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March 23, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-03-23

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Mayan Remains Discovered
By 'Amateur' Archaeologist

JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD:
Emphasize European Studies

Current Novel Discusses
Problem of Jewish Survival

Dog

(Continued from Page 1)
discovered, including three pyra-
mids-large flat-topped platforms
from 40 to 100 feet high-and a
standing wall. Widely scattered in
the general vicinity of Lake La-
conha, the relics were all once
used for ceremonial purposes and
in several cases were located miles
from the nearest water.
This must have caused difficul-
ties while building and using them,
Milton speculated, which may have
been solved by using catch basins
to trap the abundant rainfall
otherwise absorbed by the porous
soil.
Milton notes that discovering
the ruins was largely an exercise
in human relations. The Indians
of the region, among the most
primitive in the hemisphere, had
never before revealed the location
of any of the "Homes of the
Jungle Gods," and one Mexican
authority "laughed when we told
him were were going to ask them
to help us."
The Dale Carnegie approach
paid off, however, as one Indian,

named "Bor," agreed to lead the
students to some ruins.
The natives regard the relics
with a mixture of reverence and
superstitious fear, Milton said. The
faces on some of the exterior
heiroglyphs had been chiseled off
by Indians seeking to protect
themselves from the evil spirits.
This has been the reason for
their refusal to help archaeologists
before. "They don't talk because
they're afraid the gods will strike'
back." Milton fears that, regret-
ting the confidence placed in the
whites, the natives may have un-
dertaken wholesale destruction of
the ruins as further insurance
when the explorers left.
Milton and his companion,
however, took many photographs,
and the Mexican government is
sending authorities to make recon-
structed paintings of the relics.
Questioned about his impression
of the jungle, Milton, who would
like to be a science writer and
archaeologist ,noted that he only
recently has rid himself of para-
sitic lice contracted during the ex-
pedition.

By RALPH KAPLAN
"It began as a program designed
for the wealthy young American
taking the grand tour," Prof.
James J. Gindin of the English
department said about one of the
first Junior Year Abroad pro-
grams.
The idea of the Junior Year
Abroad, which the University is
now considering, began at Smith
College just after World War I,
Prof. Gindin commented.
After Smith, the University of
Delaware started a program which
Sweet Briar College took over in
1948.
After the end of World War II
the emphasis in these programs
changed and "there was a much
greater emphasis on the academic
part of the program," Prof. Gindin
declared.
These programs are now offered
for both men and women at Mu-
nich, Paris, Madrid, Florence and
in each of the three Scandinavian
countries. In addition, there are

programs for women students at
Geneva and Fribourg, Switzerland.
Sponsoring institutions are Ham-
ilton College, Smith College, Sweet
Briar College, Rosary College,
Syracuse University and New York
University. Wayne State Univer-
sity's programs are at Munich and
Freiburg in Germany.
All programs with the exception
of the Scandinavian Seminar and
the Syracuse program in Florence
require preparation in the langu-
age concerned.
Newly added to the list of
schools are the University of Vien-
na and the University of Aix-
Marseille. Neither of these schools
require any language preparation.
Three or four years ago, Prof.
Gindin explained, students re-
ceived little credit on such pro-
grams. They now do work in the
language while in the program and
get more credit applied to their
American college work."
Depends on Departments
"It depends on the department,"
was Prof. Gindin's statement

uction

of

ART

WORK

TONIGHT at 8 at H ILLEL
PROF. ROBERT L. IGLEHART
Chairman, Art Department
In Lecture No. 3: "WHAT'S WORTH LIVING FOR?
Some Guidlines for the Perplexed of the 60's"
"Direction of Art"
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street

'a.

I

'i

I

ACROSS CAMPUS:
University Takes Third
In Debate Tournament

NEW

BIKES

I

I

The University of Michigan de-
bate team took third place over
the weekend in a tournament at
the University of Wisconsin spon-
sored by the Wisconsin Forensic
Union and Delta Sigma Rho, na-
tional honorary forensic society.
Roger Moorhus. '62, and Alan
E. O'Day, '61, debated the affirma-
Har pi fiord
Artist To Play
Alice Ehlers, one of the world's
outstanding harpsichordists, will
present a public concert with the
University Chamber Orchestra,
conducted by Prof. Josef Blatt of
the music school, at 8:30 tonight
in Rackham Lacture Hall.
Tonight's program will include
Johann Sebastian Bach's "Con-
certo in D minor," "Italian Con-
certo," and "Concerto in B-flat
major," as well as Franz Joseph
Haydn's "Concerto in D major."
Two seminars on harpsichord
interpretation and playing were
presented yesterday for University
students by the artist, who is a
teacher at the University of
Southern California.
ENDS TONIGHT
GREOY AA

