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April 05, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-04-05

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South African Police

Use Clubs

ri
Against
x Police Deny
Use of Guns
Against Mobsf
Make Try To Force
Resumption of Work
CAPE TOWN (M) - Squads of
police used clubs, whips and gun-
fire yesterday in an effort to drive
rebelliously idling Negroes back to
work and clear the streets of al-
leged troublemakers.
Witnesses said hundreds of Ne-
groes apparently were beaten.
One witness told of police using
sjamboks (whips made of strips
of rubber) on Negroes near Cale-
don Square in the center of the
city. -
Africans Shot
Unofficial reports said 35 per-
sons were wounded by gunfire
when police cordoned off Nyanga LON
East and West townships and1
made a methodical house-to-house
search in some areas for Africans
who had not gone back to work. COLL
Police denied that many were
wounded by gunfire. However, hos-
pitals confirmed that four were 5
wounded by the first gunfire.
The townships are strongholds
of the Pan Africanist Congress. It
organized a work boycott last week TheJ
in protest against police shoot- crimina
ings of demonstrators who defied momen
South Africa's white supremacy last we
laws requiring nonwhites to carry
passbooks. BAT(
Negroes Boycott alumni
Five out of six Negro workers persuad
observed the boycott at its height ren Un
last week, but about 60 per cent The gr
of the labor force returned to work out bec
today. ers say
The police action began in the crossed
morning after the start of regular Thes
work hours.-, Sunday
Some desperate Negroes in the withdr
settlements finally made a stand trickle
on a hill. At this time the police drawal
were reported to have fired on there v
them. By 5 p.m. the police had on han
withdrawn. day
Police Sweep ahe
Negroes phoning from the town- for a S
ships described the scene as po- tell ho
lice, backed by armored cars, wouldr
swept through the settlements. Trou
The witnesses, including a nurse eight o
and a priest, said hundreds were leaders
beaten with whips and clubs. ing the
In Johannesburg Foreign Min- never r
ister Eric Louw charged today. betraye
critics of his government would Led 1
hand over South Africa to a "black dnl
proletariat" to destroy what the dta, ar
pstar a
whites have built. 'the sc
Assail Hypocrisy take di
pLouw assailed as hypocrisy the ,those s
action of the United Nations Se- school
curity Council Friday in urging The
South Africa to abolish its policy strengt
of apartheid or segregation, told th
Speaking to an audience that boycott
included many ambassadors at the The
opening of the Government Pa- dents a
vilion at Johannesburg's Union of the
Exposition, Louw declared: organiz
"The climax in the United Na- capitol,
tions' incitement and interference several
in South Afrif&n affairs was lunch e
reached last week when the Se- Dean
curity Council, in contravention Southe
of its own charter, took it upon ciplina
itself to pass judgment on South "violati
Africa. relating
"One marvels at the blatant conduc
hypocrisy of the many countries Univers
that lodge complaints against
South Africa."I
BOS

Negroes

to

End

Strike
Soviet Says
U.S. 'Uses'
Negotiation
GENEVA () - A Soviet spokes-
man charged yesterday the United
States is trying to use the 10-na-
tion disarmament negotiations to
nullify Moscow's lead in long
range missiles and space vehicles.
Deputy Foreign Minister Vale-
rian Zorin rejected United States
Ambassador Frederick M. Eaton's
proposal for a quick agreement
banning nuclear armed satellites
from outer space. These are re-
garded as the ultimate weapons of
mass destruction, perfection of
which may be only a few years
away.
Zorin told the disarmament con-
ference the Soviet Union will only
enter into arrangements govern-
ing space vehicles if the United
States surrenders its overseas mili-
tary bases. He repeated this later
to newsmen, saying Eaton's clean
space plan "cannot be accepted
since it is one-sided."
He claimed the entire Western
approach to the work of the Con-
ference appears insincere and fails
to provide for the "general and
complete disarmament" called for
in the United Nations Assembly
resolution last autumn.
Zorin's action brought the con-
ference to a standstill at the open-
ing of the fourth week of the
talks.
Western sources said he seems
bent now-with the reference to
United States bases-on trying to
win a propaganda victory. To pre-
vent this, delegations from the
United States, Britain, France,
Italy and Canada are prepared to
sit in Geneva indefinitely and keep
hammering away on the need for
disarmament guaranteed by inter-
national enforcement machinery.
- - - --

CITES 'PROMISE'
ReutherRaps Republicans
WASHINGTON (P-) - AFL-CIO
leader Walter Reuther, who often AFL-CIO aide had read Reuther's tration planned action on
makes Republicans see red, did prepared tstimony to a special viding health benefits for the
it again yesterday by charging that Senate subcommittee considering At the news conference in
President Dwight D. Eisenhower's problems of the aged. tion, on Feb. 3, a reporter
administration backed away from Reuther, president of the United the President "If the admi
a promise to propose government-

-AP Wirephoto
DRONERS PROTEST--This crowd packed London's Trafalgar Square recently in response to a
Labor Party call for a rally in protest of the racial policies of the South African Government.
LEGE ROUNDUP:
tudent A nti-Segregation Continues

