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May 01, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:I

THlE M CIIv- "AIIAN

SGC Opens
Interviewing
For Board
The Student Government Coun-
cil Student Relations Board will
hold informal interviews tomor-
row and Tuesday.
Interviews will be held in the
SOC offices of the Student Activi-
ties Building from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow and 4 to 5:30 p.m. Tues-
day, Susanne Rockne, '60, board
chairman announced.
The Student Relations Board
is jointly associated with SGC and
the University Development Coun-
cil. Among its various function,
the board acquaints the students
with the purposes of the Develop-
ment Council and the University's
alumni program, and functions as
a related board of SGC to pro-
mote better contact with student
organizations, she said.
Interested Students may sign
up in the SGC offices in the SAB.

Gans Notes Change
iIn Human Relations

PROGRAM NOTES:
Lapesa To Discuss Spanish Literature

By RUTH EVENHUIS
"It seems to me a good year for
human relations," Curtis Gans,
vice-president of the National
Student Association, remarked at
the human rights conference yes-
terday.
Upon noting the changed pat-
tern of race relations in the
United States, he pointed out that
the whites are no longer making,
the decisions; the Negro is now
a partner in deciding what, when
and how.
Gans indicated that the move-
ment is now at the point where it
can be assessed. "The drama is
leaving," he said, "and there is a
need for sustained effort over the
long haul in both the North and
South."
Continue Fight
The Southern Negro students
"will continue to fight for justice
for all in the Southern community

I

DIAL
NO 5-6290

and will do it alone unless we
help.n ns
"But it is incumbent on us to
make their issue our issue and to
determine that none of these stu-:
dents shall have expended his ef-
forts in vain."
He stressed the need for North-
ern moral support, economic sup-
port, and most important, actual
involvement. "There must be more
than moral protest; changes must
be made."
"The local community must be
a primary target in addition to
picketing, fund drives, and letter-
writing." Gans said "the sym-
pathy movement is only a begin-
ning. We must actually fight for
equality for all-until it is a liv-
ing principle. The movement has.
started at the lunch counters, but
it won't stop until men are judged
as individuals, regardless of race.
Committed to Justice
"The movement is characterized
by the dynamic, courageous com-
mitment to the cause of justice,
he said. "It is not a question of
Negro vs. white."
Bernard Lee, student emissary
for the Rev. Martin Luther King,
Jr., stressed the importance of
non-violence, indicating that it
is "the only way to achieve our
goal."
Citing instances of physical vio-
lence against the Negro students,
Lee said "we are aware of the
price of this movement-we have
already paid the down payment."
But he added that the "Dixiecrat"
is unable to understand the non-
violent action, and unable to op-
pose it as he could violence.
He indicated that the southern
students want those in the North
to sign the petitions being circu-
lated against the discriminatory
chain stores; to participate in
demonstrations on May 17, the
anniversary of the Supreme Court
decision in 154; and to maintain
a strict non-violence policy in all
of their activities.
Any deviation from this policy,
he claimed, will be most harmful
to the cause of the Southern
students.

Prof. Rafael Lapesa of the Uni-
versity of Madrid and the Insti-
tute for Humanistic Research at
the University of Wisconsin, will
deliver a lecture, in Spanish, on
"Poesia de cancioneros y poesia
italianizante en los siglos XV al
XVII," tomorrow at 4:15 p.m. in
Rackham Aud.
Lapesa, who is concluding a lec-
ture tour of the Eastern United
States, is an authority on Spanish
medieval literature and linguistics.
English Ceramist .. .
Bernard Leach, a Japanese
trained English, ceramist will
speak on "East and West in Art
and Thought" at 7 p.m. Tuesday
in the Architecture Aud.
Leach has a Visiting Artist fel-
lowship to the University from the
Institute of Contemporary Arts.
Paris Engineer. . .
Paris engineer, Robert le Rico-
lais will discuss "Dynamic Con-
cepts of Structure" at 3:30 to-
morrow in the Architecture Aud.
THE
PROMETHEAN
OPEN DAILY
at 2 P.M.
Entertainment Nightly
In cooperation with the
1960 Conference for Hu-
man Rights S.G.C. Cine-
ma Guild is presenting a
program of films at 4:00
P.M. Sunday at Architec-
ture Auditorium. Admis-
sion is free. The films to
be shown ore the lynching
and trial scenes from
Fritz Lang's 1937 film
FURY and both parts of
Edward Murrow's fea-
ture-length documentary,
REPORT FROM AFRICA.

