courses."
Success Individual
Sherman Silber, '63, felt that
the success of the prospectus plan
rested on an individual basis be-
tween student and counselor. "I
see it is as an encouragement to
counseling rather than a mere
substitute."
The committee also stressed
their hope that this prospectus
offer Grants
To Graduates
More than nine hundred Ful-
bright scholarships will be avail-
able for graduate or pre-doctoral
study in 30 different countries dur-
ing the 1961-62 academic year.
In addition to the Fulbright
awards, scholarships for study will
be offered through the Inter-
American Cultural Convention.
Applications for both programs
will be available on May 20, the
Institute of International Educa-
tion announced recently.
The Fulbright scholarships cover
travel, tuition, books and main-

would not degenerate into a
structured question and answer
form. "I would hate to see a form
restricting the student. It ought
to be a creative effort," Miss Pe-
truschke felt. .
Maurice Zilber, '60, expressed
the thought that the University
and the student each have "the
obligation to have this informa-
tion."
The committee also moved to-

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ward final plans for its conference
on comprehensive exams to be
held at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in the
multi-purpose room of the Under-
graduate Library. Douglas Viel-
metti, '60, will be the student
panelist arguing for the institution
of the senior-year tests and James
Seder, '61, will maintain the op-
posing view. Faculty members of
the panel will be named soon,
Seder said.

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Afterwards there will be
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* * *
Zeta Tau Alpha will h
annual spring formal ton
honor of their pledge cla
dinner and dance will tak
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The Red Carnation Bs
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* * *

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Entertainment will be provided
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JF

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