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November 09, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-09

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THE M

T.Y

e

Committee Move
Seems To Doom
Tax
WASHINGTON (IP)-The Senate Finance Committee dealt an
apparent death blow yesterday to all hopes for 1963 passage of a tax-
cut bill.
Holding to the deliberate schedule advocated by its chairman, Sen.
Harry F. Byrd (D-Va), the committee set Dec. 13 as the windup date
for its hearings on a House-passed measure to slice $11 billion from
the nation's federal tax bill for 1964.
A Dec. 13 end to hearings, which already have run four weeks;
means only a week would remain before the holiday recess which starts
Dec. 20 and runs to Jan. 2. Based on all past records of tax-handling
in the Senate, a week would be far from enough time to complete

Home Sees
Tory Victory
PERTH, Scotland (R) - British
Prime Minister Sir Alec Douglas-
Home asserted yesterday his elec-
tion to the House of Commons
showed the tide is turning for his
hard-pressed Conservative party.
His view was challenged by La-
borites who claim they are going
to return to power in elections
next year.
Laborites pointed to their vic-,
tory in the industrial district of
Luton, the other seat in the House
of Commons contested in the two
special elections Thursday. A Con-
servative had held that seat.
There were boos and jeers for
his departed Laborite opponent
and some heckling for himself
when the 60-year-old prime minis-
ter made a victory speech on the
steps of the courthouse in this city
in central Scotland.
Kinross and West Perthshire
district gave Home a parliamen-
tary seat by a 9,328-vote margin
over his nearest opponent, a Lib-
eral. He resigned the peerage and
quit the House of Lords two weeks
ago to make the race so that he
could lead his new government
personally from the House of Com-
mons.
Sii' Alec declared the election
constituted "a decisive vote of con-
fidence in the government."
A few hecklers shouted: "What
about Luton?"
But Sir Alec kept right on smil-
ing and waving and claimed the
tide had now turned in favor of
the Conservatives.
World News
Roundup___
By The Associated Press
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -
The Honduran military govern-
ment announced yesterday it has
uncovered revolutionary plotting
by Liberal party members, "Com-
munist agitators and some work-
ers and students." The military
overthrew President Ramon Vil-
leda Morales, a Liberal, Oct. 3. The
announcement threatened a severe
crackdown unless plotting ends.
* * *
BOGOTA - Colombia will ask
that the United States be includ-
ed in a proposal to create a nu-
clear free zone for Latin America,
-Foreign Minister Fernando Go-
mez Martinez said yesterday.
* * *
NEW YORK-The New York
stocks moved up sharply yesterday.
The Dow-Jones Averages showed
30 industrials up 5.15, 20 railways
up 1.64, 15 utilities up .24, and 65
stocks up 1.71.

Senate passage, let alone to com-
promise any differences with the
House.
Byrd opposes any tax cut with-
out a balancing reduction in fed-
eral spending. A principal objec-
tive of the conservative southerner
is to prevent Senate action until
after President John F. Kennedy
submits in January his budget for
fiscal 1965.
Working toward this end, Byrd
has called 70 witnesses, another
100 are on the waiting list and he
has said all who apply will be
heard by the committee. I
After yesterday's committee ac-
tion, Sen. Vance Hartke (D-Ind)
told newsmen he would move in
the committee later this month to
speed up the hearings to make pos-
sible action this year. But a sim-
ilar move last month failed and
most observers figure this motion
would meet a similar fate.
'officials Admit
Wiret appin
.During Probe
WASHINGTON (M-)-Three State
Department officials now have
acknowledged to Senate investi-
gators that the telephone wiring
in Otto F. Otepka's office was
rigged to permit eavesdropping on
conversations in his office.
However, they said no actual in-
terception of conversations took
place, none was authorized and the
wiring was discontinued within 48
hours after a test of its feasibility
proved unsuccessful.
The officials said their state-
ments were intended to amplify
and clarify earlier sworn testi-
mony to the Senate Internal Se-
curity Subcommittee in which they
denied knowledge of the installa-
tion of any listening devices in
Otepka's office.
The subcommittee, headed by
Sen. James 0. Eastland (D-Miss),
yesterday made public the state-
ments and the earlier testimony
without comment.
Otepka, a veteran State De-
partment security officer, was no-
tified Tuesday of his dismissal on
charges of unbecoming conduct.
Among other things, he was accus-
ed of supplying the subcommittee
with information from confiden-
tial employe loyalty files.
Sen. Thomas J. Dodd (D-Conn),
the subcommittee's vice-chairman,
in a Senate speech Tuesday pro.-
tested Otepka's dismissal as an
affront to the Senate. He said
then that the StateDepartment
had installed a tap on the secur-
ity officer's telephone.
"Although a State Department
official has denied under oath that
this was done, the subcommittee
has proof that the tap was install-
ed," Dodd added.

