100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 24, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNtSDAY, FEBIUARY 24, 1960

TUE MICIHG IN DAILY WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24,1960

..y ,

I

ppeal Made
king Lack
)f Liberties
By The University Press Service
kn appeal for recognitior of the
;k of freedom and degrading
lation for students in Spain as
result of the dictatorship of
neral Franco and protests
ainst existing conditions have
mn 'directed to American stu-
its in a letter from the Execu-
e Committees of the Democratic
ion of Students in Spain and
National Federation of Stu-
its of Cataluna to USNSA.
[he Letter apparently came as
esult of the latest visit by-Presi-
it Dwight D. Eisenhower to
ain.
Donald Hoffman, president of
NSA, replied to the letter in
ly February, pointing out to the
~ailh students that a number
people in this country disap-
aved of Eisenhower's decision to
it Spain and feared that his
it would be misunderstood as
pport for the dictatorship of
neralissimo Franco.

COLLEGE ROUND-UP:
MSU Students Protest Loyalty Oath

By RALPH KAPLAN
EAST LANSING-Student Con-
gress at Michigan State University
has passed a resolution to protest
the disclaimer affidavit of the Na-
tional Defense Education Act.
The main reason for the resolu-
tion was opposition to the affi-
davit's "violation of our basic
principles."
In opposition to this view was
the opinion that the fact that
the affidavit is voluntary means it
is not an infringement on free
thought.
It was also pointed out that
worthy students who object to the
affidavit should be able to find
other means of financial aid.
Further points in favor of the
resolution are that the affidavit
discriminates against students, is
unclear in interpretation and is an
unnecessary measure for the
prosecution of subversives.
* * *
BERKELEY-Householders who
use the University of California's
listings after March 1 will be re-
quired not to discriminate in their
housing practices.
Only Harvard and Yale have

U

BURTON HOLMES
TRAVELOGUE

"VIENNAthe DAN BE"
Motion Pictures in Natural Color
Narrated by Andre de la Varre
THURSDAY-8:30 P.M.
kets: $1.00 (Main Floor, Reserved) 50c (Bal., Unreserved)
a Sale Daily 2.4 P.M. and Thursday 10 A.M..8:30 P.M.

I PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

HILL AUDITORIUM

NOW

DIAL
NO 5-6290

preceded California in adopting
such a resolution.
The action followed almost a
semester of agitation.
In October the National Associ-
ation for Colored People com-
plained about discriminatory hous-
ing practices to the president of
the university.
Next came a series of meetings
between the NAACP and the Dean
of Men, which culminated in a
December agreement to publicize
the University's non-discrimina-
tory ruling.
In addition, a new committee
was established to head all com-
plaints of discriminatory housing
practices.
The latest step consists of send-
ing a letter to all landlords. Only
those who sign the non-discrimi-
nation statement in the letter will
be granted a University listing.
BERKELEY - Gov. Edmund
Brown has asked the University of
California to investigate claims
made by an American Legion
member that Communist propa-
ganda was used in a student apti-
tude test.
In question was a composition
topic used In an examination
taken last May by thousands of
high school seniors for admission
to California and UCLA.
The question read:
"What are the dangers to a
democracy of a national police
organization like the FB, whicn
operates secretly and is urespon-
sive to public criticism?"
The Legion official charged in
his letter to the Governor that the
question is "a deliberate and a
vicious Communist propaganda
scheme to implant a universally
accepted party line into the minds
of our boys and girls in high
schools."
The Governor was asked to dis-
cover if an answer in favor of the
FBI would cause rejection by the
universities.
UCLA's head of the examina-
tions has welcomed the investiga-
tions. "Although the phrasing of
one of the questions In the May
1959 examinations was unfortu-
nate," he said, "certainly no Com-
munist influences were at work. I
welcome an investigation by Gov-
ernor Brown."
* . .
IOWA CITY-The University of
Iowa has passed a resolu'tion ban-
ning discrimination in fraternities
and sororities.
Une r the terms of the resolu-
tion, the Interfraternity and Pan-
hellenic Councils, in a joint ses-
sion, will outline and acceptable
program of eliminating discrimi-
natory clauses as now exist in local
or national documents.
The program is to be presented
at the next Student Council meet-
ing in March.
A program was asked for that
would be "a decinite stand with
concrete evidence that fraternities
are trying to eliminate clauses. It
must be binding."
LOS ANGELES - Platform, a
UCLA student political party, has
DANCE
ORCH ESTRAS
featuring
THE DIXIE-CATS
HUGH SCOTT
MAC DANFORTH
BOB JAMES
DICK CORRELL
BILL HENLINE
ARTI E EDWARDS
KAY MIESEN
PHIL STANLEY
plus many more

