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February 10, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I I

Weber Gives
Resignation
To Governor
LANSING ()-Paul W. Weber
announced yesterday he will step
out Mar. 15 after 11 years as press
secretary to Democratic Gov. G.
Mennen Williams.
The Governor, still undecided
about trying for a nationally un-
precedented seventh term, said, "I
shall lose a strong right arm."
Weber, 54 years old, is resign-
ing a $13,000 a year post subject
to tides of political change in
favor of a new $15,000 a year pro-
tected position with the state civil
service commission.
Observers Divided
Weber said his move shed no
light on the No. 1 political ques-
tion :.in Lansing -- whether Wil-
liams will run again. Political ob-
servers are divided on the issue and
have been for months.
A former Detroit newspaper.
man, Weber came with the Gov-
ernor after his first election in,
1948 and soon established himself
as a vital tog in the long Williams
regime.
He is credited with a major role
in helping popularize the Gov-
ernor with voters through the
green polka dot tie symbol and
by encouraging the Governor's
square-dancing talents.
Beyond his widely recognized
talents as a gifted press agent,
Weber was a key adviser to the
Governor, one whose counsel was
leaned on many a time.
Great Help
In a statement today, Williams
said his trusted aide "greatly
helped mold and execute public
policy."
Once, a Republican adversary
was moved to direct campaign
barbs against "G. Weber Wil-
Weber told newsmen that in his
new job he will be disqualified
from active participation in a
political campaign - whether
Williams runs or not.
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President Asks Action
By Congress To Lower
Cost of Wheat Surplus

Khrushchev To Tour Asia;
Makes Old Berlin Demands

ON THE BARRICADES - Rebellious Algerian colons manned
barricades in Algiers to protest de Gaulle's self-determination
policies. De Gaulle's victory is seen as proving the power of the
central government over the colons.
De Gaulle Victo-ryShow-s
Loss of Algerian Power
By PHILIP SHERMAN I

The significance of President
DeGaulle's victory over the Alger-
ian settlers is that he has shown
they no longer have any "veto
power" over the central govern-
ment, Prof. Roy Pierce of the po-
litical science department said re-
cently.
The victory can lead to greater
chance of success for DeGaulle's
self-determination plan, too.
Added Confidence
Moslem leaders, on whom a set-
tlement depends, will have added
confidence in deGaulle's ability to
carry out his promises, though'
they are still adopting a wait-and-
see attitude toward the present re-
organization of the army and gov-
ernment in Algeria, Prof. Pierce
continued.
(There have been several cabi-
net changes in recent days, and
politically questionable personnel
in Algeria are being replaced with
men loyal to deGaulle and the
principle of self-determination.)
Prof. Pierce said he expected the
reorganization to be successful
because of the large amount of
popular support deGaulle pres-
ently enjoys.

The
from
gained
ment.

support, he added, springs
the confidence deGaulle
by the Free French move-

Offers Basis
DeGaulle's self - determination
plan, Prof. Pierce said, "seems to
>ffer a fruitful basis for solving
the question.Whether it does and
how easily this is accomplished
depends on the developments with
respect to military organizations in
Algeria and the estimate of the
Moslem nationalist leaders of de-
Gaulle's power to carry out self-
determination,"
Prof. Pierce explained that the
army has in the past opposed the
deGaulle plan because it has suf-
fered many colonial reverses
which it has believed are the fault
of the civilian political leadership.
Consequently, remaining in Al-
eia has become a "matter of
pride."
Prof. Pierce pointed out, though,
that the officer corps is not com-
pletely united in political opin-
ion; there are supporters as well
as opponents of deGaulle's self-
determination.

Challenges
Legislature
For Solution
Ike 'Will Approve'
Any Constructive Act
WASHINGTON (1?) - President
Dwight D. Eisenhower presented
his election year farm program
yesterday and challenged the
Democratic-controlled Congress to
come up with a better solution to
the critical wheat surplus prob-
lem than he proposed.
"I will approve any constructive
solution," Eisenhower said. Thus,
as expected, he modified past ada-
ministration insistence that the
wheat crisis be met by lowering
price supports and eliminating
production controls.
Expensive Situation
But in his special message, the
President stressed that it is im-
perative for Congress to move
promptly to deal with a situation
that is costing the government $1.5
million every day-$1,000 a min-
ute to stabilize wheat prices and
income.
Without prompt action by both
Congress and the government, he
said, "this entire program will
collapse under the pressure of pub-
lic indignation and thousands of
our farming people will be hurt."
Eisenhower's message was gen-
erally welcomed by Republicans,
including some who had opposed
his previous proposals. Many of
the GOP legislators said the Presi-
dent has put the problem where it
belongs, up to Congress.
Brings Hope
Some Democrats called Eisen-
hower's proposals disappointing.
But Chairman Allen J. Elender
(D-La.) of the Senate Agriculture
Committee said the message "casts
a ray of hope that we may soon
enact wheat legislation."
However, Ellender said, If there
is to be any real cooperation be-
tween Congress and the adminis-
tration in enacting wheat legisla-
tion "it is necessary that we obtain
the active support" of Secretary
of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson.
Benson has been under particu-
larly heavy fire since Eisenhower
last year vetoed a bill that would
have required wheat growers to
cut their planting in return for
higher price supports.
Eisenhower's message outlined
four recommendations outside his
solution to the wheat problem.
1. A three-year extension of the
Soil Bank land retirement pro-
gram and an expansion from the
present 28 million acres to 69 mil-
lion acres. This program is de-
signed to help curtail overproduc-
tion.
2. A vigorous advancement of
the government's food for peace
program to combat hunger by
moving U.S. surpluses to needy
areas abroad.
3. An aggressive research pro-
gram to develop new markets and
new uses for farm products.
4. A expansion of the rural de-
velopment program to help low
income families find better oppor-
tunity on and off the land.

SUPPORTS PRESIDENT:
Twining Opposes Plan
To Expand Sub Program

Moscow, (M-X-Nikita Khrushchev
departs today on a new barnstorm-
ing tour in Asia, leaving behind
him a diplomatic colony puzzled
by his blunt pre-summit demands
on the key international issues of
Germany and West Berlin.
The foreign diplomatic corps in,
Moscow, which witnessed his ani-
mated exchange of views with vis-
iting Italian President Giovanni
Gronchi, has been invited to be
present when the premier takes
off from Vnukovo Airport for
India.
President Gronchi is not sched-
uled to leave Moscow until to-
morrow. He is spending today in
Leningrad, freshly and personally
briefed by a candid Khrushchev
on the Soviet position with regard
to the German and Berlin ques-
tions. The Soviet premier still de-
mands that the big powers sign
separate treaties with Communist
East and federal West Germany
and that the occupation status of
Berlin be ended by making West
Merlin a "free city".

WASHINGTON (P) - The na-
tion's top military chief yesterday
opposed the Navy's new proposal
to thrust the Polaris program for-
ward by building six more of the
missile - firing submarines than
present plans allow.
Gen. Nathan F. Twining, chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,
rejected the plan only a day after
it was disclosed by Adm. Arleigh
A. Burke, chief of naval opera-
tions-and from the same forum,
a hearing of the Senate Space
Committee and Preparedness Sub-
committee.
Supports Burke
But Republican Sen. Norris Cot-
ton of New Hampshire came to
Burke's support, urging President
Eisenhower to accept the admiral's
proposal to spend another 975
million dollars tosbuild six addi-
tional Polaris subs.
"If you want terrific striking
power at minimum cost - this is
it," Cotton said in a speech for
the Senate.
Under questioning, of tripham-
mer intensity at times, Twining
testified he, doesn't go along with
Gen. Thomas S. Power's view that
Power's force of long range bomb-
ers should be put on 24-hour air-
borne alert as soon as possible,
and that more money should be
spent now to get ready.
Alert Possible
Twining contended the impor-
tant thing is to be capable of
mounting such an alert, if and
when a need arises. "What's in the
budget will take care of that," he
said.
And the onetime Air Force
chief brus'hed aside as exaggerated
a claim by Gen. Lyman Lemnitzer,
the Army's chief of staff, that
United States capability to airlift

GEN. NATHAN TWINING
. . .opposes Navy plan

(In Bonn, a West German for-
e i g n off ice spokesman said
Khrushchev blasts "show a no-
ticeable toughening of Soviet poli-
cy." Spokesmen for Chancellor
Konrad A d e n a u e r's Christian
Democratic party said Khrush-
chev's latest statements were "not
calculated to strengthen faith in
the sincerity and good will of the
Soviet Union." An opposition So-
cialist leader, Karl Mommer, took
issue with Khrushchev's Insist-
ence that Germany's present bor
ders could be changed only-by war.
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troops and equipment to deal with
any limited war is woefully in-
adequate.
However, the Joint Chiefs lead-
er indicated he did not favor the
drastic cutback in the program to
produce the B70 bomber, a 2,000-
mile-an-hour plane intended to
replace the slower B52 bomber now
making up this country's long
range striking arm.
Defends Eisenhower
In rejecting pet projects of some
of his close associates, Twining
put up a stout defense of Eisen-
hower's 41-billion-dollar defense
budget.
He voiced the conviction that
no nation could attack the United
States now or in time to come
"without receiving unacceptable
damage."

V.

(I

CHESTER ROBERTS
always has the funniesti
VALENTINES . . .
Two locations, too!
312 S. State St.-1203 S. University
Hallmark -Contemporary

Mt+
Second Front Page
Wednesday, February 10, 1960 Page 3
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