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April 09, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY APRIL 8. 1960

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRrnAV APRIT. n io~e

aaraa cai raa iVii1 O, 1.7V V

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-Daily-James Warneka
DOUBLE BILL-Two one-act plays by the Dramatics Art Center
will be staged today, tomorrow and Sunday at Lane Hall. The
offerings will be "The New Tenant," a play by Eugene Ionesco,
and "The Proposal," a comedy by Anton Chekhov.
Dramatic Arts To Present
One-Act Play Double Bill

Area Fair
To Reward
Entrants
Prizes and prestige await the
winners in the Southeastern
Michigan Science Fair which
opens today at Yost Fieldhouse.
Junior and senior high school
students from Hillsdale, Jackson,
Monroe, Lenawee and Washte-
naw counties will display theirI
scientific projects, competing for
trips to the National Science Fair
in Indianapolis May 11-14. {
Entry cards from 167 students
have been received, the University
Bureau of School Services, coordi-
nating agency for the fair, has
announced. Last year 156 exhibits
were prepared.
The fair will be open to visitors
during tomorrow afternoon and
evening and Sunday afternoon.
Judging of displays started last
night and will continue through
this morning.
Give Prizes
Prizes valued at more than $800
will be awarded to top finishers in
the various divisions.
The leading boy and girl scien-
tists in the senior high division
will receive the trips to the In-
dianapolis conference, plus $25
each and a medal.
The next seven contestants will
receive cash awards with the top
three place winners in the senior
division's six scientific categories
receiving medals.
Special prizes include a "Navy
Science Cruiser Award" to go to
a 10th or 11th grade male student.
It is a five-day, expenses-paid
tour of naval scientific facilities
next fall.
Chicago Trip
In addition, a trip will be given
to the National Youth Conference
on the atom in Chicago for an
11th grade student in the engi-
neering, physics or mathematics
divisions.
Junior division winners will re-
ceive cash awards and medals.
,The fair, sponsored by the Ex-
change Club, "The Ann 'Arbor
News" and the University, ex-
pects to host more than the 7,500
spectators who viewed the show
last year. This is due to the inclu-
sion of two other counties in the
contest.
Avery Downer, president of Ann
Arbor Exchange Club, reports
that the club has collected more
than $1,000 from local industry
and businesses to finance the fair.
The club hopes to exceed last
year's total of $3,300, Downer
said, but the drive got off to a
late start this year.

By LORA KRAPOHL
"Ionesco makes furniture speak
eloquently and in 'The New.Ten-
ent' pieces of furniture form a
perfect and terrifying symbol of
the encroachment of material
possessions on the human condi-
tion."
This observation was made by
B. P. Moonyean, director of the
double bill which will be presented
by the Dramatics Art Center at
Senior Society
Taps Women
Singing "In and out the halls
we wander," Senior Society, senior
independent women's honorary,
last night tapped 23 juniors and
first semester seniors for member-
ship,
Honored for leadership, scholar-
ship and activities were Ann Barz-
ler, '61; . . Mar-
jory Clark, '60; Patricia Clark,
'61; Jill Clarridge, '61; Joan Comi-
ano, '61; Gail Doherty, '60; Myra
Goines, '61; Ellen Gustafson,
'61SM; and Edith Hartman,
'61NR.
Also chosen were Margaret Ho-
shel, '61; Ann Kynast, '61SM;
Rosalie Marie Lonergan, '61; Mar-
lene Menzel, '60; Ronnie Posner,
'61; Emmagene Reisig, '61; Carol,
Schneider, '61Ed.; Mary Spiess,
'60N; Mary Lu Thacher, '60; Val-
Joan Urban, '61; Ardith Watts,
'60SM; Jean Weber, '60; and
Sandy Wilson, '61.

8:30 p.m. today and tomorrow and,
8 p.m. Sunday in Lane Hall.
The bill Is composed of two, one-
act plays: Eugene Ionesco's "The
New Tenant" and Anton Chek-
hov's "The Proposal."
"honesco's plays deal with the
unreality of our 'real' world.
"He usually starts by showing
us familiar characters in a famil-
iar world and then lets the un-
familiar erupt through the picture
until it disintegrates and we are
faced with an illogical world,
which has an alarming and un-
familiar logic all its own," Moon-
yean said.
"He does this in a supremely
theatrical fashion which may
challenge rather than entertain,
irritate rather than satisfy. Ion-
esco has been called the poet of
double-talk. He can probably be
thought of as anything from a
dealer in gimmicks to a theatrical
genius."
"The Chekhov play, 'The Pro-
posal' is a one act comedy. It is
about Lomov, a hypochondriac,
trying to work up enough courage
to propose to Natalia, the daugh-
ter of a neighbor," Moonyean said.
The father, it turns out, wants
his daughter to get married, and
the daughter wants to get mar-
ried. But each time Lomov is
about to propose, he and Natalya
start to argue such things as
whose meadow or whose dog is
best.
The Dramatic Art Center is
composed- of a combination of
University students and non-stu-
dents.

l ca hn ~e J'oume
I.