GOP Plans
Grass-Roots
Dixie Drive
By The Associated Press
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Republi-
can leaders hammered out plans
yesterday for organizing at the
precinct level throughout the
South as the way to win Dixie in
the 1964 presidential election.
"We are building a grass roots
organization that will win this
time," said Raymond V. Hum-
phreys of Washington, a national
GOP strategist who has spent
most of the year in the South.
Opening two days of strategy
talks, Republican leaders from 13
states exuded confidence in this
prelude to an all-out push for
a bloc of electoral votes which
they hope will be the springboard
to the White House.
Ripe -
Obviously, top-echelon Republi-
cans consider Dixie ripe for pluck-
ing because of widespread dis-
content with President John F.
Kennedy's policies on civil rights,
spending and the cold war. The
big hitch, of course, is the question
of whether Sen. Barry Goldwater
(R-Ariz), very popular in the
South, will get the GOP presiden-
tial nomination.
Humphreys is director of educa-
tion and training for the Republi-
can National Committee. He said
in an interview that precinct orga-
nization in the South is moving
along rapidly with traditionally
Democratic Mississippi and Ala-
bama both organized.
Goldwater's chief opponent,
New York Gov. Nelson A. Rocke-
feller, opened the nation's first
presidential campaign headquar-
ters for the 1964 elections at Con-
cord, N.H., and proclaimed he
would "fight every step of the
way to get that nomination."
A cheering, placard - waving
throng of more than 350 support-
ers was on hand as Rockefeller
wound up his first two days of his
campaign for New Hampshire's
first - in - the - nation presidential
primary March 10.
Underdog
He conceded that he is the un-
derdog right now, but said that
he would criss-cross New Hamp-
shire many times over in the
months ahead to overtake Gold-
water's apparent lead.
Rockefeller has tried without
success to set up a meeting with
publisher William Loeb of the
Manchester Union Leader.
The governor's press secretary
said that Loeb informed Rocke-
feller he "would not be in Man-
chester today but would be in
Pride's Crossing,.Mass.," where the
publisher lives.
Loeb's newspaper is backing
Goldwater.
Endorse New
NATO Force
PARIS (AP)-Members of parlia-
ment from both sides of the At-
lantic gave qualified approval yes-
terday to proposals for a multi-
national nuclear force under the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion.
Delegates to the ninth annual
NATO Parliamentarians' Confer-
ence sidestepped a definite poi-
tion on the controversial multi-
lateral force. But they called for
the coordination of nuclear re-
sources and said NATO should
evolve a system of joint political
control of existing nuclear weap-
ons.

By The Associated Press
BERLIN-The three Western powers sent convoys along the dis-
puted highway to Berlin yesterday to test Soviet intentions and all
got through without trouble.
Lt. Ivan Scott Lewis, commander of a British convoy from the
Prince of Wales' own regiment, said on arrival in West Berlin, "It
was noticeable that the Russian attitude was much easier."
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev warned this week that the three
Western powers must respect what he called Soviet control procedures
on the autobahn from West Ger-
many to Berlin. He predicted there /
would be more holdups along thei tes V iet
110-mile highway unless these So-
viet rules of the road are respect-
ed. A "-"I"1 d

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DEAN RUSK
---freedom of access
RENDEZVOUS:
Views Red
Space Feat
By JOHN WEILER
The recent Russian launching of
a steerable satellite shows signifi-
cant progress toward a rendezvous
in space, Capt. Robert Finley of
the Department of Air Science
said yesterday.
He noted that the Russians need
only to launch another steerable
satellite in order to be able to ac-
complish the rendezvous. Capt.
Finley said that unlike the United
States earth satellites, which can
only change position inside their
one orbit, the Russian satellite can
change its entire orbit.
He said that the ability to ren-
dezvous or dock in space will be
needed in attempting a moon shot.
Visitors to Satellites
"Militarily, it could lead to pow-
er for the country first able to do
it." Not only could the nation
achieve meetings between its own
space objects, but it could also
rendezvous with other nation's
satellites, Capt. Finley said.
By attaching one of their satel-
lites to an American satellite, the
Soviets could learn how it is con-
structed.
He said that although the Unit-
ed States has never steered a sat-
ellite in an earth orbit, the Sin-
com satellite and the Mariner II
were both sterred in space.
Duet inSpace
Capt. Finley added that the
United States Gemini program is
directed essentially toward man-
ned space rendezvous.
A government .report indicates
that rendezvous in space for the
United States can mean that this
country will be able to insert a
space station into orbit. This space
station would serve as an experi-
mental base for operations in
space.
Although this Russian shot was
unmanned, he commented, a try
might be made soon with another
manned shot with the attempt to
rendezvous and dock the two cap-
sules. Capt. Finley noted that there
is some reason to believe the Rus-
sians tried this on their last dual
spoce shot, in which two cosmo-
nauts were orbited simultaneously.
In any case, the Russians' abil-
ity to steer their satellites shows'
that their capabilities should not
be ignored, he concluded.

Rusk Warns USSR
At a Washington press confer-
ence, Secretary of State Dean
Rusk let the Soviet Union know
that the United States will con-
tinue to insist upon free access to+
West Berlin.1
Describing as "serious" the re-
cent incidents on the autobahn,'
Rusk expressed b e li e f that
Khrushchev shares this view.
At the same time, Rusk criticiz-
ed Congress for its deep cuts in
foreign aid and suggested that the
tendency "to legislate foreign poli-
cy" denies the President the flex-1
ibility he needs to protect United
States interests.I
The news conference was the
first one by a secretary of state to
be carried live by several radio
networks.+
Rusk conceded that the inci-I
dents, in which American army1
convoys were held up on the auto-1
bahn, sometimes look artificial be-1
cause they involve only questions
of procedure. But that's not the
real issue, he added.
"The point is not whether a par-
ticular tailgate is lowered," he ex-
plained, referring to a Russian re-
quest that the Americans lower the
tailgates of the vehicles to allow
a head-count of troops.
Access Crucial
"The point is freedom of access1
to West Berlin."
This access, he said, is "utterly
fundamental," and Warned thatr
Russian insistence upon changing1
control procedures on the highway
"could be converted into a power
to interrupt access to Berlin."
Rusk invited the Soviets to1
"work out better arrangements" on
Germany and Berlin based on
Western proposals.
Rusk conceded he has no ready
explanation for the incidents.
He said Soviet actions on the
highway appear "to cut across
and interrupt a good many other
things that they have been say-
ing. It is very hard to know what
is in the mind of the other side. I
would just have to say I do not
understand it."

By The Associated Press
SAIGON - A senior American
military spokesman said yesterday
"all reports indicate Vietnamese
officer morale throughout the en-
tire country has risen strikingly"
since the Ngo Dinh Diem regime
was overthrown last weekend.
The spokesman told a news
briefing that at junior officer lev-
els in particular the "coup d'etat
was greeted with widespread emo-
tion."
If this boost in morale can be
translated into action against the
Viet Cong, "our timetable for vic-
tory against Communist guerrillas
should be shortened," the spokes-
man declared.
He said the United States high
command in Viet Nam would con-
tinue to press for new approaches
to the war in various fields, par-
ticularly in effective civic action
by armed forces.
Aiso, Nationalist China an-
nounced it has recognized the new
government of South Viet Nam.
In other developments, Father
Cao Van Luan was reinstated as
rector of Hue University.
The Roman Catholic educator
was removed from his post in Au-
gust by the Diem regime. His re-
moval was followed by widespread
protest demonstrations by students
and his reappointment to the post
was regarded as an important con-
cession by the new government to
popular sentiment.
Father Luan, 49, had been di-
rector of the university in Hue,
400 miles north of Saigon, since
the school was founded in 1958.

5706 S. University*
Chicago, III.

ROAD TO BERLIN:
Soviets Let Convoys Through

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PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Meeting in the Ann Arbor Y.M.-Y.W.C.A
at 5th and Williams
Rev. Jesse Northweather, Pastor
Phone 668-9894
SUNDAY-
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m. Training Union.
7:30 p.m. Evening Worship.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Meeting in Room 528D
in basement of S.A.B.
Monday-7:00 to 8:00 p.m. Bible Study.
Thuarsday--5:10 to 5:40 p.m. Vesper Service.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
1 1:00A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-I
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Woshtenow Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 A.M. and 12 Noon.
PresbyterianCampus Center located at the.
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckordt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPELt
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastorx
John Koenig, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Services, with
Holy Communion.. S e r m a n: "Man's
Whither, Whence, and Why."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study. Be-
gin study of Ephesians.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Students, Supper and Program, with Prof.
Kenneth Pike as the speaker.
Wednesday at 10 p.m.: Midweek Devotion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Worship Services -
Speaker: Miss Esther Barnhart, Missionary
from Japan.
7:00 p.m. Program: "The Selection of Ap-
propriate Music for Worship Services."
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m. Vespers.
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School.
7:00 p.m. Student Guild.
9:30 a.m. German Worship Service in Chapel.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
For Transportation Call 2.2756
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
663-5560
Minister-Hoover Rupert
Campus Minister-Eugene Ransom
Associate Campus Minister-Jean Robe
SUNDAY
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 11:15 a.m.
"The Poverty of Busyness," Dr. Rupert.
10:15 a.m.-Student Seminar, Methodist So-
cial Creed, Pine Room.
TUESDAY
8:30-11:00 p.m.-Open House, Miss Jean
Robe's apartment.-
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, follow-
ed by breakfast.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.mn.-Wesley Grads, Supper and Pro-
gram, Pine Room.G"Face to Face," Self-
Identity of the Young Adult.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Forest at Washtenaw
The Rev. Donald Postema
Morning Worship-10:00 a.m.
Vesper Service-7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for al services-
Call NO 2-2756

it

NOW PLAYING (Fri. & Sa
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APA
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A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
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