v

' i

RALEIGH PRODUCTS
as low as
$51'95
SCHWINN RACERS
$49'9

I

I

BEAVER'S BIKE

I

605 Church

NO 5-6607

i

tive and Albret Fowerbaugh, '62,
and Richard 0. Parmelee, '61, the
negative side of the question, "Re-
solved: that Congress should have
the power to reverse decisions of
the Supreme Court."
The University of Wisconsin
placed first in the tournament, the
first of this type in which the
Michigan team has appeared in
several years. Michigan, with a
6-2 record and 313 team points,
finishedI third both in the win-loss
column and in over-all team point
total.
The next event for the Michigan
debate team will be a Cross-Ques-
tion tournament here Friday.
M , ,
From Scott Paper Company
Foundation the Regents accepted
$1,500 for scholarships in en-
gineering. International Nickel
Company, Inc., has given $1,415
for scholarships in engineering.
From Parke, Davis & Co. the
Regents accepted $1,250 repre-
senting the fourth quarterly pay-
ment for surgical research under
the direction of Prof. Charles
Gardner Child III of the medical
school.
Cranbrook Foundation, Bloom-
field Hills, has made a grant of
$1,200 for the George B. Booth
Traveling Fellowship in Architec-
ture.
Two insurance companies have
given a total of $1,100 for the Ac-
tuarial Science Program. The do-
nors were: John Hancock Mutual
Life Insurance Company $1,000;
and National Life Insurance Com-
pany $100. These gifts were made
through the University's Develop-
ment Council.
From Julian and Helene Sprague
Foundation, Williamston, Mass.,
the Regents accepted $1,000 for
the foundation's fellowship which
has been awarded to Mrs. Manly
Johnson for graduate work in mu-
sical art.
Dr. Glen Levin Swiggett of
Washington, D.C. has given $1,000
to establish the Bain - Swiggett
Prize in Poetry.
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDING THURSDAY
For a priceyou canseher
n the "private upstairs room"
of a sleazy Madrid fun-joint
} -
r-
1 You've
JieWomn

about credit from the American
school towards a student's major.
A student will often get general
departmental credits but not
credit for the specific course he
took in cases where the school's
offerings do not correspond.
Even if a student does not get
all his needed credits, he "can
usually work this out in his senior
year if he's on an established
program," Prof. Gindin said.
"Obviously these programs work
out best in Paris or Munich for
the French or German major," he
continued. Another case in which
the program enables the students
to receive full credit is when a
pre-medical student take his lib-
eral arts courses in Europe and
uses these to satisfy his distribu-
tion requirements.
Prof. Gindin estimated that
"about three-fourths of the stu-
dents go for work in their depart-
ments and one-fourth go to study
in other departments."
Benefit Language Majors
These programs usually benefit
the language major more than
other departmental majors.
If a student is interested in one
of these programs he discusses it
with Prof. Gindin who will inform
him which sponsoring institution
to apply to.
Before a student goes, Prof. Gin-
din has him consult with his con-
centration adviser to investigate
what arrangements can be made
for courses he takes abroad. a
"No promises are made before
the student goes, however," Prof.
Gindin explained. The final deci-
sion is made when the student
comes back.
He said that one of the biggest
arguments for a one-semester pro-'
gram, like the one that Syracuse1
University has at Florence, is that
it doesn't interfere with the stu-
dent's major."
Census
The Constitution requires that
the number of people in thej
nation be counted every ten
years, so on April 1 the "Bigl
Count" will begin.
The Census Bureau says that1
all students are to be counted in
the community in which they 1
are attending school.
University students will bec
counted in Ann Arbor immedi-
ately after vacation. Individual
census reports will be distrib-
uted at their places of resi-
dence. The bureau asks that
these reports be promptly filled
out and ready for the census
taker assigned to the particular
area.
The 1960 census is a census
of population and housing. This
means that one out of every
four households, and one out of
every four students in group
quarters, will be asked to fill out
an additional questionnaire.
Union Picks

By HENRY LEE
"I wanted 'Eva' written because
the new generation must know
how to deal with a problem that
confronted me; the problem of
survival," Mrs. Eda Lowe said
yesterday.
"Eva," which was written by
Meyer Levin, describes the plight
of a young Jewish girl from Nazi
aggression during World War ILI
"War is so indifferent and there
is no help from the outside. When
so many people were being killed,
I decided that I must" tell the
world about it if I could survive."
Mrs. Lowe pretended to be a
U Awards
International
Scholarshipsl
By BEATRICE TEODORO
For the academic year, 1960,
about $26,000, worth of scholar
ships were granted to students
from 16 countries. Prof. James M.
Davis, director of the internation-
al Center, said.
These scholarships are set aside
from University funds, and are
allocated by a committee made
up of professors from; various
schools.
There are two types of grants
available, Davis said. One is gen-
eral, open to any foreign student,
and providing tuition for a semes-
ter or year. Faced with many
more applicants than scholar-
ships, the committee is required
to adopt certain eligibility cri-
teria beyopd those of ability and
financial need.
First, the committee generally
favors students who are near the
completion of a degree, rather
than those who are beginning
undergraduate studies.
Second, the applicants should
preferably have demonstrated aca-
demic ability at the University
before application.
Finally, the committee attempts
to maintain a spread over the pro-
fessional departments and over
the countries represented.
The other type of aid available
comes under speca rgas

I " 1 11
ff IIIIi P [ Iq'H Iwll{li
I 't 1 y ugJ'I
l
DIAL NO 5-6290

i

Ukranian peasant girl. She claimed
that her greatest problem was try-
Sng to keep her identity as a Jew
while posing as a non-Jew.
When asked to compare Leon
Uris's best seller "Exodus" to
"Eva," she said that Exodus does
not emphasize the human prob-
lems of Israel. "It seems that
people don't like to hear about the
unpleasant past."
Mrs. Lowe believed that from
the historical point of view, people
have heard about World War I
and now they should hear more
about World War II.
Relating her experiences during
the War, Mrs. Lowe spoke to an
audience of the 1960 United Jew-
ish Appeal fund drive last night
at the League.
The money raised will be used
overseas for absorption and eco-
nomic integration of people from
25 countries into Israel. She said
that the population has more than
doubled in Israel since 1948 and
assistance is needed because "the
young people are our future."
"When I came to Israel, UJA
gave me housing, taught me how
to speak the language, and showed
me how to integrate into the cul-
ture."
Bus Tickets
No wOn, Sale
Tickets for Student Government
Council's Willopolitan bus service
to Willow Run and Metropolitan
airports on Friday will. be avail-
able through Thursday, Willopoli-
tan chairman Daniel .Murphy, '62,
announced yesterday.
Applications for seats are avail-
able at the main desks of living
units, all travel bureaus, and the
SGC offices in the Student Activ-
ities Building from 3:15 p.m. to
5:30 p.m. each day. The price is
$1.25 to Willow Run, $1.50 to Met-
ropolitan airport.
As of today, tickets will no long-
er be mailed out after applications
are received.
Busses will be running from
10:30 a.m. to 8:15 p.m. on Friday,
and a return bus will be run Sun-
day, April 3, after vacation, The
return bus will leave Metropolitan
at 9 p.m. and Willow Run at 9:40
p.m., Murphy said..

NOW!
ENDS FRIDAY

"Our nominee for THE FUNNIEST
MOVIE OF THE YEAR!" -World Telegram
"A Hilarious Movie!" --Life
A RiCXRAAD}RpQQ~lI -
A CRUBNM PSCTM5 SREUAN t

oim

« « 1
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION '
1429 Hill Street
* I
Announces
iiPASSOVER SEDARIM AND MEALS
April 11-19«
P eC fHillel Members in«
Please Read Carefully currnt standing at N Gn-Members
full year's rate and Guests
« Special Package Rate for all 16 Meals . .. . .... . ... . . . $30.00 $34.00
Each Seder (Complete Ceremonial & Dinner........... . .75 4.25
Each Lunch ..................................... 1.40 1.75
Each Dinner .................................... 2.30 2.75 I
Enclosed is my check n money orderf (check appropriate box) drawn to
'IB'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Trust Account" for $ to cover
the following: (Be sure to specify.)
W ALL 16 MEALS I
ll Seder, Monday, April 11 C] Dinner, Friday, April 15
Lunch, Tuesday, April 12 D Lunch, Saturday, April 16
I QlSeder, Tuesday, April 12 Q Dinner, Saturday, April 16
* ® Lunch, Wednesday, April 13 F Lunch, Sunday, April 17
* L[] Dinner, Wednesday, April 13 CJ Dinner, Sunday, April 17
Q Lunch, Thursday, April 14 H Lunch, MondaysApril 18 «
LIQ Dinner, Thursday, April 14 F Dinner, Monday, April 18
! U]Lunch, Friday, April 15 [ Lunch, Tuesday, April 19
U
« «
NAME;
(Please Print)
CAMPUS ADDRESSPHONE--- PHONE-
«I«
!: bL Air 0

]lew Board
The junior officers making up
the Union's Student Activities Ex-
ecutive Council were appointed last
night.
Perry Morton, '61, announced
the appointments.
The Council, made up of the
eight major committee heads, con-
sists of William Lamson, '62, Uni-
versity Affairs; Paul C. Carder,
'62, Alumni and Faculty Affairs;
Richard B. Small, '62, Interna-
tional Affairs; Todd L. Fay, '62,
Public Relations; David M. Poh-
lod, '62, Special Events; Michael T
J. Balgley, '62, Student Affairs; T
David P. Baron, '62E, Social Ac-
tivities; and Robert I. Hunter, '62, 8
Personnel.

MONTHLY FORUM MEETING OF
Socialist Party-Socialist Democratic Federation
Ann Arbor Branch
DR. GRACE C. LEE
author and editor

"MAO'S CHINA"
An interpretation and analysis of China today
with reference to the current scene
and a prognosis of future developments.
ie: Place:
rsday, March 24, YMCA Building
D P.M. 110 N. Fourth Ave.

im
hu
:00

A&D

LOBBY

March 23

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