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November 10, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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ARTS AND LETTERS:
Discusses Role of Musicians

To View Faculty Power Possibilities

II U

DIAL
8-6416

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CONTINUOUS
TODAY
FROM 1 P M.

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
"the orchestral musicians' fight
for recognition is finally beginning
to flower," Lawrence Angell, as-
sistant principal double bass of
the Cleveland Orchestra, said re-
cently.
"It is gratifying to see the in-

creased interest on the part of the
public toward musicians. The pub-
lic has become more musically
sophisticated than it gives itself
credit for. However, this is only a
beginning."
Angell explained that the oc-
cupation of orchestral musicianis
a special kind of job, in which the
employe is expected to maintain
maximum alertness and give his
best every minute he is on duty.
Be it a good day or bad, the mu-
sic must not suffer for it.
Self-Discipline
"We accomplish this through ar-
tistic self-discipline. Our code of
professional ethics permits us to
separate our musical life from
our personal and social lives, al-
though occasional overlaps are
unavoidable, such as befriending
fellow musicians and retaining
music and music-making as a
hobby," 'he explained.
Many people attack us for de-
siring a wage scale comparable to
others of the same educational and
preparational background, but a
comparable income is necessary
for our preservation. They do not
realize that, aside from the hours
spent in rehearsal and concert, we
must become familiar with and
practice our parts on our own. Al-

though ours is not a "nine-to-
five" job, it is intense in hard
work and frequently more ex-
hausting than an eight-hour day,
Angell continued.
Subsidy
He predicted that subsidy is in-
evitable, but that it should be on
a local rather than a national lev-
el to be most effective. "However,
subsidy will only be effective if
orchestral control remains in lo-
cal hands," he added.
"Because George Szell, our con-
ductor, possesses such a dynamic,
overpowering personality, there is,
perhaps, less jealousy among the
musicians in the Cleveland Or-
chestra than in any other.
"This contributes to a tighter,
more unified organization, which
is so important when 105 individ-
uals must work together as one,"
Angell explained.

Continued from Page 11
1___ --- "Committee T has regarded its
Committee T's statement has statement, not as a manifesto aim-
not been unanimouslyapplauded. ed at presenting maximum claims
The Syracuse University chapter, for faculty control, but as princi-
finding too many "vague and neg- ples describing p o w e r s that
ative qualifications" in Committee 'should' exist."
T's version, has drafted its own Specifics
statement. The Syracuse document Prof. Dawson cites several spe-
deletes various phrases which pro- cific exceptions to faculty prer-
vide for exceptions to faculty pow- ogatives which Committee T feels
er, claiming "abusesare invited" must be recognized:
by including these qualifying I r1 _ r_

verse vote of the department's fac-
ulty."
-The Syracuse group asserted
without qualification that admin-
istrators "should be qualified for
faculty membership." But Prof.
Dawson says "some successful
presidents and academic deans
have never met the tests of train-
ing or experience for academic ap-
pointments" and argues against
an "inflexible rule" on the matter.
-On budgeting, "we do not be-
lieve the faculty has special com-
petence, or indeed sustained in-
terest, in preparing and admin-
istering the general budget, includ-
ing such topics as buildings and
grounds."
The University AAUP chapter
has not yet taken a stand on the
issue and is expected to do so at
its next meeting.
3-

"One of the finest films thal Ann Arbor has seen /his fall .
conibines brilliant lirction, and mag nifwcent icling!"
--HUGH Hl-loAND, M whigan Daily
RICHARD
HAR RIS
SPORTING

clauses.
On budgeting procedures, the
Syracuse chapter asks, "Are there
some educational purposes with
which faculties are concerned and
others with which faculties are not
concerned? Does an educational
institution have both educational
and non-educational purposes?

-The legal powers of the gov-
erning board: "the problems they
raise are not dealt with simply by
omitting them. We believe it is
better to reduce these powers to
their proper dimensions and to
concede that 'in exceptional cir-
cumstances' an adverse decision
can be justified if reasons are com-
municated."

RACHEL
ROBERTS
Alan BADEL
William HARTNELL
A )RUAI W .lE ES.E PUIh .WIM

No to Both. -To Syracuse's demands for
"The answer to both these ques- faculty concurrence in all ap-
tions is no," they argue. pointments, Prof. Dawson asks,
Speaking for Committee T, Prof. 'What if a department becomes
Dawson answers that "we should run-down, ingrown, narrowly spe-
not overstate our own real objec- cialized? . . . An appointment
tives. would be justified despite an ad-

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS

4

GEORGE SZELL
... strong personality

UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA
JOSEF BLATT, Conductor
OLIVER EDEL, Cello
ROBERT COURTE, Viola
Bruckner-Symphony No. 8
Strauss-Don Quixote

THURSDAY, November 14

8:30

ADMISSION FREE

HILL AUD.

STUDENTS & FACULTY
Ciftenltid ,wild

LAST TIMES TONIGHT

TODAY
10:30 a.m.-The Newman Club's
informal breakfast discussion will
present Brother David, O.S.B. who
will speak on "Monks: The Real
Religious Rebels" at the Newman
Center.
3 p.m.-The Professional The-
atre Program will present Shake-
speare's "Much Ado About Noth-
ing" in Trueblood Aud.
MONDAY, NOV. 11
4:15 p.m.-Dr. Lester J. Evans,
author and lecturer in the field
of health education, will speak on
"The Contemporary Scene in
Medicine" in Rackham Lecture
Hall in the first of the annual
William W. Cook Lectures on
American Institutions. This year's
series of five lectures is titled
"The University and Medicine."
4:15 p.m. - The music school
will present a recital by string in-
strument students in Lane Hall
Aud. playing Telimann's "Mus-
ique de Table," Bach's "Suite No.
2," and Beethoven's "Sextet Opus
81B."
TUESDAY, NOV. 12
4 p.m.-Dean William Haber of
the literary college will speak on
"Adjusting to Change" in Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
4 p.m.-The International Stu-
dents Association will present
Prof. L. C. Rowe of the political
science department, who will
speak on "Cultural Change in
Russia" in the Multipurpose Room
of the UGLI.
4 p.m.-Prof. Charles O. Huck-
er of Oakland University will
speak' on "The Traditional Chi-
nese State and Bureaucracy" in
Rm. 1300 Chem. Bldg.:
4:10 p.m.-Robert Bly, poet and
editor of Sixties magazine, will
give a reading of poetry with com-
mentary in Aud. A.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13
7 p.m.-Prof. Laurence Gould
of the University of Arizona will
deliver the Ermine Cowles Case
Memorial Lecture, speaking on
"Antarctica-Frontier of Interna-

August Strindberg's shattering
dramatic story of a young
upperclass Swedish woman
and the family gardener.
Directed by Alf Sjoberg
Starring ANITA BJORK
"Powerful & Compelling"
Call 662-8871
for further information

tional Science" in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall. The lecture is sponsored
by the museum, the geology de-
partment and Sigma Xi.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present J e a n Anouilh's
"Thieves' Carnival" in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre as the second
production of the Playbill series.
8:30 p.m.-The University Mus-
ical Society will present the Mos-
cow Chamber Orchestra, conduct-
ed by Rudolf Barshai, in Rackham
Lecture Hall, as the second con-
cert in the Chamber Arts series.
The program will include "Sym-
phony No. 29 in A Major" by
Mozart, "Divertimento in F Ma-
jor" by Bartok, "Visions Fugitives"
by Prokofiev, and "Concerto in
B Minor for Four Violins, 'Cello
and Orchestra" by Vivaldi.
Also.. . The University art
museum will open a special ex-
hibit of the works of Michigan
artist Leon Dabo. Thirty paint-
ings and drawings spanning 60
years of the artist's work wall be
shown.
THURSDAY, NOV. 14
4 p.m.-The Young Republicans
will sponsor a workshop on "Na-
tional Political Parties : Their
Function and Structure" in Rmn.
3-C of the Michigan Union. Prof.
James Pollock of the political
science department will moderate
the discussion.
4:15p.m.-Prof. John F. Kolars
of Rutgers University will speak
on "Interpretations of the No-
mad's Role in Turkish Society" in
Aud. B.
4:15 p.m. - The Rev. Gordon
Jones, rector of St. Andrew's
Episcopal Church in Ann Arbor,
will speak on "What Is Vocation"
in the Union Ballroom. This is
the first part of a conference on
vocations in the field of religion,
sponsored by the Office of Re-
ligious Affairs. As part of the con-
ference, 25 representatives from
seminaries and theological schools
across the country will be on
campus for personal consultation.
4:30 p.m. - The International
Students Association will hold a
tea at the International Center.
7:30 p.m.-Voice political party
will present a program of films on
reactionary subversion in the
Multipurpose Rm. of the UGLI.
The films to be shown are "And
Women Must Weep" and "An-
atomy of a Lie."
7:45 p.m.-The Office of Relig-
ious Affairs' conference on voca-
tions in religion will present a
panel discussion concerned with
the actual applications of "voca-
tion" to work and life, in the
Union Ballroom.
8 p.m.-The Eastern Orthodox
Student Society will present Rev.
Miltiades B. Efthimiou, who will
speak on "The Weeping Icon of
Hempstead, L o n g Island" in
Aud. A.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will p r e s e n t Jean Anouilh's
"Thieves' Carnival" in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present

Fry's "A Phoenix Too Frequent"
and Moliere's "Scapin" in True-
blood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The University Sym-
phony Orchestra, conducted by
Prof. Josef Blatt of the music
school, will give a concert in Hill
Aud. The program will feature
Bruckner's "Symphony No. 8 in
C minor" and Richard Strauss'
"Don Quixote." Professors Oliver
Edel, 'cello, and Robert Courte,
viola, of the music school will be
the featured artists.
FRIDAY, NOV. 15
1 p.m.-Dean Milton Froyd of
the Colgate Rochester Divinity
School will speak on "What- Is
Theological Education?" in the
Union Ballroom, as part of the
Office of Religious Affairs' con-
ference on vocations in religion.
4:15 p.m.-Dr. Lester J. Evans,
executive director of the New
York State Committee on Medical
Education, will speak on "Medical
and Health Profession Education
-Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow" in
Rackham Lecture Hail, ii the sec-
ond of the William W. Cook Lec-
tures on American Institutions.
4:15 p.nm.-Prof. Robert Zajonc
of the psychology department will
speak on "Role of Perception Be-
havior Theory" in Aud. B.
7:15 p.m.-The Michigan Un-
ion and the Michigan League are
sponsoring a mass meeting for
"Frosh Friday" at the League.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will p r e s e n t Jean Anouilh's
"Thieves' Carnival" in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present
Pirandello's "Right You Are (If
You Think You Are)" in True-
blood Aud.
SATURDAY, NOV. 16
8 p.m.-The University Players
will p r e s e n t Jean Anouilh's
"Thieves' Carnival" in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present
Pirandello's "Right You Are, (If
You Think You Are)" in True-
blood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The New York City
Opera Company will present a
special performance of Puccini's
"La Boheme" in Hill Aud., under
the auspices of the University
Musical Society. The opera will
be sung in Italian.
SUNDAY, NOV. 17
2:30 p.m.-The New York City
Opera Company will present Puc-
cini's "Madame Butterfly" in
Italian in Hill Aud., as the third
event in the University Musical
Society's. Extra Series.
3 p.m. The Professional The-
atre Program will present ┬░iran-
dello's "Right You Are (If You
Think You Are)" in Trueblood
Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The University Mus-
ical Society will present Mozart's
"Don Giovanni" with the New
York City Opera in Hill Aud. The
performance, which will be in
English, is the sixth in the Choral
Union series.

DIAL 2-6264
Shows Start at 1:00
2:55-4:50-7:00 & 9:05
HELD OVER THRU TUESDAY
An Entertainment Event
Of Unsurpassed Beauty!
*J
W'I
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and the Philadelphia Orchestra
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FRIDAY, NOV. 15 - HILL AUDITORIUM
Lambda Chi Alpha-Alpha Phi
Sigma Alpha Mu-Delta Phi Epsilon
Delta Tau Delta-Gamma Phi Beta
Trigon-Phi Mu
Theta Xi-Alpha Chi Omega
Delta Upsilon-Alpha Epsilon Phi
Beta Theta Pi-Chi Omega
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Phi Delta Theta-Kappa Alpha Theta
TICKETS ON SALE-TUESDAY-FRIDAY
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LAST TIME!

-17

4

SUNDAY MATINEE

The Flint Journal
M Group's'Much Ado' Is Delightful

E

I

The University of Michigan res-
ident professional company's re-
telling of the comedy is indeed as
pretty a piece of Shakespeare as
either student or enthusiastic
play-goer could wish by way of
celebrating the upcoming 400th

S. GORDON GAPPER
welcome Nancy Marchand, a mis-
tress of stage and screen from
coast to coast, as his forked-
tongue companion.
In her stewardship, Beatrice
indubitably belongs in what has
ben e1ai ud"th ebrillant com-

derstanding, Clayton Corzatte and
Jan Farrand were head-over-heels
in character.
As usual, the APA has come up
wit ha major comic interpretation,

(I

I

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I +hia fimn htr Tnconh 'Rit-A na-

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