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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 10, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY,

Indian Student Discusses
Problems of Lvng i U.S.
(Continued from Page 1)

-

Evaluating the American edu-
cational system, he criticized the
many quizzes and emphasis on
daily assignments as "childish."
He explained that students in
India are given more independ-
ence and work more on their own
initiative. The Indian professor
tries to give the student more of
his knowledge, while the Ameri-
can professor tries to find out
what the student knows.
"We feel we are being treated
like schoolboys," the graduate en-
gineer commented. But he added
that the system is good if one ac-
cepts its basic premise that man is
irresponsible.
Financial Problems
Asked if Indian students faced
any specific financial problems at
the University, he said that many
of his friends requested help
from the authorities, but it was
usually a hoax.
Most of the students who come
here are relatively prosperous and
have sufficient resources and
scholarships to pay for their ex-
penses. The University also re-
quires that all foreign students
prove they have $2600 - the
amount required to meet expenses
for four years.
He explained that many of his
countryment worry because every
American dollar they spend here
is equal to approximately 4-8 In-
dian rupees. Many students spend
more than 1000 rupees per month
while here-a sum larger than
their possible salary at home.
Finds Students Shy
As for social acceptance, he
said that Indians find most
American students friendly but
very shy.

He noted that American girls
are usually more sociable than
boys and said that families were
always very receptive, even though
contemporary students are some-
times timid.
"Many Indian boys are very
keen on dating American girls,"
he noted with a smile. However,
he continued to explain that he
did not indulge because of his
financial situation. Since most
American girls ultimately want
marriage, he notices they were
'very careful" in their social re-
lationships with foreign students.
Dating Difficult
Explaining that Indian girls do
not date American men as a rule.
he said they are very shy, so
much so that they may not even
greet an Indian man on the street.
Although he believes that inter-
marriage may lead to complica-
tions due to basic differences in
culture, he approves of casual so-
cial dating. He advises "very ser-
ious consideration before the re-
lationship goes too far."
He reported that there is very
little opportunity for Indian stu-
dents to worship at the Univer-
sity, but that most students are
not interested in practicing their
religion here anyway.
Adding that he missed his reli-
gious life and other Indian cus-
toms, he noted that many of his
fellow Indians adapt too much to
the American way of life and
abandon their own culture en-
tirely.
He believes that a mutual ex-
change of customs would be much
better for both sides.
"Maybe we have something
good to give to Americans," he
noted with a smile.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

p3

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing. before 2 p.m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1960
VOL. LXX, NO. 94
General Notices
M artha Cook Building is receiving ap-
plications for Sept. 1960. Present Fresh-
men and Sophomore women may apply.
Please telephone NO 2-3225 weekdays be-
tween 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. for ap-
pointmen t.
The Lucy E. Elliott Fellowship with
a stipend of $750 is being offered by the
Alumnae Council of the Alumni Asso-
ciation for 1960-61. It is open to women
graduates of an accredited college or
university. It may be used by a Uni-
versity of Michigan graduate at any
college or university, but a graduate of
any other university will be required
to use the award on the Michigan
campus. Personality, achievement, and
leadership will be considered in grant-
ing the award. Applications may be
made through the Alumnae Council
Office, Michigan League, and must be
filed by March 15, 1960. Award will be
announced April 11, 1960.
The Laurel Harper Seeley Scholarship
is announced by the Alumnae Council
of the Alumni Association for 1960-61.
The award is usually $200 and is open
to both graduate and undergraduate
women. The award is made on the basis
of scholarship, contribution to Univer-
ity life and financial need. Applications
may be made through, the Alumnae
Council Office, Michigan League, and
nust be filed by March 15, 1960. Award
will be announced April 11, 1960.
The Mary Louisa Hinsdale Scholarship
amounting to approximately $146.12 (in-
terest on the endowment fund) is avail-
able to undergraduate single women
who are wholly or partially self-sup-
porting and who do not live in Uni-
versity residence halls or sorority houses,
Girls with better than average scholar-
ship and need will be considered. Ap-
plHation blanks are obtainable at the
Alumnae Council Office, Michigan
League, and should be filed by March
15, 1960. Award will be granted for use
during the first semester of 1960-61, and
will be announced April 11, 1960.
Delta Delta Delta National Fund
Scholarship. Eligibility: any woman stu-
dentof better than average academic
standing; evidence of participation in
activities; evidence of genuine need.
Apply to the Office of the Dean of Wom-
en Feb. 9 through Feb. 16.
Captain Reginald G. Sauls IV, Marine
Corps officer selection officer for the

state of Michigan, announced today
that he would visit the University of
Michigan, on the 8th thru the 12th
-of February. While at the University of
Michigan, he plans to interview those
students interested in obtaining a
Marine Corps commission. At present,
vacancies exist for both ground and
aviation training. Captain Sauls stated
that several excellent programs are
offered by the Marine Corps. The pla-
toon leaders class program is available
for freshmen, sophomores and juniors,
while seniors may participate in the
aviation officer candidate course or the
officer candidate course. Marine officer
training is arranged so as not to inter-
fere with your college work, and all
students are required to receive their
degree before being assigned to active
duty. While at the University of Michi-
gan, Captain Sauls and the members
of his team will be located at the Michi-
gan Union daily from 9:00 atm., until
4:00 p.m. All interested students may
contact him there.
Ushers are urgently needed for the
Burton Holmes Travel Movies, which
are to be shown in Hill Aud. on five
successive Thurs. nights, starting with
Thurs., Feb. 18.
Interested persons may apply at the
Box Office of Hill Aud., between 5 p.m.
and 6 p.m. on Tues., Feb. 9, and Wed.,
Feb. 10.
Also, at this time, applications for a
very limited number of ushering posi-
tions for the balance of the Choral
Union and Extra Series Concerts and
for the Lecture Series season, will be
accepted. These are to 11111 vacancies
caused by graduation etc.
All of these positions are open to any
student or staff member, academic or
non-academic.
University of Michigan Graduate
Screening Examinations in French and
German: All graduate students desir-
ing to fulfill their foreign language re-
quirement by passing the written ex-
amination given by Professor Lewis (for
merly given by Professor Hootkins)
must first pass an objective screening
examination. The objective examina-
tions will be given four times each se-
mester (i.e., Sept., Oct., Nov., Dec., Feb.,
March, April, and May) and once during
the Summer Session, in July. Students
who fail the objective examination may
repeat It but not at consecutive ad-
ministrations of the test (e.g., Sept.
and Oct.) except when the two ad-
ministrations are separated by more
than 35 days. (e.g., Dec. and Feb.)
"The next administration of the ob-
jective examinations in French and
German will be on Tues., Feb. 16 in
Aud. C, Angell Hall at 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
Within 48 hours after the examinations
the names of students who have passed
will be posted on the bulletin board
outside the office of Prof. Lewis, the
Examiner in Foreign Languages, Rm.
3028 Rackham Bldg.
"Students desiring to fulfill the
Graduate School's requirement in
French and German are alerted to an
alternate path. A grade of B or better
(Continued on Page 4)

New Boo
Discusses
Law, Atom
(Continued from Page 1)
presented to the Legislature last
year and will go before the legis-
lators again this session.
One of the most difficult prob-
lems the lawyers tackled is proof
of causation in cases of atomic in-
jury. If present theories of proof
are applied they will yield re-
sults "remarkably close- to those
obtained in a lottery," they say.
Solution Presented
The solution-The "contingent
injury fund" into which the in.r
jured person would pay according
to the probability of developing
a disabling injury in the future,
and according to probable cost of
the injury, if it develops. He could
collect only when the injury has
developed.
There are some radiation in-
juries which present statutes do
not cover at all.
Complete rethinking is needed
on wrongful death and survival
laws, Dean Stason and Prof. Es-
tep and Prof. Pierce believe. These
laws concern the right of an es-
tate, relatives and dependents to
recover damages for injuries
which result in another individu-
al's death.
Pre-Natal Coverage Sought
Further, adequate coverage must
be found for pre-natal injuries,
increased susceptibility to disease
and shortened life span occurring
from radiation.
The lawyers note the United
States has moved toward a doc-
trine of "strict liability" for ra-
diation linjuries, meaning no mat-
ter how reasonably and cautious-
ly an individual or organization
may act, he may still be held
liable to damages to another per-
son.
"Exceptions must be worked out
to achieve justice and avoid dis-
couraging the development of a
new and valuable technology," the
authors say.
They will continue working on
such loopholes, Prof. Estep indi-
cates. "Atoms and the Law" mere-
ly summarizes the first phase of
the law school study.
Astronomer
To Lecture
Opening a series of lectures on
the philosophy of science, Her-
mann Zanstra, visiting professor
of astronomy from the University
of Amsterdam will speak at 4 p.m.
today on "The Contribution of
Physics to Modern Thought."
The talk will be held in 33 Angell
Hall, and succeeding lectures on
the general topic, "The Construc-
tion of Reality," will be given at
the same time and place each
Wednesday. Prof. Zanstra is lec-
turing under auspices of the phi-
losophy department.
CFM Seeks
U' Students
A meeting for University stu-
dents interested in joining Citizens
for Michigan will be held at 4:30
p.m. today in Rm. 3456 of the
Student Activities Bldg.
Nancy Adams, '60, regional CFM
committee member, said the meet-
ing is open to all interested stu-
dents. However, only Michigan
residents may join the organiza-
tion

Clothing Store
Plans Opening
Saks Fifth Avenue will open a
men's ready-to-wear store in Ann
Arbor by September.
The announcement was made by
Edward T. Bedford of Detroit,
manager of the Saks' Detroit
branch. The store will be located
at 322 S. State St., formerly occu-
pied by Mary Lee Candies.
The local store "will follow,
somewhat, the Ivy League pat-
tern."
Bedford said there are no pres-
ent plans for adding women's and
children's departments to the local
store.

A new establishment, called "The
Promethean," which will feature a
Bohemian-type atmosphere, will be
opened this spring at 508 E. Liberty
St. in a store that has been com-
pletely remodeled.
Co-owners of the new coffee
shop are Robert Marshall, owner
of Marshall's Book Shop, and
Morris Richman, owner of the
Bud-Mor Agency, which represents
dance bands and entertainers.
The two said "The Promethean"
Will specialize in serving 20 kinds
of Italian, Turkish and American
coffee, Italian pastries and "un-
usual" sandwiches in "an artistic,
Bohemian atmosphere."
Paintings by Ann Arbor artists
will be displayed in a dark gray
interior with "deliberately mis-
matched" furnishings.
SUMMER JOBS
in
EUROPE
3000 Positions open
in all fields
WRITE TO:
AMERICAN STUDENT
INFORMATION SERVICE, e. V.
JAHNSTRASSE 56 a
FRANKFURT/MAIN, GERMANY

H UGH SCOTT AGENCY
1332 Geddes NO 5x5700
Phone NO 2-4786
for Michigan DaIly
Classified Ads

NEXT WEEK!

"A STREETCAR
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

The co-owners said they h
the 1,500-square-foot installat
will create a friendly, informal
mosphere-"a place where pers
can relax."
SDANCE
ORCH ESTRAS
featuring
THE DIXIE-CATS
HUGH SCOTT
MAC DAN FORT H
BOB JAMES
DICK CORRELL
BILL HENLINE
ARTI E EDWARDS
KAY MIESEN
PHIL STANLEY
plus many more

I,

I

Ending Today

DIAL NO 2-6264
KOOKIEST MURDER MOMI EVER!I
GLEN1,' DEBBIE
FORD REYnOwS
N WEGAZE BO'
} CARL REINER
w JOHN McGIVER
inCEMASCOPE

-

J;

Announcing:
TRYOUT MEETING
Business Staff

NEAR CAMPUS:
New Bohemian Establishme
To Feature Coffee, Paintin

to

.,.

Friday -415

a

Why not a red apple
for your Valentine?
Linen by Vera.
JOHN LEIDY
,hone NO 8-6779 * 601 East Liberty
( ||||||||||||||3 ||||||||||||||| ||||411|

United States Steel Research Center
MONROEVILLE, PA.
has outstanding opportumities
for graduates in
ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL, AND CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING
METALLURGY, CHEMISTRY, AND MATHEMATICS
to undertake research and
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areas of
AUTOMATION
ORE REDUCTION
ALLOY DEVELOPMENT

COMING - FRIDAY, 8:30 P.M.
Britain's Brilliant Commedienne
JOYCE GRENFELL,
"Witty, winning and altogether wonderful" . . . N.Y. Herald Tribune
"One of the most gifted performers in the world today"
N.Y. Journal American
"AN EVENING WITH JOYCE GRENFELL"
Hilarious One-Woman Show of Humorous Monologues

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