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April 22, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PQ THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, A

Tupper Says Medical Bill
Would Not Achieve Purpose
ByAMDY HAWLEY commented that, while physicians
Prof. Charles J. Tupper, assocI- might suffer very little economic
ate dean of the medical school, loss under such a system, costs
aid yesterday the proposed Forand would probably increase and qual-
bill would fail to provide medical ity would tend to decline.
care for the people it is supposed He said that experiments in
to, cover. governmentally-controlled health
Prof. Tupper was one of six peo- plans seem to show this to be true,
ple connected with the medical and that the right of free choice
professions who comprised a medi- of a physician Is important.
cal careers panel at the Under-
graduate Library yesterday after- Last In Series
noon. The panel was the last ,f a
He explained that among the 14 series of careers panels this year.
to 15 million Americans over 65, Its members discussed employ-
two million are unable to provide ment opportunities and advantages
for medical treatment. The pro- in the several medical professions,
posed legislation would be sup- including dentistry, nursing, gen-
ported by social security taxes and eral practice and pharmacy.
would only cover those who are The speakers stressed the in-
on social security, creasing need for qualifled per-
Would Not Qualify sonnel in each field. As an ex-
"But," he went on, "the two mil- ample, Prof. Tupper said that in
lion in need of such care are not order to satisfy the demand for
on social security and therefore more physicians, 14 to 20 more
would not qualify to receive it." medical schools will have to be
In response to a question about begun by 1961 and finished by
socialized medicine, Prof. Tupper 1971.

Wethey To Teach Class
At Mexican University

VISIT CONGRESSMEN:
Students Protest Disclaimer Affidavit

O ' -

JAMES M. DAVIS
. .. takes office

come, dream with us.

ANN ARBOR FOLK & JAZZ SOCIETY
Presents:

Davis gains
Association
Pres idency
James M. Davis, director of the
International Center, was installed
yesterday as president of the Na-
tional Association of Foreign Stu-
dent Advisers.
Ceremonies were held at the an-
nual meeting, in Denver, Colorado,
of the 900-member organization.
This group, operating partly under
a Ford Foundation grant, serves
as a liason between American and
foreign sponsors of international
students and the affiliated organi-
zations on 450 United States cam-
puses.
Davis served as executive secre-
tary of the 1948 Conference on In-
ternational Educational Exchanges
at which NAFSA was organized,
as NAFSA director and vice-presi-
dent.
At the International Center,
Davis directs non-academic coun-
seling and housing assistance for
international students and co-
ordinates with national and in-
ternational agencies.
The University normally enrolls
about 1,500 international students
and visiting scholars, the largest
number on a single United States
campus. This was the first univer-
sity to receive a Distinguished
Service Award from the Institute
of Internal Education.
At this meeting. Robert B. Kling-
er, International Center senior
counselor, was again named chair-
man of the NAFSA Research and
Surveys Committee.
Davis is also an associate pro-
fessor of higher education, and he
is on the faculty of the Michigan
Center for the Study of Higher
Education.
Seat Officers
Of Assembly
The 1960-61 officers and com-
mittee chairmen of Assembly As-
sociation were installed in their
new offices yesterday afternoon at
the League.
Members of the incoming ex-
ecutive board are: president, Myra
Goines, '61; 1st vice-president, Jo
Sawyer, '62; 2nd vice-president,
Marilyn Johnson, '62; secretary,
Marylou Seldon, 62 and treasurer,
Judith Levine, '62. Others are
orientation chairman, Joan Wein-
berg, '62; projects chairman, Joan
Studnicky, '61Ed; social chairman,
Delores Gelios, '62, and activities-
scholarship chairman, Amy Band,
'62SM
EUR O PE
We'll see the usual PLUS.
You're not herded around
A college tour that's different
EUROPE SUMMER TOURS
225 Sequoia Box 2 Pasadena, Calif.

