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December 12, 1963 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-12-12

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1~
THURSDAY DECEMBER12, 1963^ I

10 IF! - .- t= , ,

Question

Oswald

Evidence

Whi ppie Gives Analysis
Of AEC Safety Rules

n

tC

Q

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Following
are excerpts from an analysis
of the published evidence against
Lee Harvey Oswald, the accused
assassin of President John F.
Kennedy.
(In yesterday's Daily appear-
ed portions of the study, com-
piled by Prof. Staughton Lynd
of Spelman College and Jack
Minnis, which questioned why
the late President was shot in
the front of the throat if Os-
wald supposedly was firing from
behind and questioned the of fi-
cial explanation that three shots
were fired in five seconds with
extreme accuracy from about

\75e-

100 yards away at a target mov-
ing 25 miles an hour.
(Today's account puts forth a
thesis that four shots, instead of
three as often reported, were
fired; cites discrepancies in ac-
counts of Oswald's actions after
the shooting; and questions po-
lice and FBI handling of the
case.
(Prof. Lynd obtained a doc-
torate in history at Columbia
University. Minnis, now of At-
lanta, is a former graduate stu-
dent of Tulane University.
(Their document has been
sent to Chief Justice Earl War-
ren and the four congressional

U' Obtains Portrait

members of his investigatory
committee. It has also been for-
warded to the Justice Depart-
ment.)
Number of Shots...
Then there is the matter of the
bullets. There is general agree-
ment among the witnesses and
newspaper accounts that three
shots were fired.
Typical is Sen. Ralph Yarbor-
ough's description, quoted here
from the Washington Post of Nov.
23: "I heard three loud explosions
that sounded like shots from a
deer rifle. You could smell pow-
der."
Yet there appear to be four bul-
lets involved. In the New York
Times of Nov. 25, Fred Powledge's
story from Dallas lists as part of
the evidence supporting the Os-
wald - Schoolbook - Depository-
Mannlicher-Carcano theory: "A
bullet that Secret Service men re-
moved from a stretcher at Park-
land Hospital after the shooting,
and two bullet fragments removed
from the presidential automobile
matched bullets fired by the rifle
(FBI) agents found inside the
(warehouse)."
Times Story
Powledge cites Gordon Shank-
lin, FBI agent in charge in Dal-
las, as his source of information.
This it would appear accounts for
two bullets.
In the Times of Nov. 27, John
Herbers' story from Dallas says:
"Three shots are known to have
been fired. Two hit the President.
One did not emerge. Dr. Kemp
Clark, who pronounced Mr. Ken-
nedy dead, said one struck him
at about the necktie knot. 'It rang-
ed downward and did not exit,' the
surgeon said."
Thus there is the bullet from
the stretcher, the bullet which
was found fragmented in the car,
and the bullet that did not exit
from the President.
Fourth Bullet
An AP dispatch from Dallas in
the Atlanta Constitution of Nov.
23 quotes Dr. Robert R. Shaw, at-
tending physician for Gov. Con-
nally: "(The Governor) seems to
have been struck by just one bul-
let . . . (The bullet) entered the
back of his chest and moved out-
ward . . . It emerged from his
chest and struck his wrist and
thigh . . . The bullet is still in his
leg."
Now we have the stretcher bul-
let, the fragmented bullet, the bul-
let that remained in the President,
and the bullet in the governor's
leg.
(Editor's Note: The report then
notes the discrepancies as to
where the bullet on the stretcher
came from and how it came to be
on the stretcher.)'
Another fact we find puzzling ls
that apparently the two bullets
with the cloudiest pedigree are the
ones that link the shooting to the
gun the investigators finally set-
tled on from a field of three or
more.
Powledge's story of the 25th,
quoted above, states that the
stretcher bullet and the fragment-
ed bullet matched bullets fired by
FBI men from the rifle found in-
side the building. The rifle was
found early in the afternoon of
Nov. 28. So were the two bullets.
They were in the possession of the
Dallas police and the FBI, presum-
ably, from then on. The gun was
identified to newsmen variously as
an Enfield and a Mauser. Then,
sometime on Nov. 23, the identity
of the rifle changed. It became a
Mannlicher-Carcano. We do not
know whether it is the custom of
Italian rifle-makers to leave their
names off their products, so that
they cannot be identified immedi-
ately. But, if so, why the false
identification?
And we do know that the more
damage done to the surface of the
bullet, the more dubious becomes
the accuracy of laboratory com-
parison with other bullets to de-
termine which gun of a given

make it was fired from, even if
the make of the gun can be de-
termined.
Thus the identification of the
gun that supposedly fired the as-
sassination bullet seems to rest
primarily, not on the fragmented
bullet, but on a bullet allegedly
found by a Secret Service man on
a stretcher in Parkland Hospital,
Dallas, after the President was
shot.
After the Shooting". . .
We will remark on one other
aspect of the case against Oswald.
Dallas District Attorney Wade of-
fered to newsmen and to the pub-

LEE HARVEY OSWALD
... in his defense
lic, as one of the links in the
chain of evidence against Oswald,
the fact that Oswald went to his
home in Oak Cliff, changed his
clothes hurriedly, and left (Wade's
Nov.n24 news conference as print-
ed in the New York Times, Nov.
26).
According to a UPI dispatch
datelined Dallas in the Atlanta
Journal Nov. 23, "Mrs. R. C. Rob-
erts, who works for the Johnsons
(from whom Oswald rented a room
in Oak Cliff), said that at about
12:45 p.m. (Dallas time) Friday
she had just learned that Mr.
Kennedy was shot. In rushed Os-
wald, 'On the dead run,' she said.
'He ran to his room, came running
back with a gray zipper jacket
and out the door'."
DescentI
The assassin's bullets were fired
between 12:30 and 12:31 p.m.
(Dallas time). Oswald supposedly
fired them from the sixth floor of
the building where he worked.
Then, supposedly, he hid the ri-
fle behind some books and packing
cases and made his way to the sec-
ond floor of the building. Roy S.
Truly, manager of the building,
and a policeman ran into the
building immediately after the
shots were fired.
"The two nen scrambled up the
See ATLANTANS, Page 8

By ROBERT SHLIFER
"If it could be found out how
other countries are handling
safety regulations and how these
regulations are working, one could
hope to change the Atomic Energy
Commission's mind with regard to
their restrictive standards," Prof-
G. Hoyt Whipple of the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
said recently.
"The motivation for this study
comes from the concern that I and
others have felt over the fact that
the AEC is doing the United States
a disservice by making nuclear
safety regulations so detailed,
legal and restrictive," said Prof.
Whipple.
He asserted that radiation
safety men are "so ivorried about
legal compliance that they have
no time for safety. The AEC in-
spection system encourages this."
Traveling Man
Prof. Whipple spent four weeks
in England lastsyear, and one
week in Sweden and two weeks in
France this year. He talked not
only to the ministries in charge
of these regulations but also to
the people directly concerned, the
engineers who build and design
reactors, the people operating
them, and the insurance com-
panies who must pay injured
workers.
All three countries handle nu-
clear safety problems as they
handle industrial problems, using
the same agencies. In England,
for example, inspectors are sent
out to make sure standards are
maintained. They have the author-
ity to approve something that is
not stated in the letter of the law.
This is in contrast to regula-
tions in this country, which specify
that no one has the power to in-
terpret laws except the general

counsel of the AEC, Prof. Whipple
said.
British Reactors
England has made as much-or
more-use of nuclear material
than this country has, including
building a number of power re-
actors.
France has an extensive pro-
gram of reactors also, while Swe-
den's is more recent.
These countries are proceeding
more slowly in their regulationI
program, believing that regula-
tions should follow practice; while
in the United States practice is
set by making regulations, he
pointed out.
While statistics on injuries in
nuclear research are hazy, it is
known that this field is extremely
safe. No one has been killed by an
accident in any of the three Euro-
pean countries, according to Prof.
Whipple.
Radioactive Wastes
As a specific example of the
care taken to protect the public,
Prof. Whipple mentioned the dis-
position of radioactive wastes.
Highly radioactive substances
are put in carefully watched un-
derground tanks. Low level gases
are released into the air and
liquids into streams and seas, all
according to rigid self-imposed
safety standards.
Standards set up by the Inter-
national Commission on Radio-
logical Health greatly exceed the
minimum requirements, P r o f.
Whipple added.
%r r
EXPERT
AlTERATIONS AND REPAIRS

ROSALIND RUSSELL
R1

I

December 16 & 17

7:00 P.M.

EXAM WEEK MOVIES

UNION BALLROOM

FREE

'"

PLAYING
THROUGH
SATURDAY

i1Mm

DIAL
8-64116

from
FOLLETT'S
State St. a N. University

acclaim for "THE LEOPARD"
"A stunning visualization."
BOSLEY CROWTHER, N.Y. TIMES
"'The Leopard' is remarkable at
many levels. At the technical
level . . . At the histrionic level
At the literary level ... At the
philosophic level."
TIME MAGAZINE
"A production of serious film art.N.O
ARCHER WINSTEN; N.Y. POST,
"A sumptuously handsome film."A
HOLLIS ALPERT, SAT. REVIEW
1ST PRIZE WINNER "BEST FILM"
1968 CANNES INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 4
AtSO STARRING
M44uE4 rRE~tgY UHINO COUWRO
ALAfINDLON CLAICARDI A[ OMARD IVISCONTI DE~vxE

r,

THE LATE POET--Above is a portrait of the late poet Robert
Frost purchased by the University from Ann Arbor artist Leon A.
Makielski who painted it when Frost was poet-in-residence at the
University in 1923 and 1925. The portrait is on display at the
University Alumni Memorial Hall.

}
mf
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u :;

't COIFFURE STUDIO
L.t usstyle a special
holiday hai rdo for you.
Will Accept Evening Appointments
CORNER OF 5th and WILLIAMS
only 3 blocks from campus,
CALL: 663-7987

'R&v~9Ifl

k

NEW FACILITIES IN YPSILANTI-ANN ARBOR AREA
5 N. Hamilton af Michigan, Ypsilanti
PHONE HU 3-1894.
1 p.m.-7 p.m. Friday
ID 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday
Detroit Blood Service, Inc.

Across
Campus,
A carillon recital of special
Christmas music will be played at
7:30 p.m. today,. preceding the
public concert of the University
choir and orchestra.
The program will open with.
Russian Orthodox bell music play-
ed as a trio by Ennis Fruhauf,
John Ellis and Percival Price, fol-
lowed by a variety of Christmas'
numbers.
Announce Service .. .
The General Library science li-
brary will be open to students who
require course reserve materials, it
was announced yesterday.
To Stage 'Ars Nova' ...
In cooperation with the English
department, the Student Labora-
tory Theatre will present Donald
Bohelen's "Ars Nova" at 4:10
p.m. today in the Arena Theatre,
Frieze Bldg.
The play is a comedy adaptation
of "La Boheme" and "Gianni
Schicchi" to their modern equiva-
lent-the beatnik haunts of New
York City. Admission is free.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Christian Science Org., Testimony
Meeting, Dec. 12, 7:30 p.m., 528R SAB.
(Meeting on exam peparation imme-
diately follows regular meeting.)
Cinema Guild, Film: Val Lewton's
"The Cat People," Dec. 12 & 13, 7 & 9
p.m., Architecture Aud.
Congr. Disc. E & R Student Guild,
Mid-week Worship, Dec. 12, 12:10 p.m.,
Douglas Memorial Chapel.

TONIGHT at &3...
UNIVERSITY CHOIR & ORCHESTRA
PROF. MAYNARD KLEIN conducting-
GABRIELI: "Angelits Ad P astores"
BACH: Excerpts from "Christmas Oratorio"

DIAL
2-6264 ..

Shows Start at
1:00-2:50-4:55

III

BRUCKNER:
' HONEGER:

"Mass in F Minor," Kyrie, Gloria
Une Cantate dle Noel"

*Ann Arbor Premiere Performances
HILL AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION FREE
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CONCERT

$5 00 Rh Positive-

.

$ .00-$10.00 Rh Negative

Ticket refunds for
'(HE IKADQ U
By mail to: IN PERSON AT:
Gilbert & Sullivan Soc. Lobby Box Office
Student Activities Bldg. Student Activities Bldg.
Ann Arbor 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
Enclose tickets, stamped Thursday, Dec. 12 ONLY
self-addressed envelope
ALL REQUESTS FOR REFUNDS
MUST BE RECEIVED BY DEC. 13
Cancelled performances will NOT be rescheduled
v
t)< <). YOl OG ' -C-7 |--y<--->C<--C7<-->0---O<"- >0<"" -r< ,

BLOD DONORS URGENTLY NEEDED
(18-2, ;must have parents written permission)

TODAY: 4-:A p.0 .
Areno Theatre

Promptly
Frieze Building

-KAMflAdSO JOANBLACKMAN
JAMES GREGORY ,P ~UURAM JOEY HEATRERTON

an Original Play
JARS NOVA-CIRCA 1960
,by Donald Bohlen
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre-
- in co-operation with Professor Rowe's
Playwriting course in the Deparment of English
ADMISSIQN FREE

----

-.

DIAL 5-6290

I

mere
the DOYS
are and
the girl
are... -
SPRIES
-W m ...-m U

I

.,

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