100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 05, 1960 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ollectors Club Show

LOST STUDENTS:
Orientation Helps 400

U' Regents
Accept Fund
Donations

11

All Types of POTIONS
For Your Prescription Notions

Modern Mexican

Paintings, Drawings, Prints
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
FORSYTHE GALLERY

Nickels Arcade

Over the Post Office

Soft linesa
... I walt
Magicale b
Be s young
in this win
with its p
touches of
and embroi
A no-iron 1
batiste of E
polyester f
cotton and
White with
blue 'embro
aqua witht
sizes 32-38.

The timeless beauty of
A RTEMS
and sweet fabric
z gown in cool
atiste.
g enchantress
some gown.o
recious'* "
lace ,
dery.
blended
Dacron-
iber,
nylon.
h /
5idery,
wite.;
,
!
els Arcade -
2-2914

By RUTH EVENHUIS
Approximately 400 new students
have been on campus since Feb. 1
for orientation.
The academic part of the orien-
tation program was concentrated
in their first two days, leaving the
rest of the week for "social" or-
ientation activities.
"Social orientation," John Ross,
'61, student orientation chairman,
said, "is intended to present the
plethora of cultural, social and
athletic avenues open to every
University student."
Tests, Counselling
Monday, the students met for
general instructions followed by
college tests and counselling. Lan-
guage placement tests were sched-
uled for that evening.
The orientees completed their
counseling Tuesday and attended
physical education meetings. The
Michigan League was open to
them during the afternoon for a
get-adquainted coke break.
The first evening of social activi-
ties began Tuesday with "Col-
lege Night" at which representa-
tives from each school and college
of the University briefly discussed
their school's objectives, programs
and facilities.
Attend Mixers
After this, students attended
the International Mixer or the
Freshman and Transfer Mixer.
Bands provided the music for
these informal affairs.
The mornings of Feb. 3, 4 and
today were scheduled for regis-
tration procedures.
University Forums at which the
freshmen and transfer students,
meeting separately, were given in-
formation on counselling, extra-
curricular activities, and campus
social customs and traditions were
held Wednesday afternoon. The
discussions were led by the offi-
cers of the Union and League as
well as graduate students interest-
ed in student affairs.
Coke Dates
During the latter half of the
afternoon the Union was open tol
the new students for cokes and
conversation. The campus radio
station, WCBN, conducted an on-'
the-spot program there.
The traditional Presidents' wel-
come was scheduled for the early
part of that evening. The mens'
and womens' deans, Walter B. Rea
and Deborah Bacon, also spoke at
this time as did Student Govern-
ment Council President John
Feldkamp, '61.
Following the welcome, an All-
Campus Sing, organized by the

Wolverine Club, featured the Uni-
versity cheerleaders, Gus Stager
Coach Bill Perigo' and Captain
Terry Miller for the basketball
team, the Friars (a group from
speaking for the swimming team,
the Michigan Men's Glee Club),
and Al Young, '61, a folk-singer
and guitarist.
Campus Tours
Yesterday afternoon was divid-
ed between a Campus Close-ups
program and campus tours. Prof.
Marvin Felheim of the English de-
partment will give a humorous
close-up of campus life, and will
deliver a mock lecture, introduc-
ing students to professor types.
Campus close-ups also include
the showing of a movie about
some aspects of University life
and a speech by President Harlan
Hatcher describing the major ex-
tra-curricular activities.
A tour of the Undergraduate Li-
brary and of the outlying campus
by bus occupy the latter part of
the afternoon.
Discussions
A new feature in the orienta-
tion program is the student-fac-
ulty discussion union scheduled
for this morning. Professors Wil-

Liam Haber of the economics de-
partment, Victor H. Miesel of the
fine arts department and Marston
Bates of the zoology department
will each lead, a separate discus-
sion on a general level, in which
student participation will be en-
couraged.
"This provides an excellent op-
portunity for exchange of ideas
between the students and faculty.
We hope to show new students
that this type of discussion con-
tains the real meaning of educa-
tion, and that the faculty cer-
tainly encourages such an inter-
change of ideas," Ross said.
Union Carnival
The orientation program is cli-
maxed by Union Madness this
evening. The carnival, sponsored
by the Union Social Committee,
will i n c l u d e dancing, movies,
games and booths.
Sports Spree, held tomorrow
morning, anotherinnovation, is
designed to acquaint incoming
students with the University's
sports facilities. Students will be
able to take part in several sports
under the supervision of the Let-
terman's Club tomorrow morning.