{

l

'NOT TO BE MISSED"-Herald-Tribune
"VIVID, CRACKLING ACTION"-World Tele.
ALL THAT IS
UNCONQUERABLE
THAT IS
UNVANQUISHED
IN WOMAN
IS IN
BURT AUDREY
HECHT-H LL-AANCA$TER pmeent
ANCASI[R'I[PBURN
t JOHN
AUDIE JOHN CHARLES LI JOSMPH WIS8m1
SAI.E1Ts JUNE WALER
MURBT~SAfi BCKFRDI A.BRTTECHNICLO0

Le Ricolais has been a visiting
professor here and at the Uni-
versities of Illinois and Pennsyl-
vania and North Carolina State
College.
Editors' Panel ..
A panel of literary editors will
discuss "The New Noise in Ann'
Arbor: Writing" at 8 p.m. Tuesday
in the West Conference Rm. of
Rackham.
Anne Doniger, '60, co-editor of
Generation, the University literary
magazine, Bob Davis, '61, editor
of "Arbor" and Lalit Udani, Grad.,
editor of, "Abishek," will partici-
pate in the discussion.
Discuss Fallout.. .
"Fallout" and its effect will be
discussed at noon today on WWJ-
TV.

Guests Edward Epstine of the
University Research institute and
Prof. John Nehemias of the public
health school will discuss the ef-
fects of radiation on agriculture
and food supplies and how the size
of a nuclear explosion 'determines
the general worldwide circulation
pattern of its fallout.
Poetry Exhibit
An exhibit on "French Poetry
Today" will be on display in the
cases of the General Library
through this week.
It consists of a collection of
photographs, autographed manu-
scripts, proofs of poems by con-
temporary French.poets and books
and records of poetry readings. It
is the first presentation in America
of the poetic renaissance in
France.

S.G.C
Cinemal q fI
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
"'BRINGING UP BABY"
with
Cary Grant, Katherine Hepburn
Short:
Seven Guideposts to Good Design
A RCH ITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

I,

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mmmmw I

THE THEATRE EVENT OF THE YEAR!

DAVID WAYNE

GERRY JEDD

CHARLES HOHMAN

MONICA LOVETT

ROBERT CARRAWAY

KIM HUNTER

The Ann Arbor

1960 DRAMA SEASON

A Star-Filled

Festival of

Exciting

Plays

May 17--21
"A WINNING FARCE!"
- Brooks Atkinson
DAVID WAYNE
in Lorenzo Semple's brand new hit
"The Golden Fleecing"
The fleet's in and raring to go in this hilarious
account of a group of sailors out to break the
bank at Monte Carlo.
with
LARRY HAGMAN
Monica Lovett, Donna Pearson and
Robert Carraway, Mickey Deems of
the original Broadway cast.

* * * * *
May 24-28
"DRAMATIC FIRECRACKERSI"
- Walter Winchell
KIM CHARLES

HUNTER

HOHMAN

in William Inge's best play
"Dark At The Top
Of The Stairs"
One of the most popular Broadway successes
of recent seasons, this play is a warm and
human family drama set in Oklahoma during
the oil boom of the 1920's.
with
ETHEL BRITTON
* * * * *

* * * * *
May 31-June 4
"IRRESISTIBLE FUN!"
--Walter Kerr
ROBERT Q. LEWIS
in Alec Coppel's mystery-comedy hit
"The Gazebo"
Exciting and funny, this play concerns a jovial
writer of TV mysteries who finds himself in-
volved in the harum-scarum murder of a black-
mailer threatening his wife.
with
PATRICIA SMITH
STEPHEN ELLIOTT

June 7-11
"A ROMANTIC DELIGHT!"
- John Chapman

DANA
ANDREWS

GERRY
JEDD

in William Gibson's smash hit drama
"Two For the Seesaw"
Fresh from a two-year run on Broadway, this
play details the romance of an Iowa lawyer
and an earthy Bronx hoyden who find love in
their mutual loneliness.

Counter Sale of Season Tickets Opens Tomorrow, 10 A.M.
MAIL ORDERS STILL ACCEPTED - TICKETS FOR INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCES ON SALE MAY 6

E

Thursday) Main

SEASON TICKET PRICES
Floor $14, $12. Balcony $14, $12, $10. (Friday and Saturday) Main Floor
Matinees (Thursday and Saturday) Main Floor $10. Balcony $10, $8.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

$16.50, $14. Balcony $16.50, $14, $11.50

- w,,- 7110MUS-11 III.&MANI .

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