100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 13, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, ,MARCH 13,1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY MARCH 12 1~Rft

. y a. +vvaa . uv . *fvv.,

polo Teatro di Milano To Appear Six Days in Detroit

I

7I

ml

the actors express themselves by
pantomime, gestures, even acro-
batics, as well as with music and
rhythm.
The company comes to the
United States after a tour of 92
cities in 22 countries - ranging
from Tokyo and Buenos Aires to
Moscow and Edinburgh and In-
cluding Africa and the Far East.
The London Spectator's com-
ment on their performance is ty-
pical of critical reception.
". ..A glorious medley and com-
pendium of everything the fantas-
tic ingenuity of man has devised
. acrobatics and juggling, sing-
ing and dancing, pantomime and
circus . . . Arouses constant won-
der and joy."
"The Servant of Two Masters"
will be presented at 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday through Sunday. Matinees
will be held on Saturday at 2:00
p.m. and Sunday at 3:00 p.m.
* * *
An exhibition of 22 oils and sev-
eral drawings by Prof. Frede Vidar
of the architecture college is cur-
rently being held at Alumni Me-
morial Hall.
The paintings are Prof. Vidar's
interpretation of Mount Athos,
which he visited in 1958.
"Athos is an anachronism," he
explained. "It remains today as a
survivor of an early Christian cul-
ture and as a last living remnant
of the great Byzantine Empire in
Europe.
"For the past thousand years,
the peninsula has been a form
of theocratic federation with all
land and property belonging to its
20 great feudal monastic founda-
tions. Life has been regulated to
the protocol and traditions of the
Byzantine.
"Since the legendary visit of the
Virgin Mary, women have been ex-
cluded but miracles are still al-
most daily occurrences, at least
in the visions of the anchorites.
Athos is a state of mind as much
as it is a state of being, and be-
cause of this, its identity may
survive the cross-currents of pro-
gress."
The exhibition, sponsored joint-
ly by the graduate school and the
architecture college, will continue
until April 6.
The Wayne State University
Theatre's production of "A Trip
Abroad," a new translation of the
famous French farce, "Le Voyage
de Monsieur Perrichon" by Labiche
and Martin, opens at 8:30 p.m.
Friday.
Additional performances will be
held on Saturday and on March
24-26.
Labiche, in collaboration with
Edouard Martin, applied Moliere's
farce technique to the customs and
types of the middle classes. Un-
like Moliere, his comic genius was
officially recognized by his ad-
mission to the Academie Francaise.
He holds an established place
in the repertoire of the Comedie
Francalse, but is seldom seen on
the English-speaking stage.
Tickets are on sale at the Wayne
University Ticket Office at Cass
and Putnam.
* * *
The New York City Opera Com-
pany will present their widely ac-
claimed production of "The Ballad
of Baby Doe," an American opera
by Douglas Moore and John La-
touche, at 8:20 p.m. Friday at De-
troit's Masonic Temple.
"The Ballad of Baby Doe" re-
volves around the rise and fall of
H. A. W. Tabor, a real-life Colora-
do silver baron, who became the
richest man in the territory, rocked
the state with his divorce and
subsequent marriage to the up-
start Baby Doe, was impoverished
in 1893 when Congress voted the
country onto the gold standard,
went bankrupt and died.
It Is said that Baby Doe, faith-

ful to the end, lived until 1935 in
a shack on the outskirts of her
husband's most lucrative mine.
Offer Junior
Girls Grants
Any junior woman may now
apply for one of the three avail-
able Ethel A. McCormick Activ-
ities Recognition Awards. Each of
the $100.00 yearly stipends will be
based mainly on participation in
activities, but scholarship and
financial need will also be con-
sidered.
Applicants for the awards may
obtain petitions at the Under-
graduate Office of the League and
must return them there by Thurs-
day.
Interviews will be held Wednes-
day, Thursday and Friday, April
6, 7 and 8.

Report Tells'
Public View
Of Training
(Continued from Page 1)
considerations before a final deci-
sion is made."
In fact, when asked why more
young people don't go to college,
72 per cent regard cost as the most
important hindrance. Two-thirds
also think that personal factors
such as attitudes, ambition and
industriousness are relevant.
A quarter say some people want
to make money quickly and stay
out of college for this reason, while
another quarter attributes non-
attendance to early marriages or
military service.
Almost 40 per cent think that
smaller colleges are cheaper than
large universities, but only one in
ten says the small schools are
more expensive.
Aware of Pressure
An important section of the
survey report notes that "people
are conscious of the growing pres-
sure on colleges in the state." Al-
though not many are aware of the
actual numbers of the surge which
is soon to come, about 50 per cent
realize there will be "a lot more"
students in our colleges and uni-
versities ten years from now.
Only a fourth of the population
is not aware of this crisis.
In addition to higher taxes, a
majority of the 950 people sampled
favor building more colleges rather
than enlarging present facilities
to take care of this expansion.
Expanding existing institutions
is favored by only one fourth of
the people. The remainder favor
some combination of both pro-
posals.
How do people in Michigan
evaluate colleges and universities
as they are now? Most look for
general academic quality. Men-
tioned half as often as academic
quality is competence in a special
area like law or medicine or agri-
culture.
The survey finds "convenience,
cost, type of support, morality, and
rules are scarcely mentioned at
all."
Prefer Small Schools
However: "When most people
think of higher education, they
think of general rather than ad-
vanced academic training. When
directly asked about size in refer-
ence to where one might get a
better education, small colleges
were chosen over big institutions
by a ratio of 4 to 3, with a third
of the population saying there was
no difference.
"Small classes and the results of
such smallness were the major ad-
vantage reported for small institu-
tions. The facilities, varied cur-
riculum and faculties that are part
of most large institutions were
seen as the strength of such uni-
versities from an evaluative point
of view."
But one third of the people in-
terviewed were not even familiar
with universities in Michigan -
either they didn't know the names
of any schools or didn't know that
a university does anything besides
campus teaching.
No single activity besides cam-
pus teaching stands out in people's
minds.
Of those who mention research,
about half speak of medical re-
search. Universities are seen as the
source-alone or along with in-
dustry and government--of most
discoveries and research advances.
The report notes, "As might be
expected from the prominence
given medical research in the pub-
lic view, one-half of all adults in
Michigan nominate medicine as

an area of research deserving tax
support. No other area is men-
tioned by half as many."
Only questions which highlight
the survey were included in this
preliminary report. Further analy-
sis will be presented in a series
of reports within the next few
months.
To Analyze Sub-Groups
Analyzing sub - groups in the
sample, these reports will cover
questions such as: Do low income
persons regard the cost of a col-
lege education as prohibitive?
What segments of the state popu-
lation view colleges and faculties
most favorably, and how likely is
it that this kind of support can
be activated and extended?
The survey report warns "the
data presented here do not neces-
sarily define the path of adminis-
trative policy."
It points out that in some cases
it may be good administrative
policy to follow the public's view-
point; in other cases the expert
"may rightly feel that a given
course of action is best within the
values of public policy but this
action may not be understood by
the public."

By RALPH KAPLAN
"New professors and the NDEA
Act caused the initiation of a
Southern Asia Committee," Robert
I. Crane of the history department
said.
The forming of this committee
in early 1959 was the climax of
three years work by the University
to provide a comprehensive pro-
gram for the study of India and
its neighboring countries.
Recruiting of faculty for the
new program was begun in 1956
when the University decided it
ought to have a program in South-
ern Asia to supplement its Far
Eastern and Near Eastern Studies
programs.
There were "too few professors
at the time to do this," explained
Prof. Crane.
These included a member of the
art department and another mem-
ber of the political science depart-
ment.
Lists Professors
Prof. Crane came from the Uni-
versity of Chicago to teach Indian
history. Other new professors in-
cluded Prof. Richard Park, politi-
cal science; Prof. L. A. Peter Gos-
ling, geography; Prof. O. L. Cha-
varria -Aguilar, Hindi; Visiting
Prof. Siba Sen, also for Indian
history; and Prof. Arthur Link,
Buddhist and Hindi thought.
The National Defense Education
Act of 1958 was a great help to
the program. It provided fellow-
ship money for students interested
in South Asian studies, and money
for schools offering what were
considered to be critical languages.
One of the critical languages
was Hindi, which enabled the
University to receive enough gov-
ernment aid to hire language
training assistants.
A combination of government
Puerto Rican
T1o Head Latin
mericans
Aida Rodriguez, Grad., from
Puerto Rico, was recently elected
president of the Latin American
Club.
Other officers are vice-president,
Eduardo Fraute; secretaries, Jaime
Mosquera and Ann Spencer; and
treasurer, Eleanor Overll.
Organization
Notices
Campus elections. Polls workers need-
ed for campus elections March 15. 16.
Sign up for a time and place. SGC
headquarters, SAB. Call NO 3-0553 or
come in after 3 p.m.
Congregationa Disciples Z & R Stu-
dent Guild, movie, discussion: "Bur-
den of Truth," March 13, 7 p.m., 524
Thompson.
Gamma Delta, Luth. Student Club,
supper, discussion: "Individualism or
Group Conformity," March 13, 6 p.m.,
1511 washtenaw.
India Students Assoc., Panel Discus-
sion: "India's Foreign Policy," March
13, 3 p.m., Union, Conf. Rm. Partici-
pants: Profs. Crane, Park, Sen.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia,
March 14, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB. Cafe y
conversaclon.
Lutheran Student Assoc., meeting,
March 13, 7 p.m., Hill St. and S. Forest
Ave. Speaker: Dr. R. E. Van Deusen,
Washington, D. C., "The 1960's: Decade
of Destiny"
* 4 *
Young Republican Club, March 15,
8 p.m., Union, 3-0. Speaker: Paul D.
Bagwell.
Student Activities Bldg. Admin. Bd.,
Desk space available on second floor
of SAB. Organizations interested in
space ,contact Sutart Dow, Rm. 2535,
SAB by mail by March 18.
* * *
Political Issues Club, "Another Tui-
tion Increase?" with Vice-President
Pierpont, March 15, 8 p.m., Union,
Rms. R and s.

Mich. Christian Fellowship, March
13, 4 p.m., Lane Ball. Speaker: H.
Stone, "Christ Concealed in the Old
Testament."

TO STUDY INDIA, NEIGHBORS:
University Starts Southern Asia Studies

(Editor's Note: This is the last
in a series of five articles on for-
eign studies programs at the Uni-
v'ersity. Previous articles have dealt
with Far Eastern, Russian and Near
Eastern Studies.)

(

and University funds in late 1959
gave "substantial funds" for the
library, Prof. Crane continued.
The improved library has "un-
officially" been selected as one of
the six libraries in the nation that
will get books on Southern Asia
under Public Law 480.
"Quite good," was Prof. Crane's
description of the enrollment in
the program. The increased num-
ber of courses and rising interest
has raised the number of students
in the program from a handful to
"about 30."
Evidence of greater interest is
reflected in the record of fellow-
ship applications. In 1959 there
were eight completed applications
for four fellowship positions. For
the five 1960 fellowships avail-
able, there have been sixteen com-
pleted applications.
Applications Rise
Prof. Crane explained that the
increase in applications came
"without a large amount of pub-
licity," in contrast with some
schools that put out "thirty or
forty page brochures," he con-
tinued.
Rising student interest has
caused University interest in ex-
panding both the curriculum and
faculty of the program. Three

courses which the Committee on
Southern Asia Studies has recom-
mended are:
1) Anthropology of Southern
Asia. Prof. Crane stated that lack
of this course is "a major gap in
the program."
2) Bahasa Indonesia - a langu-
age spoken in Indonesia and Mal-
ava and probably the second most
important Southeast Asian langu-
age.
3) Development Economics of
Southern Asia.
The Committee on Southern
Asian Studies will "probably" be-
come a Center on Southern Asian
Studies. This will give the pro-
gram "additional effectiveness,"
commented Professor Crane, and
the Center "will be more or less
operated on the lines of the Center
for Japanese Studies," he contin-
ued.
A Center can do more than a
committee to "get money and co-
ordinate graduate training pro-
grams," explained Prof. Crane.
A student cannot normally either
major in or receive a degree in
Southern Asian' studies. The
courses dealing with Southern Asia
are offered by the art, history,
geography and political science
departments.

r -'

HAVE TO STUDY?
Grab a quick bite
at HILLEL SUPPER CLUB
Today, 6-7 P.M.
B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill St.

Held Over
3rd Big Week
ACADEMY
AWARD
Nominees

.ts=

DIAL
NO 5-6290

ldppp

----Lv---NP

ELIZABETH TAYLOR
KATHARINE HEPBURN
"Best Actress"

EUZABETU MOITCOUERY MOVATIIE
TAYLOR CLIFT HEPBURN

Also Nominated for
BEST ART
DIRECTION
ACADEMY AWARD

97b~

6mm

S.G.C.
Cinemlaqul
Tonight at 7:00 and 9:00
ELIA KAZAN'S
"ON THE
WATERFRONT"
with Marlon Brando,
Lee J. Cobb, Eva Marie Saint,
Rod Steiger, Karl Malden
ACADEMY AWARD
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

Bob VoIlen
cordially invites you
to
VOTE FOR
BOB VOLLEN
L.S.&A.
PRESI DENT
March 15 &' 16

DIAL NO 2-6264

NOW!

... _

I

I

IF YOU NEVER SEE ANOTHER MOTION
PICTURE IN YOUR LIFE YOU MUST SEE
Story
,, .t4E Of Our
FREDSTA~hm nPE-IN 3

TUESDAY at 8 at HILLEL
RABBI IRWIN GRONER
Asst. Rabbi, Congregation Shaarey Zedek, Detroit

II

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan