100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 17, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,..

South

Africa

Agei

icy Sets
Boycott

HOFFA CHALLENGES JUDGE:
Leader Asks Disqualificatioi

Warning

Against

Undergr ou
Negroes Ask
Work Cease
Government Ignores
Effect on Economy
JOHANNESBURG (W)-Negroes
were warned by the government
yesterday they may be banished
to backwoods reserves if they obey
the underground call for a work
boycott next week.
The department of Bantu (na-
tive) Administration and Devel-
opment issued the warning in a
statement that ignored the ques-
tion of how the South African,
economy could operate if the huge
Negro labor force refuses to work.
Against the background of a
report Tuesday by Justice Min-
ister Francois Erasmus that auth-
orities already are "shipping many
idle and superfluous Bantu back
to their homelands," it said:
"The Bantu public are reminded
that a considerable number of
Bantu workers were dismissed
from their employment as a result
of the recent stay - away - from -
work campaign and have since
been unemployed. TUnless they find
work soon they will have to go
back to their homelands.
"Bantu workers are therefore,
in their own interests, warned not
to pay any attention to pamphlets
or other forms of encouragement
for them to stay away from work."
The outlawed African National!
Congress, is promoting the work
bpycott.. It wants to revive the
stay - at - home movement broken
last week after police raids on
African settlements netted sacks
of arms and hundreds of men de-
scribed by authorities as subver-
sives, agitators and terrorists.
With most of its known leaders'
in jail, the Congress' Emergency
Committee called for Negroes to
stay at home throughout next'
week to enforce four demands on
Prime Minister Hendrik F. Ver-'
woerd's white supremacy regime.

ARTS AND LETTERS:
Gillis Ijiscussesss American Opera

By STEPHANIE ROUMELL
Samual Hopkinson, who signed
The Declaration of Independence,
wrote the first American opera,
Donald Gillis, vice-president of
National Music Camp at Inter-
lochen said recently.
"Most of it is lost now. But since
then there have been thousands of
operas written here in the United
States - this doesn't necessarily
make them American."
Rather an "American" opera is
based on the presumption that a
composer (whether he was born
in the United States or not) has
lived and worked in this country
and has used materials indigenous
to or typical of this nation's cul-
ture," Gillis explained.
Hard to Pinpoint
"Actually it is hard to pin-
point American opera by a rigid
set of rules," Gillis said. "But one
can tell by listening if an opera
is in the American tradition as
opposed to the Italian, French or
Russian."
"'Porgy and Bess' contains a lot
of the essence of jazz. It is easy to

see that it was written here; it
has the United States label. There
may be some technical errors in
it, but none the less it provides a
terriffic evening of theatre and
music."
"When a good story is combined
with good music, it is pretty like-
ly that it will be a good opera,"
Gillis said.
Need All Ingredients
Good opera is many things, he
added, "not just good acting, sing-
ing, staging, or a good libretto.
It is a combination. Like making
a cake, you must have all the
ingredients right."
"You must also have one to con-
sume it in the end, one who finds
the total effect palatable. But
most Americans don't like opera,"
he added, "mostly because they
don't know much about it-a kind
of inverse snobbism."
Gillis' interest in opera came
about as a composer. "I was look-
ing for other things to write," he
said. "I wrote a few that I im-
mediately squelched, but now I
have four worth keeping."

His hobby is American music in
general and American opera as
opposed to operas of other na-
tions. "I tire of continual opera-
going-to traditional opera, that
is. I've seen them all and if I had
a choice, I'd rather see American
opera."
"This will mark me as a low
brow, but it is something musi-
cians usually don't admit."
American opera composers tend
to write shorter works with sim-
pler techniques involved than do
the old school opera writers, Gillis
noted, because these operas are
usually produced in schools and
community work shops.
750 Opera Houses
There are 750 places in America
where opera can be given, he
added. Most of these are small
production centers which can't
give full-scale opera. So shorter
operas are presented, often of
one act, and smaller casts are
used.
In this country the place where
the most interest is being shown
in opera is in public schools and
colleges, Gillis noted. Educational
centers present opera frequently.
On the professional level New
York City Center is the most ac-
tive American opera production
place in the country, he added.
"The Met doesn't symbolize an
American opera place today, al-
though it undoubtedly will some
day."
Produce 21 Operas
One of the phases of develop-
ment at the National Music Camp
has been American opera, Gillis
pointed out. Last year 21 operas-
all American - were produced
there.
"In America today there is fan-
tastic swirl of creation in opera
writing out of which will come a
few master pieces and many good
works."
"Opera is an exciting new field
of musical development -in this
country for both the composer
and the producer-it just needs
time to happen."

Castro Still
Chases Foe
In Oriente
Sees Gravest Political
Headache as Leader
HAVANA (MP-Opposition from
inside and outside Cuba appeared
yesterday to be giving Prime Min-
ister Fidel Castro his gravest
political headache since he came
to power in January of 1959.
While most Cubans enjoyed a
three - day Easter holiday at
beaches or at home, advices from
Eastern Cuba said Castro is trudg-
ing muddy Oriente Province in
pursuit of a guerrilla band.
The band of about 50 men is
led by Manuel Beaton, a former
captain in Castro's revolutionary
army. He escaped from Havana
military prison and took to the
mountains of Eastern Cuba where
Castro launched his own rebellion.
The pro-Castro newspaper La
Calle said a band of youths who
hoped to join Beaton tried to raid
a police post in Havana's suburbs
to obtain arms but were beaten
off. Four youths were reported
arrested.
Castro's military agents were
reported pressing a sweeping
roundup of persons suspected of
cooperating with the anti-Castro
movements. Military intelligence
says these movements are being
directed from abroad.
The implication is that the
anti-Castro forces are getting
help from such areas as Florida,
where there are many Cuban
exiles.
Cuban officials declined to com-
ment either on the progress of
the roundup or the pursuit of
Beaton. There was no indication
of the number under arrest.
While there is a news blackout
on the operations against Beaton,
the average Cuban in Havana
seemed to be well informed on the
situation. Pro-Castro Cubans were
taking a grave view of events in
Oriente province.

WASHINGTON (M) - Teamsters
Union President James R. Hoffa
yesterday filed a court request
asking United States District
Judge F. Dickinson Letts to dis-
qualify himself from presiding
over further Teamster legal mat-
ters..
He accused the judge of bias
and prejudice.
There was no immediate com-
ment from Letts, who has pressed
a cleanup drive against the union.
The judge will be 85 on April 26,
the eve of Hoffa's scheduled ouster
trial on charges of misusing union
funds in a Florida real estate ven-
ture.
Letts now is on a - Caribbean
cruise.
It will be up to the judge to de-
cide whether to disqualify him-
self under the infrequently used
"affidavit of disqualification" filed
in district court here yesterday by

an attorney for Hoffa, H. Clifford
Allder.
It Letts refuses to do so, Allder
said, there is no appeal and the
ouster trial will go ahead. But
Allder said that if an appeal is
made later from the final trial
ruling, an issue could be made be-
fore the appeals court if Letts re-
fuses yesterday's disqualification
request.
The Hoffa affidavit said Letts

has a personal prejudice and bias
against the union president and is
biased in favor of Chief Teamster
Monitor Martin F. O'Donoghue
and Godfrey P. Schnidt, aformer
monitor.
Schmidt, a New York attorney,
filed suit 21/2 years ago in behalf
of rank-and-file Teamsters mem-
bers asking that Hoffa be barred
from the union presidency.

7t[l s . irl i an ailg

Second Front Page
Sunday, April 17,1960

Page(

Y hunq i
qraceftuf

I

I

food /oo4

I

feorn

I'

De Gaulle To Make New Bid
For Bigger French Voice

WASHINGTON (W) - FrenchY
President Charles de Gaulle is
due to make a new bid to Presi-
dent Dwight D. Eisenhower next
week for a greater voice for France
in Allied decisions on grand strat-
egy the world over.
De Gaulle and Eisenhower will
begin a series of high policy talks
within hours after the French
Chief of State arrives here Friday
afternoon. The talks will continue
through Monday. On Tuesday de
Gaulle will leave for New York
and a swing around the country.
The lanky, 69-year-old general's

Fi

{

|Ii

J EWE LERWY
for your
Spring Wardrobe

state visit affords one more oppor-
tunity for the Western allies to
bridge over some of the grave
differences which divide them in
advance of the summit conference
with Soviet Premier Nikita Khru-
shchev at Paris May 16.
Summit prospects are scheduled
to dominate the Eisenhower - de
Gaulle sessions, diplomats said.
But it is in this connection, they
conceded, that divisions,, within
the Western alliance now have
their most important and danger-
ous meaning.
One of these divisions Is the
role that France should play. Eis-
enhower and British Prime Min-
ister Harold MacMillan have re-
peatedly discouraged an effort
started by de Gaulle last December
to form a kind of United States-
British-French directorate to run
NATO. United States officials un-
derstand de Gaulle has stopped
pressing for any formal arrange-
ment of that kind.
But French diplomats report
that de Gaulle is vitally interested
in two aspects of allied policy
control: he wants assurance that
France would be consulted by the
United States and Britain prior
to the use of nuclear weapons
anywhere in the world, and he
wants a direct French role in
planning strategic air force oper-
ations.
Half a dozen Western foreign
mi n i s t e r s reached substantial,
agreement here last week on the
opening positions Eisenhower, de
Gaulle and MacMillan should.
take on Berlin and on disarma-
ment - the critical issues - when
they meet Khrushchev at the
summit.

B N TDAGE GFTS

T

STUDENT - YOUNG TEACHER
EUROPEAN TOUR

307 SOUTH STATE STALL.T
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

._

YOU'LL ENJOY THESE UNIQUE EVENTS:
" Live several days in the home of a French family
. Talk with leading government personalities
* Attend cultural events that characterize Europe
" Meet students from all over the world
" Thrill to variety of special evening enterfalnmenft
" Visit renowned studios, industries and art centers
" Edinburgh Festival, Shakespeare Memorial Theatre, Obetammergau

=Nm ::il li'

I

COUNTRIES675
TOUR PRICE INCLUDES
3 meals daily everywhere; all transportation in Europe by de liss. es.
conditioned motor coach; special receptions throughout tour...

4
!
i
U
i
io

./*.
., ,
.=a
1
.+' / i
ia/ /
A.
f
i
yi
7
aM i
y."
:r
"X. .X N{lk * '
" T^fi
t' ;s
yr"
4^
a

v)
r f ~
. . I

I

I

I

,ult '

U

I

I

I

I

KIII

.*

/
t6

O....
Rowid teip fransalantkc
tansportation available at
550 Ffth ven additional cost. Crl .5
TRAVEL & CULTURAL EXCHANGE, INC.
550 FIfEh AvensoErtU York- i f6, N.lY. Cire nl5OU4

sE a , rt rr r :i wila m SIN

Delightful
$teSrisdottedBtie
by
t rick-rack
trimmed with
mushroom pleating
on the
caiflisole bodice.
red or blue,
small, medium or
large
t_ .A~f

fhe Calend
ul illh
pit9 en
Fashion plus-wh
dress or dress wil
preciate the fashi
comes from that'
look.
Perfect for a do
May Festival witl
late day and eveni
See our selectio
tumes, prints and
29.95 of rayon an
and cottons from 1
r'

aLd C0'4tume
ng esver'y
9agemten t
ether it's a jacket-
th coat-you'll ap-
on confidence that
"Well put together
y in town. Travel-
Fout coat for into
ing.
ns of pure silk cos-
solid colors-from
id acetate blends-
7.95.

! p.
:' };
. f
r r: <<:
+Y

w.
Ssilk tin-

I

I

A whirl of white showered with
feminine embroidered red and
pink roses .............39.95
Sophisticated symphony in black
.. . lush pure silk, net filled over-
skirt finished off with yellow

I

II

£

vro rncti imra c

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan