100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 05, 1960 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A'ELCOME STUDENTS
We have six expert barbers
in our air-conditioned shop
to keep your hair neat and
we!I-groomed.
U. of M. BARBERS
715 North University

SPECIAL PROGRAMS:
IC Welcomes New Foreign Students

By BEATRICE TEODORO
About 100 entering foreign stu-
dents are expected by the Inter-
national Center staff, said Robert
B. Klinger, IC Program Director.
Studeits from abroad are ad-
mitted if they fulfill the academic
requirements, prove financial re-
sponsibility, and have a command
of the English language. However
freshmen are not admitted.
Upon arriving at the University,
foreign students are referred to
the IC. There they can obtain in-
formation about housing, orienta-
tion, counseling, and registration.
Each student is assigned a

Y {.

STEAKS and CHOPS'
our.specialty
For Delicious
LUNCHES
and
SHORT-ORDERSJ
at
REASONABLE PRICES
it's
FowersCpffee Shop
2204 West Stadium Blvd. Phone NO 2-9442

counselor, who assists him on im-
migration and naturalization re-
quirements, employment regula-
tions, laws of the home govern-
ment such as currency- exchange
and visas, finances and personal
problems.
He is also directed to an aca-
demic adviser who will explain
the departmental requirements
and degree prerequisites, grading
system.and other scholastic infor-
mation.
The Orientation Program in-
cludes most of the activities that
are presented for all new stu-
dents, such as tours, coke dates
and mixers. However some events
are planned especially for inter.
national students.
Special Groups
Special Orientation groups of
International students are formed.
The leaders are trained to show
the students what will particular-
ly interest them, keeping in mind
that many of them are graduate
students.
.On Tuesday an International
Mixer, open to foreign and Ameri-
can students, was held at the Wo-
man's Athletic Bldg.
Today an important briefing
session will be conducted by the
IC staff. It will present certain
academic and social definitions
and customs that may be new to
the students.
Also tomorrow a formal recep-
tion is planned at the Rackham
3. 0
IELVIS
IN THE ARMY
"Just another G.I." they said.
But two dozen photographers
recorded his first Army meal.
Sevenity reporters covered
his first Army haircut. 400
females mobbed the bus that
took him to camp. 500 scream-
ing teen-age girls met him at
the dock in Germany. The
Army's attempts to pass off
Elvis Presley as "just an
average private" is one of
the most outrageously funny,
true stories of our genera-
tion. Read all about "Elvis
Presley in The Army."
In the February issue of
Re dook
The Magazine for Young Adults
Now on sale at all newsstands

Amphitheater and Assembly Hall,
'to welcome the entering foreign
students.
Introduce Students
During the orientation period,
the students are also introduced
to the many programs sponsored
by the IC and other international
and religious groups.
There is the Wives Program,
under the direction of Mrs. K.
Meade of theIC. Often the wives
of students are not studying, and
find themselves alone and idle in
strange surroundings. The pro-
gram helps them adjust to the
new social situation and helps
them meet other wives and home-
makers.
The Ann Arbor-Washtenaw
Council of Churches, in coopera-
tion with Catholic and Jewish
groups and the Protestant Foun-
dation for International Students
sponsor a Host Family Program.
Each new student who wishes to
meet an American family is as-
signed to one who will "host"him
for a year.
This can include visits, dinners,
and other cultural exchanges, de-
pending upon the interests and
time of both parties.
State Creates
Legal Institute
For Education
The University of Michigan Law
School, the Wayne State Univer-
sity Law School, and the State
Bar of Michigan reported the for-
mation of an Institute on Con-
tinuing Legal Education to the
University Regents on Friday,
Jan. 22.
The institute is designed to op-
erate on a self-?sustaining basis.
It will greatly expand the activi-
ties of the two state universities
in continuing legal education,
University Vice - President and
Dean of Faculties Marvin L. Nie-
huss told the Regents,
Prof. Charles W. Joiner of the
University Law School is the head
of the Institute's executive com-
mittee.
Conferences and short courses
conducted byT the Institute will be
arranged in' cooperation with the
University Extension Service and
the Division of Adult Education.
Formation of the Institute came
at the request of the State Bar
Association.

Mathematics
Professor
Love Dies
Prof. Emeritus Clyde E. Love of
the mathematics department,
widely noted author of books*-on
mathematics and bridge, died
Sunday at his home in Ann Ar-
bor at age77.
Prof. Love published three math
textbooks, "Analytic Geometry,"
"Elements of Analytic Geometry"
and "Differential and Integral
Calculus," which have run to- 13
editions.
Most of all, Prof. Love was an
outstanding teacher who was re-
vered by many students. His abil-
ity as an expositor explains the
great success of his mathematics
texts which for some years led in
worldwide sales.
After retirement his continued
activity was shown by the publi-
cation of two bridge books,
"Squeeze Plays in Bridge" and
"Bridge Squeezes Complete." The
latter, which appeared only a few
months before his death, has re-
ceived glowing notices in bridge
publications and reviews.

PR:ECISION1
PORTABLEETYPEWRITERS
.BeauifulStyling
GERMAN OLYMPIA
ITALIAN OLIVETTI
-SWISS.HERMES
SMITH-CORONA
ano the
Smith-Corona Electric Portable
OUR GUARANTEE: ONE YEAR
MORRBILLS
Over 50 years of MORRILL support
NO 3-2481 314 South State

Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

I

NEW and USD
Starting as low as X12900
English bikes -3-speed hand brakes

® IYI '
.,
'
r

I

Every bike guaranteed

Professionally serviced
BEAVER'S BIKE & HARDWARE
605 Church St. NO 5-6607

liJelcomes You

to

The

University

of fflichigan

KENSINGTON PARK (COUNTRY ESTATES is
BRIGHTON 12 minutes from Kensington Park)
NEW HUDSON
Whitmore .s I
Lake SOUTH LYON FARMINGTON
EightMile (Base Line) oad FAMGTN
NORTHVILLE It
COUNTRY ESTATES
c Qo ocPLYMOUTH
(COUNTRY ESTATES is DEARBO
18 minutes from Ann Arbor) WAYNE'
ANLE. VLL
ARBOR YPSILANTI
BELLEVILLE

It's Michigan's Most Beautiful and Newest
Mobile Home Park - here's the reason why:
DETROIT
)RN

0 ~ -
Offal

"If you are within 50 miles, we'll move
your mobile home free and make no

hook-up

charges."

PAUL AND IRENE CLARK take great
pride in establishing and continuing to
improve this new concept in mobile home
communities and invite you to visit them
and see for yourself. Just follow Pontiac
Trail from Ann Arbor to Eight-Mile Road
to Country Estates... approximately 12
miles from the University of Michigan.

,v^.
- _-.-

* All sites are extra large, on rolling terrain and with homes on various
levels ... not stacked side by side... with trees,
landscaping, cement side walks and curbs.
* Each lot has a 10'x45' patio for the location of the mobile home.
* All services underground, telephones available at each home

004 TbTPY P&FTATP2

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan