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December 04, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-12-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. DECE;ITSER 4, 196.'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 4. 19EI~

F: .

PROFESSIONAL TRA INING:
Organize Social Work Program

Walker Gets
Top A ward
For Studies

FEWER BELOW 'C':
Academic Dropout Rate
Shows Decline in LSA

TONIGHT at 8: FRITZ A. ROTHSCHILD
Rabbi, Author and Lecturer
speaks on the philosophy of
ABRAHAM JOSHUA HESCHEL
sponsored by the Bet Midrash of
the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America at the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill St.

Plans for a two-year specialized
program of professional graduate
education in community organiza-
tion were announced recently by
the School of Social Work.
The program is being partially
supported from a grant to the
University from the National In-
stitute of Mental Health, accord-
ing to Dean Fedele F. Fauri of the
social work school.
Both concentrated academic
work and field instruction leading
to a Master of Social Work degree
will be offered, he noted.
Many Areas
Professional preparation for
work in a variety of areas will be
provided. These include work in
juvenile delinquency prevention
and control, race relations, urban
renewal, community welfare plan-
ning councils, neighborhood de-
velopment, community mental
health, school-community rela-
tions and federated fund raising.
The program will be under the
direction of Prof. Jack Rothman of
the social work school. He will be
assisted by Prof. Fred M. Cox of
the University of California, who
will assume a full-time faculty
position with the University in
January.
Prof. Rothman noted that com-
munity organization practice dif-
fers from social casework in that
Colgate Votes
'New Semester
Faculty members at Colgate
University recently approved three
major changes in its undergrad-
uate education program, including
a shorter semester.
A curriculum change requiring
a shift from the credit-hour to the
course load system has also been
adopted. Under this plan, students
must take four courses in each of
two semesters of 14 weeks.
Semesters presently require stu-
dents to carry five courses for a
16-week period.
A third change requires students
to participate in a special studies
period of four weeks during Jan-
uary.
These changes, which will be
implemented in Fall, 1964, are the
first structural revisions at Colgate
in 18 years.rThe board of trustees
gave its approval to the plans last
June.

from individuals with pre-profes-i
sional community experience. Both
men and women are eligible for
candidacy in the program.
Applicants will be evaluated on
the basis of academic achievement
and personal potentialities for
community organization practice.
Scholarships and grants will be
available under the program, in-
dluding stipends from the NIMH.
Graduateassistantships may also
be obtained.
Leary Predicts
Faster Rate
Of City Growth
City Planner Robert M. Leary
observed last week that "pressures
may be building up" which could
cause Ann Arbor's rate of popula-
tion growth to overtake previous
long-range forecasts.
The factors cited were future in-
creases in University enrollment
and the accompanying growth of
faculty and staff, growth of pres-
ent local research industries, num-
ber of employees and growth of
new research industries which will
locate in the city in the near
future.
Using a graph correlating over-
all city population figures and
University figures for the past 60
years with the recently quoted
University estimates, the City
Planning Commission concludes
that the over-all city population
could hit 110,000 by 1980.

(Continued from Page 1)
Prof. Edward L. Walker of the --------- --- --
psychology department has been missal. These decisions are the
awarded a Research Career Award most difficult to appeal success-
from the United States Public fully. In 1962-63, 401 students met
Health Service, this fate, 257 less than in 1961-62.
This is one of the top honors Requested Not To Register also
in the field of health-related sci- leads to withdrawal, but first "we
ences and it will enable Prof. hope to bring in the student and
Walker to devote his time almost get at the facts behind his aca-
exclusively to research. The award demic problems," Dean Robertson
is made on the basis of a nation- said.

DEAN FEDELE FAURI
. field instruction
it takes place in a community
setting and is geared to social
change, rather than to individual
clinical therapy.
Integrate Work
He pointed out that the new
program will stress integration of
community organization practice
with social science content. Op-
portunities for additional advanc-
ed study leading to a Ph.D. degree
in social work and one of the
social sciences-sociology, social
psychology, economics or psy-
chology-are also available.
Prof. Rothman encouraged in-
quiries about the program from
undergraduate students as well as

wide competition.
Prof. Walker's research has
made significant contributionsto
the basic study of memory storage
and has led to some possible
breakthroughs in the field.
Ability to Recall
Results of his research have
shown that what one learns un-
der emotional stress is harder to
remember immediately than a
week later. Conversely, things one
stores in his memory under rela-
tively unemotional conditions are
easily recalled immediately after
storage but rapidly forgotten.
This suggests that the human
memory is not stored instantan-
eously. Permanent storage appears
to require a substantial period of
time for the fixation process to
take place.
"Prof. Walker has played the
central role in developing our un-
dergraduate program in psychol-
ogy that has been acknowledged
nationally as a model of teaching
and research integration," Prof.
Wilbert J. McKeachie, chairman of
the psychology department, com-
mented.
Encourages Research
"Since the new undergraduate
curriculum established under Prof.
Walker's leadership is now in full
swing, we feel it of the utmost im-
portance that he be given the op-
portunity to continue his re-
search," he pointed out.
Prof. Walker joined the Uni-
versity faculty as a psychology in-
structor in 1947. He became an as-
sistant professor in 1948 and an
associate professor in 1950. He was
promoted to a full professor in
1956.
He received his bachelor of arts
in 1938 and his master of arts in
1940 from Indiana University, and
his doctor of philosophy in 1947
from Stanford University.

LITERARY COLLEGE
Percentage of Academic
Dropouts
1958-59 7.7
1959-60 7.2
1960-61 5.9
1961-62 6.7
1962-63 5.1
Percentage of Academic
Dropouts for Fall Semester
Freshmen
1958-59 10.4
1959-60 9.6
1960-61 8.9
1961-62 8.9
1962-63 7.0
These "NTR's" are given to
students already on probation
whose grade-point for the semes-
ter attained the minimum C
average, but didn't exceed it
enough to raise their overall
grade-point to the required C
level. Also, students not on pro-
bation whose grade-point falls
"catastrophically" or shows a
long-run decline may receive
NTR's, he explained.
In addition, NTR's are given to
students doing badly in one field
-language, for example-so that
they would lack the distribution
requirements for graduation, Dean
Robertson added.
C;lose Petitioning
For SGC Tribunal
Petitioning for Student Govern-
ment Council's Membership Tri-
bunal closed yesterday. Those who
have submitted petitions are:
Thomas Brown, '66L; Bart Fore-
man, '64; William Hall, '64E; Alan
Sager, '65L, and Meredith Spencer,
'65. Interviewing will take place
at 9 p.m. tomorrow.

The number of NTR's given rose
slightly last year. The 1962-63
figure was 447; the 1961-62 figure,,
436.
-Probation is imposed the first
semester a student's overall grade-
point slips below C. 240 students T
achieved this dubious distinction
last year, 62 less than in 1961-62.
-Probation Continued is the
status of students who have been
on probation but are allowed to,
remain even though their overall
average has not yet risen to a C.
273 students fell into this category
last year, 48 more than in 1961-62.
-Freshman Probation, a class
by itself, involves students whose
first-semester freshman grades
fall below C. 393 freshmen met
this fate last year, 11 less than in
1961-62.
Grand Totals
The total number of students
below C average last year as of
last spring was 1062, or 12.6 per
cent of the college's enrollment.
In 1961-62, 1119 missed this mark
-a total of 13.7 per cent of the

THE MICHIGAN UNION
presents
JAZZ andCIDER
featuring the
20-piece U of M JAZZ BAND
directed by Bruce Fischer
SATURDAY, DEC. 7 ... 4:00 P.M.
NORTH LOUNGE FREE CIDER
UNION FREE ADMISSION

4

I'

Across Campus

Prof. E. 0. Wilson of Harvard
University will speak on "Chemical
Communication Among Animals"
at 4 p.m. today in Rm. 1400
Chemistry' Bldg.
Recital .. .
Prof. Louis Stout of the music
school will give a wind instrument
recital at 8:30 p.m. today in
Rackham Aud.
Tutors . .
The Michigan Union is seeking
tutors for its tutoring service.

Prospective tutors, who may set
their own rates, should inquire
from 3-5 p.m. today or tomorrow
at the Union's second floor stu-
dent offices.
Farce ...
The University Players will pre-
sent Oscar Wilde's farce "The Im-
portance of Being Earnest" at 8
p.m. today in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre. Additional performances
will be presented tomorrow, Friday
and Saturday.
Hatcher Tea.
University President and Mrs.
Harlan Hatcher will hold their
annual Christmas tea at 4 p.m.
today in their home. The tea will
honor Director of University Resi-
dence Halls Eugene Haun.
Students-Faculty
Call 662-8871
for
Cihea uir
Program Information