By BEATRICE TEODORO
During July and August, Prof.
Harold E. Wethey, of the history
of art department, will teach at
the University of Mexico, spon-
sored by the educational exchange
program of the United States
State Department.
Prof. Wethey will present a
course in English in Latiri Ameri-
can art, with an emphasis on Peru,
to Americans studying under the
University of Mexico's summer
program.
He will also give individual guest
lectures in Spanish in the regular
University courses, on Latin Amer-
ican art and contemporary paint-
ing.
Spanish Art Authority
As an authority on Spanish and
Latin American art, Prof. Wethey
has traveled widely as an educa-
tor. In 1943, again sponsored by
an inter-educational program of
the State Department, he taught
at the University of Tucuman in
northern Argentina, and lectured
in other South American countries.
He has also taught at the Insti-
tute of Spanish American Studies
iIn La Rabida, Spain, which is con-
nected with the University of Se-
ville.
In 1957, for his extensive work
and interest in the field of Spanish
art, Prof. Wethey washinvited to
become a member of the Spanish
Names Task
Of Courts
The University's "Law Review"
recently carried an article stressing
the importance of maintaining
America's universal civil rights
tradition.
Associate Justice William C.
Douglas cited this as the greatest
task facing the legal profession
today.
Because the impact of events in
United States courts will be felt
internationally, he said it is im-.
perative that "we uphold our
tradition of eequality for all peo-
ple, irregardless of race, wealth,
religion or color."
"The role of courts-independ-
ent and supreme in their own do-
main-will be increasing as the
new nations of the world emerge.
Our own constitution has served
as a model for many of these
young nations," he added,
Immediate Effect
"The actions of our judges and
lawyers here in America have an
immediate effect on many other
systems. This can be seen in the
numerous foreign court opinions
filled with citations of our own
decisions.
"The major problems of the
newly emerging countries are not
entirely economic. They start with
the need to develop viable so-
cieties along democratic lines. A
system of checks and balances is
involved," he noted, "as well as
restraints on the powers of the
majority, while maintaining the
protection of minorities. Moreover,
it means an independent jury,"
Justice Douglas added.
Endanger Development
"We're not the only ones," he
said, stating that there are coun-
tries so infected with religious and
I racial hatreds as to endanger any
complete democratic development.
"Freedom of speech and press
are made to suffer, when for in-
stance, the criticism of a prime
minister is deplored and labeled
a monstrous offense.
"In these and many other ways,"
Justice Williams said, "the rights
of man are again put in jeopardy,
once independence is acquired.
The American example is, there-
fore, of continuing importance
both at home and abroad."

HAROLD E. WETHEY
... to go to Mexico

Academy of Fine Arts, an honor
which he prizes highly.
To Author Book
Although he has published many
books and articles about colonial
architecture and sculpture in Latin
America, Prof. Wethey's true spe-
cialty is Spanish art. At present

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By The University Press Service
Students from East Coast col-
leges and universities traveled to
Washington Wednesday to voice
their protests of the NDEA dis-
claimer affidavit personally to
their Congressmen.
Approximately 25 students from
four states left New York early
Wednesday morning in an effort
to discuss the matter before the
bill reaches the Senate floor. The
states are Pennslyvania, New Jer-
sey, West Virginia and New York.
Should the bill pass the Senate,
it will climax a long battle first
for repeal of both the affirmative
oath and the disclaimer affidavit
of the National Defense Education
Act, and later for repeal only of
the disclaimer. Last year a bill by
Senators John Kennedy (D-Mass)
and Joseph Clark (D-Penn) call-
ing for repeal of both the oath
and the affidavit was returned to
committee.
Bill Draws Near
Activity has stepped up as the
date for Senate consideration of
the Kennedy, Clark and Javits
bill draws near. At the University
of Texas the Students' Associa-
tion passed a resolution opposing
the affidavit and The Daily Texan
commented, "At least some or-
ganized group on this campus has
taken a stand on the NDEA dis-
claimer affidavit." The paper has
long opposed the loyalty provisions
of the Act.
When Vassar Joined the group
of colleges and universities refus-
ing NDEA funds until the dis-
claimer affidavit is repealed, the
campus newspaper said, "We are
indeed glad finally to flind in
public print that Vassar has af-
firmed the only position that a
free, democratic liberal arts in-
stitution can possibly take towards
the horrendous Section IIIa of the
NDEA." But, added the paper's
editor, "our firm stand totters and
indeed collapses unless it is ac-
companied by firm positive ac-
tion." She urged the student body
to use the "voice of mass protest"
in supporting the Vassar stand.
Faculty Approves
It was the faculty at Hunter
College that followed in the foot-
steps of the students by approving
a resolution protesting the dis-
claimer affidavit. The resolution
attacks the disclaimer affidavit
section and urges its repeal be-
cause it, "requires a loan appli-
cant to foreswear freedom of
belief. This we consider to be a
requirement which cannot prop-

erly be imposed on any American
citizen."
The student governing bodies of
both Hunter campuses have voiced
firm protests against the dis-
claimer affidavit.
While the president of DePaul
University contended that the
university's position regards the
oath and the affidavit as reason-
able requirements of governments,
students cited varying opinions in
a poll conducted by the DePaulia,
the student newspaper.
Said one student, "I feel that
the disclaimer affidavit is un-
necessary. It is a bit of the witch
hunt left over from the days of
McCarthy. Basically it is insulting
to the integrity of the individual."
"No matter what financial diffi-
culties I find myself in," he con-
tinued, "I would not sign the dis-
claimer. I have no objection 'to
County GOP
Backs Nixon
Washtenaw County Republicans
adopted a resolution Wednesday
night at their spring convention
endorsing Vice-President Richard
M. Nixon as their choice for the
party's presidential ,nomination.
Congressman Gerald R. Ford of
Grand Rapids was also backed by
the group for vice-president.
In other resolutions, the GOP
supported the one-cent sales tax
increase as an alternative to the
state income tax, and stressed
concern over lack of voting rights
for Negroes in the United States.
Thirty - six delegates and an
equal number of alternates were
chosen to the Republican state
convention to be held May 13-14
In Grand Rapids.