Tonight the social calendar be-
longs to five sororities holding
their pledge formals.
The women of Delta Gamma'
and their dates will have dinner
at the Gondola and then return to
the house for a dance with a
Hawaiian theme, featuring the
music of Andy Anderson,
* * *
Johnny Herberd and his or-
chestra will provide the music for
Alpha Phi's pledge formal to be
held at the house from 9-12 fol-
lowing dinner at Webber's.
* * *
Kappa Alpha Theta will have a
dinner at Arbor Lil's followed by
a "Showers of Flowers" dance at
the house. Decorations will be
flowers and umbrellas and the
Kingsmen will play for the occa-
sion.
The Boll Weevils will play in
the League Ballroom where Sigma
Kappa members and their dates
will have dinner followed by a
formal from 8-12.
Alpha Chi Omega girls will dine
with their escorts at the Farm
Cupboard and then return to the
house where they will dance to the
music of Dick Tilkin from 9-12.
Saturday night the fraternities
take over. Phi Gamma Delta mem-
bers and their dates will have din-
ner at the Huron Hotel, after
which they will attend the Victor
Borge concert and return to the
house for the pledge formal, where
music will be provided by the Ray
Louis Orchestra.
Chi Phi's pledge formal will be
a Playboy dance preceded by din-
ner at the house. Decorations for
the dance have been specially or-
dered from Playboy Magazine and
music will be provided by Johnny
Harberd.
* * *
Phi Sigma Kappa will hold its
pledge formal on a South Sea is-
land, "Beneath the Southern
Cross," after a dinner at the house.
Al Blaser will play South Sea mu-
sic for the occasion.
* * *
Delta Chi's pledge formal will
be held at the Washtenaw Coun-
try Club featuring dinner and
dancing to the music of Bob El-
liott.
Theta Xi's spring formal will
have a Parisian flavor accented by
a modern Left Bank art exhibit
and Andy Anderson's band ser-

enading on a terrace to make the
gay street scene complete.
* * *
The Boll Weevils will enliven
Sigma Alpha Epsilon's Rock 'n'
Roll party Saturday night. The
dance is planned so as to remind
guests of their American Band-
stand days, and a swinging time
should be had by all.
Don Shetler will play at the
Zeta Psi house as the men dance
with their dates "In a French
Cafe."
* 9 *
The Iranian Students Club will
celebrate Nu-Rouz, the New Year's,
festival, with a dance in the Un-
ion Ballroom from 9-12 Saturday.
The Men of Note will provide
the music for a dance at Michi-
gan House in West Quad Satur-
'day night.
Alpha Kappa Lambda's pajama
party will feature a huge bed and
a "soporific atmosphere" induced
by Marty Centala and his 33'/3 All
Stars, The girls will receive paja-
mas as favors.

WUOM Sets
Seven New
Programs
Seven new radio programs will
be introduced over University
broadcasting station W UJM this
month.
Dr. C. S. Lewis from the Univer-
sity of Cambridge will be featured
in a new series of short talks on
"Love." This program may be
heard at 1:30 p.m. Sundays.
Sacred music may be heard on
-"David Randolph Conducts," a
new program at 7:30 p.m. Fridays.
Prof. Warren Bower returns to
WUOM upon popular request with
a series of programs featuring in-
terviews with authors of current
novels at 7 p.m.
A new series of "Greek Drama"
will be initiated at 1:30 p.m. Sun-
day. A live production of "Ores-
tes" will be featured on April 24.
A United Nations show, "The
World of 1960," will become a reg-
ular on the WUOM schedule at
4:15 p.m. Wednesdays. Joseph P.
Lyford will be host on this pro-
gram as well as "The American Re-
public" which may be heard at
7:30 p.m. Wednesdays.
The seventh program to make
its debut on WUOM during April
is "Poets at Mid-Century."

Robert Coleman, N.Y. Daily Mirror, says,. .