HUGH SCOTT AGENCY
1332 Geddes NO 5-5700

circulated a petition to end com-
pulsory ROTC at the university.
Platform is opposed to compul-
sory ROTC because a recent sur-
vey demonstrated that ROTC stu-
dents believed courses offered to
be below the level of education
expected of the University and
that almost all of those taking
advar-ed FOTC had planned to do
so prior to entering the Univer-
sity.
They also object to the com-
pulsory ROTC program because it
includes men hostile to the pro-
gram, thus lowering the morale of
the entire corps and ultimately
defeating its own purpose.
Compulsory ROTC also meets
with objection because under the
Selective Service Act of 1948, the
training given in the, compulsory
ROTC program is repeated in sub-
sequently required basic training.
They also feel that the Univer-
sity of California is supported by
public taxation and any qualified
student should be allowed to en-
roll. The conscientious objector
cannot now enroll in the Univer-
sity because ROTC is compulsory.
This means a person can be ex-
cluded from the university due to
his moral or religious beliefs.

Fraternity
Counselors
To Give Aid ,
Rush advisors for fraternity
rushees will be available in Rm. 32
of the Michigan Union from 2 un-
til 5 p.m. Monday through Friday,
February 29 through March1.
These advisors will have infor-
mation about individual fraterni-
ties, such as grade point averages,
social schedules, and finances -.
these will be shown to the rushee
to help him make his choice.
There will be a counselor from
each fraternity. Since counselors
are to advise on an impartial basis.
they are not allowed to reveal
their specific fraternities.
"Our experience in the past is
that the rushees do not realize the
importance of visiting an advisor
and obtaining the available infor-
mation, regardless of whether the
information required is of a gen-
eral or of a specific nature," How-
ard Miller, '61E, IFC rushing
chairman, said.
"We urge every rushee to take
at least five minutes of his time to
stop and see a counselor, even if
just to glance through the infor-
mation.

By SANDRA JOHNSON
Special To The Daily
JACKSON - "The majority of
textbooks we use and the majority
of the professors we listen to, ex-
pound the democratic, pseudo-
liberal philosophy of government
handouts for everyone and less in-
dividual freedom for anyone."
This opinion was expressed by
Jim Mack, chairman of the Mid-
western Federation of College

LEADERS SPEAK:
Responsibilities of YR's
Stressed at Convention

Dean Asks High Schools
To Give Foundations

Glamorous academic Innova-
tions cannot give strength to the
college curriculum, Dr. John G.
Palfrey, dean of Columbia College,
asserted yesterday.
Higher education needs "the
fundamentals of accuracy, clarity.
and precision of thought and ex-
pression," the educator said in his
first annual report since he be-
came dean of the college in 1958.
He asked that the high schools
provide more of the "foundations"
so that the colleges can devote
themselves to philosophies.
In line with this policy, Dr. Pal-
frey announced' that, starting in
the fall of 1962, the college would
require three years of high school
work in one foreign language for
admission.
The trend is a combination of a
return to the rigor and discipline
of the nineteenth century, without
the narrow limitations of the cur-
riculum of that era, he said.
Expansion Weighed
Dean Palfrey also forecast the
possible reconsideration of a 1956
faculty vote against a major ex-
pansion of the college. The re-
appraisal is related to the expan-
sion of the engineering program,
he said.
Dr. Palfrey cautioned that the
return to a more.demanding men-
tal discipline must not "lead the
colleges to discard twentieth cen-
tury developments, including the
range and the initiative produced
by the elective system or the
breadth of encounter provided by
general education courses."
The "current ferment" in edu-
cation, he said, has had two im-
mediate effects.
, Pass the Buck
First, it has led to a certain
amount of academic buck-passing,
with the graduate schools blaming
the colleges, the colleges accusing
the high schools and the high
schools pointing a finger at the
elementary schools, w h e n e v e r
somebody complains about inade-
quate English preparation, for in-
stance.
Second, he said, "the pursuit of
excellence" has given rise to new
opportunities for students with
outstanding achievements. As a
result, new "honors courses" have
been introduced even in the fresh-
man year.