Catnpu4 Civie,

DISARMAMENT:
Propose Arms Control,
Peace Research Agency

Trinity Hospital has given $1,-
500 for the hospital's scholarship.
The Regents accepted $1,500
from Mr. and Mrs. Lou R. Cran-
dall for the George A. Fuller
Company Award.
From the estate of Neva R.
Deardorff the Regents accepted
$1,500 to establish the Neva R.
Deardorff Loan Fund.
Mrs. Fred Fraley has given $1,-
250 and 25 shares of Diamond
Alkali Company common stock to
support neoplastic and endocrin-
ology research under the direction
of Dr. George E. Block.
Contribute Through Fund
Through the Michigan Alumni
Fund, Charles S. Neithercut has
given $1,215.53 for the Class of
1916 Law Memorial Scholarship.
The Washtenaw County Unit of
the American Cancer Society has
given $1 ,00 for the University
Hospital Field Army of the Amer-
ican Cancer Society.
Five scholarships will be finan-
ced with $1,100 received from
Foundry Educational Foundation.
Dean To Use
The Regents accepted $1,000
from Perkins & Will to be used
at the discretion of the dean of
the architecture and design col-
lege.
Midland County Cancer Society
has given $1,000 to the University
Cancer Research Institute. The
gift was made in memory of Elsa
G. Allen and Guy L. Shipps who
worked for many years for the
Midland County Cancer Society.
A grant of $1,000 for use by the
civil engineering department in
the engineering college was re-
ceived from Associated General
Contractors of America, Michigan
Chapter.
Lower Michigan Pulpwood Re-
search Association, Inc., has given
$1,000 for use by the natural
resources school.
Phone NO 2-4786
for Michigan Daily
Classified Ads

THE DIS
1210 S. University'

819 S. State

I

NO 3-.692

HI FI SALE
ANGEL RECORDS

NO 3-6131

20%/oOFF

DIAMOND NEEDLES
5.95

THE DISC SHOP

1210 S. University

NO 3-6922

$600

8 Nick
NO

A group of top scientists and ex-
perts in the field of international
relations proposed the creation of
a national peace research agen-
cy to sift scientific and technical
information on arms control.
The necessity of including Com-
munist China in any substantial
arms control program was also
brought out in a three-day con-
ference on "Disarmament and
Peace," at the University spon-
sored by Gov. G. Mennen Wil-
liams.
The scientists and diplomats
also noted that the United States
should propose "a joint agreement
among the nuclear powers to con-
duct a joint research program"
aimed at the improvement of de-
tection devices as a step toward
eventual disarmament.
They said that "the fundamen-
tal conflict between the Soviet
bloc and ourselves" could either
"end in a nuclear holocaust - or
may be resolved, slowly and pain-
fully through peaceful competi-
tion."
Calls for Agreement
Their program called for the
establishment of a w o r k a b l e
agreement, with effective con-
trols, to end testing of nuclear

weapons. This would be followed
by a cut off in the production of
atomic weapons and the reduction
of atomic stockpiles.
The conference also wanted to
strengthen international institu-
tions. International co-operation
would be brought about through
a stronger United Nations and an
effective World Court or even
"others not yet created or
imagined."
Gov. Williams noted that "al-
though joint international re-
search on testing devices may
seem like a minor point (evolved
at the conference) it could be the
key that will unlock the door of
s t a 11 e d disarmament negotia-
tions."
Major Factor
Realizing the urgency of pit-
ting such a program into effect,
the group said that "the tremen-
dous destructive capabilities of
modern weapons are a major fac-
tor in building the tensions that
can destroy our civilization by
impetuous action, by miscalcula-
tion or even by accident."
"We believe that effective arms
control is necessary to deflect the
conflict into less perilous chan-
nels, and the time to act is now."

HI FI SALE-complete catalogue
WEPSTMI NSTER

reg. $4.98

NOW $2.98 each

THE, DISC SHOP

40%/oOFF

1210 S. University

NO 3-6922

., -;o

j,,
"R
,.
.
-t.
;, , ; ..

mil

.
, "
. ,"
,, " . K ., , ,
r
f
,
(T
t
.

-- ....

I '

All YOUR CLOTHES IN 'THE DOLDRUMS
COME TO OUR
SPECIAL FIIARY EVENT

Whether
it's J-Hop or a show,
start the evening
with a delicious dinner
at WEBER'S

I

. , -

for a lift.

II

________________L'

f

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

SPICIAL PURCHASE
Fine tweed skirts, some
plaids, some flannels.
Slacks in tweeds and flan-
nels.
From one of our favorite
manufacturers. All at lovely
prices
/zoff£

'C
-'C
-'C

CAPE0I
Lucky sizes SALE
iAll sorts of interesting one
of a size Capezios in heels,
flats, leathers, fabrics.

w

4
R
r

Chestnut
) Hill

A
9~-\(

I

*

COAT NEWS
Our best classic chesterfield in
tweed lined with paisley was
65.00 now
49.88
BLOUSES

*TARTAN EVENT*
Our perennial favorite kilt
long l-B wasr 1995
short l01 wedsr.9 r
With matching tartan trimmed sweaters

I I "I

Mouth-watering, isn't it? And this
tender, juicy roast is only one of a
number of delicious selections on
our menu. Why don't you come to
Weber's this weekend and see for

loves the look of casuals like these
land plaid separates in drip dry *Ta
Slim skirt with leather - tabbed self
5.95. Double-breasted Vest, 5.95. Mc
solid color roll-sleeve shirt, 5.95 . .
mudas with self-belt in drip-dry *Ta
5.95. White cotton shirt with plaid
4.50. Dacron and cotton plaid shirt,
Plain stitched pleated skirt 10.95.
clan-plaids to c hoose from
Watch, Brown Watch, Moss Hun
Hunting Red.

mostly classic styles in oxford
cloth and a mudtitude of prints.
1/2 off

12.11

II

wsas 14.95

I

I

1!

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan