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February 05, 1960 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SECTION
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Sir

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SECT ION
TW O

AGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1960

TWELVE PM

.S. Asks Nations

To Lower Postwar

Tariffs

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Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
Nations whose economies were
lamed during World War II are
being warned by the United States
to lower "temporary" postwar
tariffs.
Of the 37 nations belonging to
the General Agreement on Tariffs
and Trade (GATT), at least 23
still have barriers against Ameri-
can imports (see map). This has
helped create a situation in which
too many dollars are leaving the
United States and not enough are
coming back.
"Either we move ahead to get
rid of outmoded trade restric-
tions," Undersecretary of State C.
Douglas Dillon recently told
GATT members, "or we can ex-
pect a resurgence of protectionism
and restrictive action,"
Imposed after War
Trade restrictions were imposed
at the end of World War II when
most industrialized nations found
it necessary to import heavily

By CHARLES STAFFORD

SOUhTHI

rsn. r.". ,
BERU
CNiIE
BRAZIL=
9RU6UAT

1111U OURAFRICA

particularly consumer goods from
the United States.
Recognizing their problem, the
United States made no complaint.
In fact, it granted special tradeI
concessions and handed out bil-
lions in foreign aid,
Nations Recover
In the last few years, the indus-
trial nations have gotten back on
their feet. Today the situation is
like this:
1) United States imports from
such countries as Great Britain,
Japan, West Germany and France
have risen greatly.
2) Although United States ex-'
ports exceed imports, other spend-
ing abroad-including foreign aid
-- has caused a United States
"balance of payments" deficit.
More dollars are being paid out
overseas than are coming in.
3) Since other nations can use
dollars to buy gold from the
United States, the American gold
reserve is declining.
4) Since gold backs the cur-
rency, there is fear that a contin-
ued drain on gold reserves would
affect the stability of the dollar.
Fights Tariffs
GATT, whose membership con-
trols 80 per cent of world trade,
was designed to end discrimina-
tory practices. Nevertheless, these

23 members still discriminate
against dollar-goods imports:
Australia, Austria, Brazil, Bur-
ma, Chile, Denmark, Finland,
France, West Germany, Greece,
The Netherlands, India, Italy,
New Zealand, Norway, Rhodesia-
Nyasaland, Sweden, Turkey, Great
Britain, Uruguay, Japan, Ghana
and Malaya.
In some cases - India and
Greece are examples - the dis-
crimination is minor. In others
it is substantial.
Methods Vary
The methods of barring dollar
goods vary widely. Some are bald
quotas - Great Britain limits
American tobacco to 61 per cent
of all imported tobacco. Others
are hidden-France has high in-
ternal taxes on automobiles of
more than a certain horsepower,
and only Detroit produces these
cars.
The American campaign against;
discriminatory controls is begin-
ning to pay off.
But other countries are resist-
ing demands for an immediate re-
laxation of trade barriers. They
argue that opening markets to
American products could produce
economic or political repercus-
sions at home which might Jeo-
pardize the trend toward liberal-
ized trade.

AUSIRAIA =
IEW lEALAND

bEARBORN:
CityPlans
aam
To Build
New College
The Dearborn Board of Educa-
tion approved final plans for the
initial construction of a new com-
munity college campus recently.
Soon to be constructed are the
student center and the liberal arts,
science and administration build-
ings of the new Henry Ford Com-
munity College in Dearborn.
The new campus is adjacent to
the University's Dearborn Center,
and when completed is expected to
double the enrollment of the pres-
ent Ford College.
Space Limited

M

RIFF BOUNDARIES-This map shows the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and those which still have restrictive tariffs
ainst American Imports. These barriers have created a situation where too many dollars are leaving the United States and not enough
e entering. Because of this, the United States has warned these nations to lower their respective tariffs, which were intended to be only
nporary in order to help the country get back on its feet economically after World War II.

EVE RETT'S

DRIVE-I N

"The Home of the Famous California Delux Burger"
2280 WEST STADIUM BLVD.
Near Wrigley's NO 5-5864

fr
th
th
fa
tt
re

.4

om
heir
hese
aced
heir
han1
To

the United States to rebuild
plants. Unable to pay for
imports with exports,ethey
Ithe danger that more of
money would go abroad
they could afford.
protect their slender gold

Avoid the Rush!'
Buy Your Textbooks as Soon as You Are Classified
* Ask for Books by Course Numbers
We Have Advanced Textbook Information
Every advance sale guaranteed to be right
So r money will be cheerfully refunded.

eserves, they imposed strict con-
trols on non-essential imports.

Enrollment in the college this
year has been limited by space to
1,228 full-time and 4,592 part-
time students. The new campus is
expected to accommodate 2,600
full-time and about four times as
many part-time students.
The four buildings and the heat-
ing plant are estimated to cost
$3,632,170. Completion is set for
February, 1962.
The four-story, $1.7 million
liberal arts building will provide
46 class and lecture rooms for
such courses as English, mathe-
matics, business administration,
language and the social ,sciences.
Space is also provided for faculty
offices and a temporary library.
Science Building
The $900,000 science building is
two stories high and provides lab-
oratories,lecture rooms and offices
for both the physical and biologi-
cal sciences, practically doubling
the present facilities.
The present technical building
on the Lois Street campus will
continue to be used 'for the next
few years. This will, split classes
for some students between the two
campuses.
The $360,000 administratioi
building will house all studen1
personnel services including ad-
missions, student records, guidance
and counseling, psychological,
testing, health and general office.

,I

11

ANN ARBOR'S MOST POPULAR DRIVE-IN

State Street at North University

. . ........

Hands
of the
Giants,

CH ESTER ROBERTS
always has the funniest
VALENTINES . .

.,
~JIL
13I,
"AL

rf t'

.. u x
. ...iit Ky- fti
r'r f '
.£..wr

s'~.

|tudent Center
The student center features
multipurpose lunchroom and sti
dent lounge, plus additional sti
dent activity space and a centr
book store. Cost is estimated
$404,130.
After the construction of the
buildings and the $190,000 heatir
plant, the master plan for the ne
campus includes a technical bui14
ing, physical education buildir
speech, dramatics and televisic
area, a fine arts building and
separate library building.
Matching Funds
Construction of these faciliti
is scheduled for a later date
that the best advantage can
taken of the matching funds pr
vided by the State for the co:
-struction of community , colle
buildings

crack an

or shape.

Two locations,

too !

a missile
100,000,000 lbs.
of pressure-so delicately'
controlled that it can
be made to crack the
shell of an egg.
Use the fabulous forces:
Of present day Forging s
skills to crack the
barriers of space
weight, strength,
high temperatures

312 S. State St.-1203 S. University
Hallmark-Contemporary

Plans for the college were begu
in May of 1958 and constructic
began last year with the installa
tion of sewers, utility services am
parking facilities.
Financing of the college will I
assisted by a special three-quarte
mill tax levy in Dearborn, as we
as the State's matching fund pr<
gram and the sale of vacate
buildings.

:J."r !., * ° J}{.: '-". . t .A . .K. c

11

AoFU
Will be departing from New York to London June 15
and returning Amsterdam to New York on Sept. 1. Cost
will be approximately $300. The flight will be on a

Forge the

future,
today

EST. 18

--___.a.. s : t ;*c.. - -

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