"A GREAT MUSICAL. LEFT
FIRST NIGHT AUDIENCE
APPLAUDING AND HOARSE
I NG."

A BRILLIANT
LIMP FROM
FROM CHEER-

WONDERFUL TOWN
Coming Next Week!

11

MICHIGAN FORENSIC GUILD
Presents
HARVARD AND MICHIGAN DEBATERS
Speaking on
T H E LOYALTY O ATH

7:30 P.M.
Rackham Amphitheatre

Friday, April 8
Public Invited

III

ACROSS CAMPUS:
Nobel Prize Winner KornbergI
To Lecture on Nucleic Acids

ENDING SATURDAY
"'BRILLIANT...
one of the cinema's outstanding
masterpieces." -Time Magazine
"A FILM OF RARE DISTINCTION . . . Pictori-.
.ally lovely in every way ... Subtle and
revealing observation .'.. Like the mem
orable.films of Robert Flaherty."
-Bosley Cbowther, N. Y, Timesu
"REMARKABLE perception, penetratiofl
sensitivity and understuiding. The film
medium brought to its finest pitch of
expression." -Winsten, N.Y. Post
"Extraordinary!
A picture no i
serious movie-
goer will want The
-8.ddey, Her,-Tnrb.

J

SABBATH SERVICES
at the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
TONIGHT
FRIDAY, APRIL 8 AT 7:15 P.M.
in the Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel
Sponsored by the Phi Sigma Sigma Sorority

Prof. Arthur Kornberg of Stan-
ford University, 1959 Nobel Prize
winner in Medicine and Physi-
ology, will lecture here today un-,
der the sponsorship of the Insti-
tute of Science and Technology.
His talk on "Tile Replication of
Nucleic Acids in vitro," scheduled
at 4 p.m. in the third level amphi-
theatre of the Medical Science
Bldg., will be one of a series on
"Molecular Control of Cellular
Activity."
Prof. Kornberg shares the No-'
bel Prize with Prof. Severo Ochoa,
chairman of the biochemistry de-
partment of the New York Uni-
versity medical school.
The University Men's Glee Club
will appear in a "Three for To-
night" concert with the glee clubs
of Wayne State' University and
Michigan State University at 8:30
p.m. today in Detroit's Ford Audi-
torium.
Tickets are available at MSU,
Ford Auditorium, and Grinnell's
on Woodward Ave.
Petitioning opens today for the
1960 male chairman of Home-
coming. The petitions are due
Thursday, April 14, at 5 p.m. In-
terviews will be held Saturday
morning, April 16.
Petition forms are available at
the Student Offices of the Michi-
gan Union.

of the school this visit. Herbert B.
Huffman, Grad., will also be sent
as a fellow.
Prof. Graber will leave in July
with his wife and two children.
He will first visit Moscow for the
twenty-sixth International con-
gress of Orientalists, which meets
once every three years.
"The Congress gives a chance to
meet colleagues from other lands
who we know only through their
writings."
At the annual meeting of the
Washtenaw Student Nurses Asso-
ciation last night, the officers for
next year were elected.
Sharon Mail, '61N, will be pres-
ident; Joan Carley, '62N, first
vice-president; Sharon Sheets,
'62N, second vice-president; Shei-
la Ronta, '61N, recording secre-
tary; Abagail Sheren, '61N,
corresponding secretary; Audrey
Schmidt, '62N, treasurer.

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While on a one year leave, Prof.
Oleg Graber of the history of art
department will try to determine
when the western part of the
Syrian Desert stopped being culti-
vated.
Prof. Graber will be one of four
scholars sent for a year to the
American School of Oriental Re-
search in Jerusalem-Jordan.
He was sent as a fellow seven
years ago and will be the director

EUROPE
We'll see the usual PLUS.
You're not herded around.
A college tour that's different
EUROPE SUMMER TOURS
225 Sequoia, Box 2 Pasadena, Calif.
IN PERSON
SUSAN REED
Folk Singer
Saturday, April 23
8:30 P.M.
Detroit Institute of Arts
Tickets Available at
The DISC Shop
1210 So. University NO 3-6922
OPEN EVENINGS

I

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S.G.C
TONIGHT at 7:00 and 9:00
BERNARD SHAW'S
THE
DOCTOR'S DILEMMA
(Color)
with LESLIE CARON, DIRK BOGARDE
ROBERT MORLEY, FELIX AYLMER
Short: Question in Togoland
Saturday and Sunday4
at 7:00and 9:15
SABATINI'S
CAPTAIN BLOOD

vl

C 'ottilc 3%lm Soctety

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