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April 26, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I.LJ dZMA

t, .

; t s

irc wardt
med New

LOCAL DEMOCRAT:
Prof. Cutler Tells Plans
To Run for State Senate

LI Head

of. Albert H. Marckwardt of
English department was
ed acting director of the Eng-
Language Institute at the Re-
s' meeting Friday,
will replace Prof. Robert
of the English department
is resigning to accept a posi-
at Georgetown University.

Prof. Richard L. Cutler, who
was granted leave by the Regents
to seek election to a state Legisla-
ture post, has announced he will
run for the state Senate on the
Democratic ticket.
Stating his intentions, Cutler
said, "Over the past few years, I
have watched with growing alarm
the antics of a small group of old-

M N

DIAL NO 5-6290
* ENDS THURSDAY *
When that lady walks in..
all restraint flies out!
TONY D:AN JMNT
CURTIS. MARTIN LEIGH

guard members of the state Sen-
ate, who have blocked every ef-
fort at progress and reform in our
state government.
"Their behavior came to a cli-
max in 1959 and 1960 when, based
upon what seemed to be political
expediency and sheer bull-head-
edness, they deeply hurt the rep-
utation of our state and made us
a laughing stock in other areas of
the country."
Cutler said he would devote
himself to restoring Michigan
government to a high level and
for constitutional revision, should
it be necessary.
"Even though I am not a pro-
fessional politician," Cutler con-
tinued, "I believe that my back-
ground and experience enables me
to understand the needs of people
in all walks of life. I grew up in
a rural area, have worked in fac-
tories and as a construction work-
er, and I am part owner of a
small business. As a psychologist,
I come in daily contact with
THE
PROMETH EAN
OPEN DAILY
at 2 P.M.
Entertainment -Nightly

SGC Invites
Suggestions
For Topics
Suggestions for topics for the
Student Government Council.
Reading and Discussion Program
to be held again this summer and
next fall are now welcomed by
the planning committee, Chairman
Roger Seasonwein, '61, said yes-
terday.
Initiated last year, the program
consists of summer reading on
various topics followed by faculty-
student discussion seminars held
during the following semester.
Seasonwein stated that this
year "an even more diversified"
program was being planned. He
also said there might be a co-
ordination between the Reading
and Discussion Program and
Challenge.
Tentative topics include the
evolution of physics from New-
tonian to relativity; philosophy of
ethics; Greek literature; political
theory; and the works of D. H.
Lawrence.
Additional topics may be sug-
gested by filling out a form at the
table in the lobby of the Under-
graduate Library.-
Students will be able to sign up
for the Program in approximately
three weeks after which reading
lists will be mailed out. These lists
will include both prfmary and
supplementary readings dealing
with the various subjects.
The seminars will convene in,
the fall and continue meeting as
long as students and faculty mem-
bers are interested.
Last year about 1,000 persons
participated in the program, which
included two series.

MEETING HERE:
Prepare for Human Rights Conference

PROF. RICHARD CUTLER
...*to run for Senate
the personal concerns of many
people. ..'
Tht Senate post that dcutler will
seek is being vacated by Sen. Lewis
Christmas (R-Ann Arbor) who
will retire at the end of the cur-
rent term.
Funds Given
t oNAACP
Last Sunday, Brereton Bissell,
'61, presented $1,050 to the local
chapter of the NAACP.
The money represented the first