stand up and be counted as a
loyal American' but when it comes
to receiving money for an educa-
tion in a democratic country, this
affidavit becomes a gross insult to
my intelligence and symbolizes
the start of governmental control
over free opinion and freedom of
private and individual belief and
conscience."
Another student took the oppo-
site position saying, "I believe
that the loyalty oath is a good
idea, because if a student is will-
ing to accept aid from the govern-
ment toward his education, the
least he can do is swear he does
not advocate overthrow, of the
government.*
Some Support
While criticism of the affidavit
grows, a number of small-college
officials and students have rallied
to the support of the affidavit.
When speaking of the colleges
who have withdrawn from the
NDEA program as protests against
the loyalty provisions, President
Kevin McCann of Defiance Col-
lege in Ohio, said the withdrawals
violate the academic freedom they
pretend to support.
"For me personally," he said,
"to deny the students or persuade
the college to deny them the op-
portunity to make their own deci-:
sions would be an exercise of arbi-
trary power or a case of Big
Brotherism."
Prof. E. Merrill Root, of the
English department at Earlham
College, said the oath is a privi-
lege and not a punishment.
An active group called the "tu-
dent Committee for the Loyalty
Oath," headed by Douglas Caddy,
Georgetown University senior, has
been collecting support for the
oath among college students.
Caddy reports representatives
from 25 colleges on his steering
committee.

A

*1

'"SHE IJIEY
ERMAN
plus the
GATEWAY SINGERS

he is finishing a book on El Greco
which he hopes will be published
next year.
Doing research for this book, he
traveled throughout the United
States and Europe. He spent a'
year in Spain, and during the
1958-59 academic year, did re-
search in Italy under a Fulbrigbt'
grant.
In fact, during the last ten
years, Prof. Wethey has spent a
summer in Mexico, two summers
and a year in Spain and a year in
Italy. He also took his first trip
to California.
ISA Petitions
For Offices
'Now Accepted
Petitioning for International
Students' Association president
and vice-president is now open.
All students who have paid their
one dollar membership fee to ISA
by May 2 may vote. The president
and vice-president are elected to-
gether on one ticket. The only
stipulation is that they cannot
both be from the same country
and no two can run together for
two consecutive terms.
The president can run with a
person of his choice, and after
elections he or she appoints the
secretary, treasurer and committee
chairmen.
"I have asked for petitions with
a statement of platform this year,
designed to require a little work
on the part of the prospective
candidate," M. A. Hyder Shah,
ISA president, revealed. When a
statement of platform is based on
a questionnaire, that makes the
prospective candidate think about
the organization. Holding office in
this organization requires thought,
planning and vision," he added.
All petitions must be submitted
by 5 p.m. April 29. Ballots will
be mailed to all paid members
and must be mailed back or drop-
ped in Rm. 18 of the International
Center by May 11. Results will
be announced at a tea at the
International Center, 4:30 to 6
p.m. May 12. Following the tea
at which election results will be
announced, the formal installation
ceremonies will be held.
According to the ISA constitu-
tion, "elections will be conducted
by an elections committee to be
appointed by the ISA executive
board. No candidate for office may
serve on the committee."

1

.4

I 'U

o ai
No 2-6264

H ELD OVER !
TIHE
OPROARIOU9
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Two Shows - 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Tickets $4.40, 3.30, 2.75, 2.20, 1.65
(plenty of good seats still available)
On sale at Bob Marshall's - 211 S. State
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
LENI RIEFENSTAHL'S
4I/
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SHORT: THE RINK (Chaplin)
SATURDAY and SUNDAY
at 7:00 and 9:00
"THE MAN BETWEEN"
with
JAMES MASON, CLAIRE BLOOM,
HILDEGARDE NEFF

4

Social Work
Institute, Set
The eighth annual Social Work
Progress Institute will be held on
the Michigan campus today.
This conference, sponsored by
the social work school, its alumni,
and the extension service, features
a report on the White House con-
ference on children and youth
and a Jane Addams Memorial
Lecture.
During the morning the social
casework treatment of offenders
on probation, the impersonal con-
text of personal problems, the
White House conference on youth
and the clinical approach to juve-
nile delinquency will be discussed.
In the afternoon Dean F. F.
Fauri of the school of social work
is to discuss developments in his
school.

DAVID
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