By RALPH KAPLAN
national student anti-dis-
ation movement gained bth
turn gnd some organization
ek.
ON ROUGE -- Parents and
groups Sunday tried to
de Negro students at South-
iversity to stay in school.
oup is intending to walk
ause their integration lead-
they had been double-
school kept its offices open
so that students could
aw if they wished. A steady
went through the with-
line, but it appeared that
would be enough students
d to resume classes on Mon-
campus appeared normal
unday, but it was hard to
w many of the students
not return to the school.
ble flared up again when
of the suspended student
stormed on campus, tell-
students to go home and
return, as the school bad
d them.
by the student body presi-
Marvin Robinson, a track
nd Major John, they said
hool had promised not to
sciplinary measures against
students who remained in
leaders said that, on the
h of this promise, they had
ze students to cease their
and' go back to school.
eighteen suspended stu-
were originally ordered out
school as a result of an
ed march on the state
protesting the jailing of
Negroes in Louisiana's first
counter sitdown strike.
Martin L. Harvey of
rn University said the dis-
ry action was taken for
ng university regulations,
to insubordina4ion, and
t unbecoming to Southern
city students."
* * S
TON - The Boston EPIC
ency P u b 1i c Integration
btee) is the first organiza-
fnorthern student action
he demonstrations began.
group will act as coordin-
fanti-discriminatory action
w England colleges. Demon-
ns at Simmons College,

Smith College and Vassar have
highlighted support action in New
England. Other developments in
the region have been a discussion
of the role of the Northern stu-
dent in the demonstration at the
most recent Yale "Challenge"
program and fund-raising cam-
pains at several colleges.
* S *
OBERLIN-The end of formal
fund-raising activities has result-
ed in $2,023 collected by the Ob-
erlin College Fund for Nashville.
This figure excludes proceeds
from three campus benefits and
mail contributions.
* . S
DETROIT-More than 800 stu-
dents at Wayne State University
signed petitions expressing sup-
port for Southern demonstrations,
and commending the restrains of
the Southern students in their
protests.
The Student Faculty Council,
however, has said that picketing
in the Detroit area "must be done
on an individual basis without of-,
ficial support of the S-FC." This
statement came after the S-FC
censored a student group and the
Dean of Students ruled that hand-
bills entitled "Picket Woolworth,",
I ENDS

circulating on the Wayne State
campus, were illegal.
ALBERQUERQUE - University
of New Mexico students have sup-
ported the Southern actions with
a demonstration in front of an
Alberquerque F. W. Woolworth.
store.
The manager of the Alberquer-
que Chamber of Commerce,
speaking as a private citizen, call-
ed the demonstration "inexcus-
able."
The placards read, "We are
picketing Woolworth stores be-
cause they segregate in their
Southern stores. This store does
not segregate but its company
does," Co-existence or no existence
at Woolworth's southern lunch
counters." "We of U.N.M. come
to demonstrate for Southern civil
sympathy for civil rights in the
rights," and "This It student
South."

WALTER REUTHER
... blasts administration
paid health care for Social Se-
curity pensioners.
"I think that's a stinking state-
ment," snapped Senate Republican
Leader Everett M. Dirksen of Illi-
nois. He denied it was true.
Dirksen's blast came after an
STEWARDESSES
UNITED AIR LINES
now interviewing
for
SUMMER CLASSES
Here's a wonderful opportunity for
an exciting career as a Stewardess
on United Air Lines. You'll meet in-
teresting people, travel throughout
the country, and receive excellent
pay, employee benefits and paid va-
cations.
Candidates must be attractive, sin-
gle, 20 to 27 years of age, 5' 2" to
5' 8", weight proportional to height
-138 poundsBmaximum, and have
good vision. Candidates must be
high school graduates and should
have college or nurses' training or
related public experience.
For information and application,
contact your nearest
United Air Lines Office
or write to
D. West, Employment Manager
United Air Lines
5959 South Cicero-Avenue
Chicago 38, Illinois

EASTER CARDS
TRADITIONAL AND
CONTEMPORARY
OVERBECK'S

I

Attentio

)n all students...

ANTIQUE SHOW
and SALE
April 7, 8, 9
12 Noon--- 10 P.M.
Armory - 5th ond Ann Street
Admission-----c

Smoke L&M... Chesterfield... or Oasis but
DON'T THROW THOSE
EMPTY PACKS AWAY!

pir, rm, ripik

TON IGHT

W I! tf ;

fxffw fxw xw iff
x f sfx
ice'

tjMETT t MYERS TIOSJCC6 CO.

1G RE ETTES

k~WH

cigarettes can win you these

i . t _.--'-kr... ..n

SUINhE JACQUES BERGERAC
Coming Thursday - "HOME

FROM THE HILL"

EASTER CARDS
TRADITIONAL AND
CONTEMPORARY
OVERBECK'S

(Emerg
commit
tion of
since tr
The
ator of
for New~
stratior

("WED. EVE. at 8:30
ON STAGE
RUTH
SPAGE'S ,

1ST PRIZE

Positively
Ends
Wednesday

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3

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starring:

MELISSA HAYDEN
KENNETH JOHNSON
VERONIKA MLAKAR
BARBARA STEELE
PATRICIA KLEKOVIC
ORRIN KAYAN
AND
CORPS DE BALLET
with JOH N KRIZA, guest artist

U' u
PHILCO STEREO HI-FI
CONSOLETTE
To the student on this campus who
turns in the most empty packs of
L&M, Chesterfield and Oasist

PHILCO "SLENDER SEVENTEENER"
PORTABLE TV
To the student on this campus who
turns in the second largest number
of empty packs of pleasurel

Nothing to write ... no contest to enter! After enjoying any of America's three
great smoking favorites-L&M ... Chesterfield,... or Oasis cigarettes, just
save the wrappers, any combination of these brands is acceptable. But start
sving now -conntAt clnsAsnat 3 P. M.. Mav 13. 1960. Prizes will be

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