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March 01, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

~1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TYTESDAY_ MARPM 1' " 149h

TT7Iro"Lsx lffAlitt 1,I lb

SPEAKS TO JOURNALISM STUDENTS:

Koether Says Free Market Requires Free Press

Petitioning To Begin Today
For All Positions in League

ernment intervention, adding that
intervention might be a far more
insidious enemy of freedom than
is Communism because it is not
so easily recognized.
Economic pressures are anoth-
er restriction upon the operation
of the nation's press. "Labor un-
ions and obsolete work rules are
causing newspaper publishers to
face demands which impose high-
er costs without compensating in-
creases in activity."
He continued these economic
pressures have not only frustrat-
ed freedom in the mechanical and
production operations, but have
also affected editorial flexibility.
These labor or economic influ-
ences have had a leveling effect
which has brought the star re-
porter's pay closer to the office
boy's and has left less margin to
recognize exceptional talent.
"No wonder the editors of many
newspapers are expressing grave

concern over the problem of get-
ting the ablest young men and
women to enter daily journalism."
Threatening Dangers
The most threatening danger to
the freedom of the press may
come from the press itself. "The
obituary by not taking advantage
of its opportunity to preserve
American moral values and free
markets on all fronts," Koether
said.
Also, "Impartiality in report-
ing is not achieved by assigning
a 'pro-business' writer to the
business page. In certain complex
areas, the press does need special-
ists or eggheads, but it certainly
cannot afford to have 'scrambled
eggheads'."
These writers must work for a
free press.
"A free press which defends the
free ma'rket is not defending vest-
ed interests, but instead is speak-
ing out against the special privi-

I

E

Two To Speak
At Republican
Group Meeting
University Prof. Philip McCal-
lum, newly-appointed Administra-
tor of the Small Business Adminis-
tration, will be the featured speak-
er at the Ann Arbor Republican's
meeting at 8 p.m. Thursday at the
Ann Arbor Community Center.
Guest speaker from Grand
Rapids will be Judge John Letts,
the first Negro in the state ever
elected to a judgeship without
previously having been appointed
to the post .
After the speakers, the proposed
Republican 1960 City Platform will
be ready by Joe Edwards, Platform
Committee Co-Chairman.

PROF. PHILIP McCALLUM
... to speak

ACROSS CAMPUS:
Engineers' Wives GroupTce
To Elect New Officers

The Ann Arbor Chapter of the
Society of Engineers' Wives will
hold elections at 8 tonight in the
Fireside Room of Lane Hall.
"Wives of graduate and under-
graduate engineers are welcome,"
publicity chairman Lee Walker
said.
Dancing .
Sign-ups for League dancing
classes will be held tomorrow at
7:15 p.m. in the League.
These classes will be taught by
Joseph Eder and will include both
beginning and advanced classes.
The classes wil be for eight weeks
on either Tuesday or Wednesday
at 7:15 p.m. and there will be a
charge of four dollars for men.
Bridge . . .
An eight-week set of bridge
classes will begin tonight at the
League.
The lessons will be given at 7
p.m. each Tuesday for eight weeks
and will cost $4.50.
j ichifish . . .
Michifish, the women's synchro-
nized swimming group, will hold

tryouts at 7 p.m. Thursday at the
Women's Pool.
All old members will meet for
an Ensian photo at the pool 7:30
Wednesday.
Lecture . .
Oskar Stonorov. architect and
city planner, will present an il-
lustrated lecture on the problems
of modern architecture at 3:30
p.m. Tuesday in the Arch. Aud.
Stonorov's works have been pri-
marily, but not exclusively, major
housing developments, including
the Gratiot-Orleans Project in De-
troit. This project, designed in
collaboration with architects Ya-
masaki and Gruen, was awarded
a gold medal.

leges of tariff and subsidy and
the socially harmful effects of re-
strictive interventionism,
"It is speaking for the interests
of all people whose material wel-
fare can only be improved by a
free market, just as their spiri-
tual and political welfare can only
thrive with a free conscience and
a free ballot."
Cinema Guild
Profits Benefit
Organizations
By STEPHANIE ROUMELL
"Most people don't realize it, but
the main purpose that Cinema
Guild serves is to provide grants
for needy student organizations,"
Shelly Goodman, '61, chairman of
Cinema Guild commented recently.
Any needy student organization
may apply to Cinema Guild for
sponsorship and receive grants, she
explained. In return, members of
the organization deliver posters
and usher at a film.
"They receive their grant
whether the film makes money or
not."
Cinema Guild is entirely self-
supporting. Places on its board of
eight, consisting of undergraduate
and graduate students, are ob-
tained by petitioning through
Student Government Council.
Hires Manager
The board hires a manager, as-
sistant manager, and a projection-
ist to work in the theatre, the
Architecture Aud.
The choice of film is ultimately
up to the student board. Manager
Edward Weber checks over numer-
ous film catalogues and selects a
list of 150 to 200 films from which
the board chooses the Cinema
Guild program.
The board members may also
add their own suggestions to the
list.
The board's main concern in
choosing films from the list is
selecting those that will have the
widest student appeal.
Group Reports
Discrimination
In Local Shop
(Continued from Page 1)
reply was received, according to
the Commission's report to the'
Council.
On Jan. 13 a second letter by
certified mail was sent to Mrs.
Cousins, inviting her to a Jan.
19 meeting. Again the letter was
unanswered.
The Commission sent Mrs.
Cousins a longer letter on Jan. 26,
finding after "careful investiga-
tion" that "the complaint of Mrs.
Brooksis substantiated, and that
your organization is guilty of dis-
criminatory treatment of Mrs.
Brooks. The commission is also
of the opinion that your action is
not representative of the practices
of Ann Arbor business establish-
ments."
The Commission said, "It isnour
opinion that your action Is, under
the ordinance of the City of Ann
Arbor establishing the Human Re-
lations Commission . .. inimical
to democracy and the public wel-
fare."
The third letter was released to
the press.
On Jan..28 Mayor Cecil O.Creal
asked Chairman Whited if he
would call Mrs. Cousins. Whited
did so, and told the Commission
he talked to her for about one
hour, 45 minutes.
According to Whited's recollec-
tion of the conversation, Mrs.
Cousins said she had been ill, that

she had not known who the Com-
mission was, that she knew noth-
ing of the incident until the phone
conversation, that she had tried
unsuccessfully to reach Henry
Lewis, chairman of the Commis-
sion's Executive Committee.
Attempts to arrange a meeting
failed, Whited said, because Mrs.
Cousins "began to put on all kinds
of provisions" and she "would not
be pinned to a date even so broad
as within a month or two."
Whited said the alleged at-
tempts to call Lewis were not
corroborated, and that Mrs.
Cousins did not seem concerned
with cooperating with the Com-
mission.
Commission members agreed
there was no new material in the
conversation that would justify
a change of action and forwarded
their final report to the Council.

Petitioning for all League posi-
tions opens today and will con-
tinue through Monday, Mary
Wilcox, '60, chairman of the In-
terviewing and Nominating Com-
mittee announced recently.
Available positions include all
executive offices: president, inter-
nal vice-president, co-ordinating
vice-president, vice-president in
charge of class projects, and the
vice-president in charge of finance.
Women may also apply for
membership in League Council,
which is composed of the chairmen
of undergraduate committees.
Other positions open for peti-
tioning are on the Women's Judi-
THE JOHN BARTON
WOLGAMOT PLAYERS
in
Jarry's savage burlesque
UBO ROI
(Gopotty Rex)
"The Surrealists invented
nothing better."
-Andre Gide
SAT. Ci SUN., MARCH 5 Ci 6
8:30 P.M. Admission 95c
Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg.
Buy tickets at Bob Marshall's

.

ciary Council, the Interviewing
and Nominating Committee, and
the central committees of Frosh
Weekend and Junior Girls' Play.
Women may obtain petitions at
the League Undergraduate Offilce
or from their dormitory represen-
tatives, and should sign up for
their interviews when returning
their completed petitions.
DIAL NO 5-6290
NOMINATED FOR TWO
"BEST ACTRESSES"
ACADEMY AWARDS
TAYLOR HEURN CL
TENNESSEE JOSEPU L.SMlll
WILUANMS - MANIEWIM U rnI
Our Next Attraction
will be
"The Mouse That Roared"

IF

All Foreign

Students

of all foreign military services
are cordially invited to attend
THE MILITARY BALL

I

UNION BALLROOM

MAR. 4, 8:30-12

4
4

TICKETS $3.00

V
)

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im-

BURTON HOLMES
TRAVELOGUE
ISRAEL--LAND OF
THE BIBLE
Motion Pictures In Natural Color
Narrated By Robert Mallett
THURSDAY- 8:30,P.M.
Tickets: $1.00 (Main Floor, Reserved) -50c (Balcony, Unreserved)
On Sale Daily 2-4 P.M. and Thursday 10 A.M.-8:30 P.M.

PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

HILL AUDITORIUM

Organization
Notices

NOW !

-y u 1

DIAL
NO 2-6264

ODETTA
FOLK MUSIC
March 13 at 8:30
Detroit Institute of Arts
Auditorium
Tickets at
THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University NO 3-6922

(Use of this column for an-
nouncements is available to offi-
cially recognized and registered
organizations only. Organizations
planning to be active for the spring
semester should register by Feb. 29.
Forms available, 2011 Student Acti-
vities Bldg.)
International Folk Dancers, Folk
Dancing & Instruction,.March 2, 8 p.m.,
Lane Hall.
Russian Circle, March 2, 7:30 p.m.,
3rd Floor Conference Rm., Union.
Speaker: Miss Ronnie Hamburger, "The
Unusual in Russia 1959." Slides.
Young Republican Club, Program
about (irassroot Politics and Organiza-
tion, March 1, 7:30 p.m., 3 K Union.
Political Issues Club, H. Chandler
Davis Case with his attorney, Mr. Dou-
van, March 1, 8 p.m., Union, 3rd Floor.

C. S. Forester's great human drama
and true adventure!

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PETITIONS
for MUSKET
CENTRAL COMMITTEE
accepted until 5 P.M. Wed., March 2
Union Student Offices-
Sign up for an interview.

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Also CARTOON and NEWS

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HERE IS A PICTURE THAT
ENCOURAGES AN EXCITING
REFRESHMENT OF FAITH IN
FILMS. REVEALS THE
EXPLOSION OF A FRESH
CREATIVE TALENT... TRE-
MENDOUSLY MEANINGFUL I
-Crowther, Times
'A picture everyone with
a serious concern for fine
films will not want to missI!
-Beckley, Herald Tribe
FRANCOIS TRUFFA'S

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r

IF

SEMIN

AR: 2nd in a series on Religious Beliefs

. A. 4 1

11

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