Final preparations are now be-
ing made for the Conference for
Human Rights in the North to be
held on campus this weekend.
About 400 students from more
than 40 colleges and universities
are expected to attend the meet-
ing; which begins Thursday and
runs through Sunday. Most of the
schools represented are in the
east and the midwest. Busses will
bring groups from New York City
and Athens, Ohio.
Al Haber, '60, conference coor-
dinator, held a meeting recently
to explain the conference to in-
terested University students. Ap-
proximately 75 students attended
and 60 to 70 are expected to at-
tend the conference. Representa-
tives from the Ann Arbor Human
Relations Conference and the Hu-
man Relations Board of Student
Government Council will also at-
tend.
The conference is sponsored by
the Students for Democratic So-
ciety, a group affiliated with the
League for Industrial Democracy.
The League is an educational,
non-profit and non-partisan or-
ganization founded in 1905. It is
concerned with the social and
economic problems of an indust-
rial society.
Action-oriented
Haber explained that the con-
ference, whose local sponsor is the
Political Issues Club, is action-
oriented. It ,hopes to show stu-
dents the areas in which they can
work effectively to end discrim-
ination and the most effective
methods to employ.
"We are now in the midst of a
movement on the part of students
for human rights, the scope of
which we could not have imagined
A few months ago. We want to
make surethat the momentum of
this movement will not die out.
"We want to channel it into
continuing programs for social
action on the basic Northern
problems -housing, employment,
and the rest."
"This work is not dramatic,"
he explained, "but it must be
done." The conference will out-
line techniques for making pro-
gress in the fight against discrim-
ination in areas such as housing
and employment. Haber hopes
that a coordinated program, for

A UGHT-
HEARTED
SER AT LOVE
AMONG THE
ADULTSI

handling many of these problems
will emerge.
King May Attend
The Rev. Martin Luther King,
Jr., will attempt to come to Ann
Arbor to deliver the keynote ad-
dress. If he is detained by legal
battles in Alabama and unable
to attend the conference, he will
send one of his associates.
Morris Milgram, building con-
tractort involved in inter-racial
housing development in Deerfield,
Ill., will speak at the conference.
Milgram, the president of Mod-
ern Community Developers, has
been building interracial develop-
ments for nearly ten years. His
most notable projects have been
in Princeton, N.J., and just out-
side of Philadelphia.
Milgram works carefully with
the communities involved in an
attempt to prepare the commun-
ity for his development. The Deer-
field situation is the first time
that he has become involved in
court action.
List Topics
Other speakers will be James
Farmer, national program direct-
or of the National Association for
the Advancement of Color e d
People, and Lt. Gov. John Swain-
son.
Among the specific topics to be
Pole Leader
Makes Speech
For Students
POLAND - An impressive bat-
tery of Polish governmental and
Party personalities, led by Party
First Secretary Wladslaw Gomulka
and Premier Cyrankiewicz, at-
tended the fourth congress of the
Polish Student Union (ZSP) held
in Warsaw from March 24-27.
The main address, delivered by
Gomulka, took on heightened in-
terest and significance in view of
the recent tightening of Party
control over Poland's intellectual
life.
The Communist leader's speech
concentrated on the need for
young intellectuals to adjust their
interests to "the spirit of the
times" and to make "an active
political commitment, and [iden-
tifyl . . . their aims and views
with the aims and views of the
working class Party."
"The reform in Polish educa-
tion is well underway," he an-
nounced, with. the aim to better
prepare students "for their pro-
fessional work and life in the Soc-
ialist community." It will accom-
plish this in part by orienting
academic study toward achieving
practical results -- in short, the
usual Communist expediency of
linking production with education.
The primary task for the ZSP,
Gomulka declared, was to mold
the spirit as well as the training
of the Polish student: "to fulfill
your important role in the ideo-
political training of students and
in shaping their social views and
Socialist attitude."

discussed are: increasing Negro
employment opportunities, voter
registration and political oppor-
tunities, integrating housing, sym-
pathetic action for the Southern
movement, direct non-violent ac-
tion, fraternities and sororities,
integration in campus activities
and social life, developing the ac-
tion potential of the Negro com-
munity, higher education, pro-
grams for minority group youth,
the mass movement and leader-
ship training programs.
The work on the conference has
been going on all fall. Recently,
Charles Van Tassel, an employee
of SDS, came to Ann Arbor to
assist organizing the effort.
Quadrants Tap
New Members
Proclaiming the stout virtues of
ale - quaffing, wench-joshing, and
arb-roaming, the sturdy band of
yeomen, known as Quadrants, sal-
lied forth to rout from the forests
of Kwaddie-land the loutish
rogues that lurk there, hoping to
impress on such knaves the solid
values of true yeomanry.
So routed and seized were:
Bruce Baldwin, '61, Lawrence
Brink, '61A&D, Robert S. Holm,
'61, Gary Joachim, '62E, John
Marshall, '62E, Garry McDaniels,
'62, Gerald Meyer, Grad., Thomas
Moch, '62E, John Richardson, '62,
John Ross, '62A&D, Jack Schwem,
'62E.
DIAL NO 2-6264
ENDING WEDNESDAY
METRO-GOLDWYN.MAYER
pruonis
DORMS DAY DAD NIYt
A WSUt! M9IT0ff lt
W6MIIM
(!im pII I- .ues eiI

FOUR.

Show Biz'
Ticket Sales
"Show Biz, U.S.A., the .New-
berry-Gomberg Michigras produc-
tion, received the award for high-
est ticket, sales at the carnival.
The show featured a series of
Original numbers presented by
the dancers and vocal talents of
of the two housing units. Music
and lyrics were written by Larry
Kass, '60, and the booth designed
by Paul Lin, Ron Lee, and Ray
Cato, '61A&D.

ftf:
I

FRESHMEN

Stars of

Capital Records Apaiga

The Fabulous

PEASE

FRIDAY_______
BURT LANCASTER
AUDREY HEPBURN
in
"THE UNFORGIYEN"
Phone NO 2-4786

portion of money collected in a
campus bucket drive and contri-
buted by SGC and a local religious Korean Group
guild. The money will go to the
NAACP Legal Fund for Southern Ii.
students and the Southern StudentTo H olicnic
Fund of the NSA.
Student Government Council The Korean Student Club will
contributed $100 to the fund. hold a picnic Saturday at Ken-
----------_ _sington Park picnic area.
Students will meet at 11 a.m. at
Lane Hall and proceed to the pic-
nic grounds from there. In case
of rain by 9 a.m.. the outing will

Auditorium
Ypsilanti, Mich.
Tues., May 3
8:00 P.M.A
Tickets 2.00, 1.50

Classified Advertising

11 No . -

OPENING

TOMORROW 8:00 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

be postponed to Sunday, May 1.
For further information, con-
tact David Uh, NO 8-7137.

on sale at

THURSDAY

_. __ - --- ----__ _ _ _ ._ _. :en . _ ____ ___ :. .
._ __ '°_' 1

Bob Marshall's
211 S. State

JERRY LEWIS in '
"Visit to a Small Planet"

LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL
Ketti Frings' Pulitzer prize-winning adaptation
of the Thomas Wolfe novel

The

U

THR U SATURDAY
$1.50, $1.10, 75c

International Student Association
will announce the PRESIDENT and
VICE-PRESIDENT for next year
on May 12.
PETITIONS NOW AVAILABLE IN Room 18,
International Center between 9-5 P.M. daily.
Petitions are due not later than Friday, April 29
at 5:00 P.M.

Ending
Thursday

ACADEMY
AWARD
WINNERr
t4 i' EASTMAN(OLOR
A Lopl Fim. Inc. Relom
'* Friday *
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
"BRINK OF LIFE"

W~i Wk CANN4ES
FILM FESTIVAL

2ND
BIG, WEEK
DIAL NO 8-6416

Tickets available for Wednesday & Thursday performances only.
Box office open today until 5:00, rest of week from 10:00 A.M.
-Dept. of Speech

I

S

E

L

I

I

Plus:

THE GATEWAY SINGERS

;'

TWO SHOWS

I

fI

WED., MAY 4

-7 and 9:30 P.M.

I

ANN ARBOR HIGH SCHOOL

0A A~'~wr

e) C , tl n A

I L am'_.1

- - - - - _ _ - - _

- _

II

_ _ _KI lr YL (II ~ '~ ' I~ II I V ~ fl 'far'itc r ~ wr .

.. ::,

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