student body.
The college last spring lost 214
of its students, or 2.6 per cent, for
academic reasons; in 1961-62, 254,
or 3.1 per cent, were dismissed.
Dropout figures for the present
semester-with its tighter sched-
ule which some claim is placing
greater pressure on University
students-are not yet available.
Thus, whether or not the trend
toward academic longevity will
continue remains to be seen.
Colleges Offer
New Courses
New ideas in honors courses
have been put into practice at the
University of Oregon and the Uni-
versity of Colorado for the 1963-64
academic year.
Among these is a course entitled
"Science and Society," taught by
a chemistry instructor at Oregon.
The object of the course is to re-
late scientific thought and action
to other areas of intellectual and
human endeavor.
Guest lecturers have occasional-
ly been drawn from the Oregon
campus and other universities as
well as from government and in-
dustry.
"Readings in Problems and Pros-
pects for Peace" has received en-
thusiastic acceptance at the Uni-
versity of Colorado. An interdis-
ciplinary course revolving around
discussions of well-known books
concerned with peace, it was insti-
tuted with the belief that the
problem of achieving peace has
not yet received sufficient atten-
tion.
Faculty members from various
departments are invited to take
part in the weekly discussions. De-
partments which have participated
include economics, sociology, psy-
chology, physics, history and law.
Due to its popular reception, a
proposal to convert the course to
a non-honors program is current-
ly being discussed.

"LEMMON IS HILARIOUS"
-TIME MAGAZINE
Carol n4
Edie Adams -
Nmoe T "Coca
NEXT; PALM SPRINGS WEEKEND"

I I'

RE=

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
HELD OVER

7

,

ORGANIZATION NOTICES
. ..{1 :.J....h:."".,1.."." ' : J

DIAL 2-6264
4iuii

STARTING TODAY
4 Shows Daily at
1:00-3:30-6:05 & 8:45
Feature Starts 20 Minutes Later

I

mm

1

r

WELCOiM§E NU McUNUGK
POPULATION: the most brawling, roist- town - every lock, every stock and every
ering adventurers in the West! And beauty-- but one ... and that starts the
McLintock the man owns McLintock the battle that puts the town in the mud!

Cercle Francais, La Lecon rescheduled
Dec. 5 & 6, 8 p.m., 2065 FB. Tickets
good for either night. Refunds 2-4 p.m.,
Tues. & Wed., FB Lobby or Romance
Language Office, 2076 FB. Tickets still
available.
German Club, Annual Xmas Party,
AA Renaissance Choir, Instrumental En-
semble & High School Students from
AA, Dec. 5, 8 p.m., League Ballroom.
Refreshments. Program in German.
* * *
Gilbert & Sullivan Soc., Meeting of
all active members, Dec.4, 7:30 p.m.,
Union, Rm. 3G.
Hillel Foundation, Lecture: "The
Philosophy of Abraham Joshua Hesch-
el," Dec. 4, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill.
Lutheran Students Assoc., vespers
Service, Dec. 4, 7:30 p.m., Hill lb Forest.
Sociedad Hispanica, Poetry Contest,
Dec. 4, 8:30 p.m., 3050 FB.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
rhe Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4
Day Calendar
Dept. of Speech Assembly - Student
Speakers from Speech 100 Classes: Rack-
ham Lecture Hall, 4 p.m.
Dept. of Zoology Seminar-Dr. E. O.
Wilson, Professor of Zoology, Harvard
U n i v., "Chemical Communication
(Continued on Page 5)
&IBOO
L from
FOLLETT'S
State St. a N. University
A
Daily
subscription

University Lutheran Chapel, Advent
Vesper with Holy Communion; Sermon:
"The Foundations of the Kingdom,"
Pastor A. Scheips, Dec. 4, 10 p.m., 1511
Washtenaw,
* * *
Voice Political Party, Films on Civil
Rights: "Freedom Ride," "Walk to Free-
dom," "Walk in My Shoes," and SNCC's
"We'll Never Turn Back," Dec. 5, 7:30
p.m., UGLI, Multipurpose Rm. No
charge, everyone welcome,
Joint Judiciary Council, Petitioning
reopened for positions on JJC and Com-
mittee on Standards & Conduct, dead-
line date, Dec. 9. Pickup petitions in
Dr. J. Bingley's office, 1011 SAB during
weekdays.
Wesleyan Guild, Wesley Grads: Sup-
per and Program, Dec. 4, 6 p.m., Pine
Room, First Methodist Church,
Wesleyan Guild, Holy Communion,
Dec. 4, 5:10 p.m., Chapel, First Meth-
odist Church,
DIAL. 8-6416I
ENDING TONIGHT
MICHAEL CRAIG
IN
"A PAIR OF BRIEFS"
* STARTS THURSDAY@9
The country that won World War
21/*conquers your funny-bone!
margaret
rutherford
bernard ron david
cribbins moody koSSOff
terry-
thomas
A waiter shenson aooc,,o.,
* You'll roar at the further adventures of
'T he Mouse That Roared"

HELD OVER!

4
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_0

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"Sapin"

*

s

ues., Dec

Fri.

Dec.

"SHEER DELIGHT"
Ann Arbor News

CHOICE
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NOW !

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KEEP FREEDOM

RINGING

MAGNIFICENT THEATRICALITY
STUNNING ... IT'S A HIT!r

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