You cai't put out the humn fires -Utbr.i .
Sthat burn in--

/Icro44 Caw~pu4

1

Richard BulonlaRIb ara Rush
Jack Carson i. ic uoja n
A WARNER BROS. K-rovm TECNNICOLOR*
Pu@ .,..,,..
HENRY JONESs en ,, MILt.TON SPERLINGaPHIUPYORDANPai 'rby MILTON SPERUNG
Soon: "SUDDENLY LAST SUMMER"

'1

I DRAMATIC ART CENTER

presents

ACTORS' WORKSHOPS

Lyman B. Kirkpatrick, Jr., in-
spector general of the Central In-
telligence Agency, will speak on
"Central Intelligence and the Na-
tional Security" at 4:10 p.m. today
in Aud. A, Angell Hall,
The lecture is open to the public.
Ortega y Gasset ..
Josh Ortega y Gasset, Spanish
philosopher and author of the
"Revolt of the Masses," will be dis-
cussed in relation to his metaphy-
sical and sociological ideas by
Prof. Juan Lopez-Morillas at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow in the Rackham
Amphitheatre.
Prof. Lopez-Morillas is a pro-
fessor of Spanish at Brown Uni-
versity and a lecturer at many
other Eastern schools. He has
written on Unamuno, Ortega and
other Spanish philosophers of the
nineteenth and twentieth cen-
turies.
Math Seminar . . .
The mathematics department
and the Bureau of Appointment
will sponsor a panel discussion on,
career opportunities in mathe-
nm. pics and statistics.
The panel, scheduled for 4:10
p.m. tomorrow in therMultipurpose
room of the Undergraduate Li-
brary, will discuss mathematics
instruction at the secondary and
college levels, pure mathematics in
research and development, its re-
lation to engineering and business
administration, and its use in data
processing.
Art Lecture . ..
Prof. Ben Karp of the State
University College at New Paltz,
New York, will speak on "Nine-
teenth Century Scroll Saw Work"
at 4:10 p.m. Friday in the Archi-
tecture Auditorium.
Prof. Karp is interested in scroll
saw and art-shinkle decoration as
a phase of American design his-
tory. During the last several years
he has mad many photographs of
the fast-disappearing houses on
which this type of "carpenter
sculpture" appears.
An exhibition of his photo-
graphs from the Hudson Valley
area will be on display at the time
of the lecture.

Young Republicans, while he was t
speaking at the College Y-R's statei
convention last Friday.
"I am not criticizing your pro-
fessors or your textbook writers.
"In a way, I am oomplimenting
them, for they are doing a better1
job of selling their program on thet
college campuses than we Republi-
cans are.E
"It is the responsibility of thes
Y-R's," Mack explained, "to pre-t
sent our party-its issues, its view
point, and its deep interest in the
future welfare of young people."
Lawrence B. Lindemer, chair-t
man of the Republican State'Cen-{
tral Committee, enthusiasticallyi
predicted- that 1960 would be a1
great year for the party.I
Later in the evening, Rep. Alvin
M. Bentley (R-Mich.) described
the need to eliminate. "irrespon-
sible" spending in the government.
"Future taxpayers and citizens,"
he warned, "will have to bear the
birden for many years to come."
On Saturday, Peter McPherson
from Michigan State University
was elected state chairman for the
coming year. Jo McKenna, '62,
head of the University's delegation
was named recording secretary.
Ann Arbor
Patrolman{
Leavees Beat'i
The Ann Arbor patrolman who1
wore police badge number one re-1
tired recently after thirty-five
years of loyal service.
In the spring of 1925, Benjamin
H. Ball became a rookie on the
Ann Arbor Police Force and has
walked a beat ever since. Bal had
served under five police chiefs and
seen a complete turnover of police
personnel but politely declined
any offers for promotion. A pro-
motion wouldhave meant office
duty, away from the beat and the.
people.
Ball's main beat was on S. State
Street beyond the main campus.
During his years of police work
Ball encountered bootleggers,
drunks, thieves, frolicsome stu-
dents, and traffic offenders,
"You've got to realize that most
of the time we meet people at
their worst," he said. "I guess I
never met anyone I hated."
"I knew that first day, this was
what I wanted," Ball said. "I've
never changed my mind. I guess
some people are born to police
work or teaching or bricklaying.
"No other job on earth is like
police work. With this you've got
to take the job home with you,
live with it, love it," he related.
"I always did. And I was -never
unhappy."

Dr. Palfrey said well-planned.
honors work, especially for solidly
prepared students, was sound edu
cation, but cautioned:
"There is a danger that colleges
may rush into honors programs
because they are fashionable and
waste their time and energy on an
ambitious super-structure of hon-
ors work at the expense of the
necessary foundation. A primary
assignment of Columbia College is
to make sure it is providing this
foundation before offering ad-
vanced work that assumes it."
Urges Firm Stand ',
Dr. Palfrey also urged the lib-
eral arts college to "stand firm
against pressures to consider its
assignment in terms of planned
results and quotas of human man-
power to be trained for specialties
in current demand."I
He called on the colleges to con-
centrate on "science's broader im-
plications in the world today,"
while asking the high schools to
make students "literate in mathe-
matics and at least one science."
Dr. Palfrey warned, however,
that the colleges must not "simply
Issue orders to the schools from
on high." He called for coopera-
tion and joint planning including
the writing of textbooks.
No Fighting
Nor must the college and the
university fight each other, he
added. At Columbia, he said,
"teaching in the college is no
longer regarded as a tour of duty
for a rising professor t be com-
pleted as soon as possible."
"Members of the college faculty,
as they gain tenure or become
members of the graduate facul-
ties, continue to teach two-thirds
or at least one-third of their timea
in the college," he said.
(Copyright New York Times 1960.
Reprinted by special permission.)
Seats Filled
On Airflight
The Michigan Union Airfiight to
Europe has been sold out, accord-
ing to Michael Turoff, '61BAd.,
chairman of the Union Student
Affairs Committee.
"We are, nowever, still trying
to get another airplane," Turoff
said. "There are about 50 people
on the waiting list for this flight
and we would like to take care of
them if we could."
Turoff said the problem was in
finding a major airline with the
proper facilities still available. "In
the past, we have had trouble
with the smaller airlines," he said.
"Departures were not prompt and
the service was poor."
This year's arfiight is on the
Scandinavian Airway System and
leaves Idlewild Airport in New
York for London on June 15, re-
turning Sept. 1 from Amsterdam.
Camp Alumni
Form Group
The newly-proposed National
Music Camp Alumni Club formed
an Ann Arbor chapter last week-
end.
Seventy former students, staff
members and faculty members of
the famous Interlochen, Michigan
music and arts center held an in-
formal reunion at the Union.
Speakers highlighting the occa-
sion were Prof.. Joseph . Maddy
of the music school and president
of the National Music Camp, and
Vice-President Don Gillis.

beginning

City Council
Considers
Zoning Plan
The City Council, concerned re-
cently with city zoning procedures,
may have come up with a plan to
improve them.
Meeting in an informal working
session Monday, Council members
considered the establishment of a
Council committee to which cer-
tain zoning questions could be
referred.
To Avoid Shortcomings
° The aim of such action would be
to avoid shortcomings in present
public hearing procedures.
Although no action was taken by
the Council last night, a formal
measure is being drawn up.
Under the suggested plan, zoning
requests for which the Planning
Commission either recommended
denial or recommended denial with
an accompanying recommendation
for a type of tzoning different from
what the petitioner asked would be
referred to the proposed Council
committee.
Practice Explained
Under present practice, the
Council can simply concur in a
denial recommendation of the
commission, with no public hear-
ing being held. It can also concur
in a denial recommendation and
go ahead with ordinance steps on
a recommended substitute zoning.
The only public hearing guaran-
teed now is one that is part of the
zoning ordinance procedure, after
the first reading of a proposed
ordinance and prior to final action.
Opportunity Given
the committee plan were.
adopted, petitioners whose requests
would ordinarily not reach the
formal hearing stage or whose
land might be recommended for
a different type of zoning, would
have an opportunity for a hearing
before the Council committee.
The committee would then make
its own recommendation to the
Council.
A committee with a revolving
membership of three is Manned.
F ~ DIAL Nt3 S-64 T
Never Before Has The
Camera Dared To Focus. So
Intimately, So Revealingly!

Feb. 25 and. every

I

Thursday

41

ICB Needs
Radio Staff
The Student Government Coun-
cil's International Coordinating
Board has several positions open
for the staff of its radio program
"World," Dietrich Bergmann, '60E,
board chairman, announced.
"World" is broadcast Sundays at
11:45 a.m. over WCBN, the cam-
pus network. It is a fifteen minute
program concerned with political,
economic and social conditions in
the homelands of University stu-
dents. This year the concentration
is on Latin America.
People are needed to announce
and write articles for the program.
Students to publicize the show and
to contact students from the coun-
tries are also needed.
"Anyone interested in working
with "World" or wishing more in-
formation can call the SGC offices
in the SAB between 3 and 5 p.m.
during the week." Bergmann said.
Receive Works
For Annual
Art Exhibition
Entries for the thirty-seventh
annual Ann Arbor Artists Exhi-
bition will be received at the Rack-
ham Galleries from 6 to 9 p.m.
tomorrow and Friday," Kingsley
Calkins, chairman of the Ann
Arbor Art Association exhibition
committee, announced recently.
Original paintings, drawings,
sculpture, graphic arts or crafts
may be submitted, and all work
must be framed and fitted with
wire for hanging.
Artist: may submit a total of
two pictures, or two craft works
in addition to one painting or
craft work in the exhibit which
opens March 3.
Exhibitors must be members of
the association, but membership
may be obtained when works are
submitted.
The exhibition will be judged by
Prof. David Mitchell of Wayne
State University's fine arts depart-
ment.
Further information may be ob-
tained by calling the association.

I

I

TheDBVEIS
NEXT
Number 2 of Russian
Cultural Exchange Films
"CiRCUS
STARS"
*a

x

A

7:30-9:30

P.M.

Lane Hall,

Second

Floor

____________*

TO own
r/
.f i,

(7/

t
r
t
t
3
i
Z
a
T!
a

DJIAL NO 2-6264
ENDING TONIGHT
TH E "-MOST
DIABOLICAL
MURDERER OF
ALL TIME!
* THURSDAY
ROD STE IGER
EDW. G. ROBINSON
THvm

Stereo 60116

infree i~b
This is Sarah Vaughan,
launched by the Basie Band-
and singing what comes natu-
rally! Soaring C-ward, octave
hopping, wailing like a horn.
Listen-to her ad-lib stylings
of "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes"
"Stardust'"; "No 'Count
Blues"; Six others.
The New Sound of Leisure-
best
Interpreted
on

Monaural 20441

a * I
6A,((Pj tll

- Eu~r

SMOOTH

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street
TONIlGHT

11

1 111 r

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan