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November 09, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1063 -

OA-VIOLENCE:
Smiley Views Rights

Enrollment
Struggle May Harm
However, he continued, th 'U Fnaces
method of non-violence still at-,
tracts more adherents. In this
respect he-cited the great drawing (Continued from Page 1)
power Rev. Martin Luther King

THE ICHIAN DILYSTUA~. NOVEMBER 9. 1L11V 1 911

0

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

r

By STEPHEN BERKOWITZ
The "little people have lost all
recourse to normal means-they
seemingly have lost all control
over their destiny," Glen Smiley,
field secretary for the Fellowship
of Reconciliation, said yesterday.
Speaking at a Guild House
luncheon, he explained some of
the origins of the non-violent
mode of protest now prevalent in
the South.
Smiley described the growth of
civil rights protest as "inevitable"
in light of the "rising expecta-
tions" of the Negro people.
"In the revolutionary situation,
people have arisen with faith in
themselves." This has created an
atmosphere in which "the day
after tomorrow is too late," he
said.
Stark Raving Mad
"To tell the Negro who has ex-
perienced these rising expectations
to take it easy today is to drive
him stark raving mad," he con-
tinued.
YRs Elect Leaders

Commenting on the "fear of
intermarriage" often encountered
by those involved in race rela-
tions work, Smiley said that "if
you don't believe in intermarriage,
then you condemn the vast ma-
jority of people to illegitimacy"
because racial intermarriage is an
accomplished fact.
Non-Violent Method
Smiley defended the primacy of
the non-violent method in . the
civil rights struggle.
"The. second school, those ,who
use violence or the threat of it to
accomplish their ends, is an ap-
pendage . .. an outgrowth of the
success of the method of non-
violence," he said.
Smiley described the Black Mus-
lims as "formidable" and said that
they have been "maligned" by
being compared to the Ku Klux
Klan.
Puritans
"They are puritans," he said,
"they don't drink or smoke and
have high standards of morality in
other ways."
However, they are "backward,"
and are "like the apartheidists in
that they are going against the
tide of 'communitarianism'," the
belief in a worldwide community
of man, Smiley asserted.
These organizations gained
prominence only after the success
of the non-violent method. This
method was accepted in the South,
but met resistapce in the North.
Here the Black Muslims found
fertile soil for the growth of their
ideas.

For Coming

Year

The Young Republican Club
elected new officers Thursday
night. Elected were:
Chairman, Berge Gregian, '64L;
Vice-Chairman, Dale Warner, '64
A&D; Corresponding Secretary,
Sharon Manning, '64L, Recording
Secretary, Betty Jo Smith, '65L;
and Treasurer Frederick H. Kra-
mer, '64L.
I _______________

k

DIAL
8-6416

d4' x"J1

CONTINUOUS
TODAY
FROM 1 P.M.

Jr. has demonstrated during re-
cent speaking engagements in Ne-
gro communities in the North.
In describing the philosophy of
the method of non-violence,
Smiley said that its adherents say
that "I will not allow you to do
this to me, not because it injures
me, but because of what it does
to us both. I will not help you to
do this, because I love you."
"The civil rights movement must
utilize means consonant with its
ends," Smiley noted.
Great Sympathy
Smiley said that he spoke to
city officials earlier in the day
and found "great sympathy among
them-which can be exploited."
Whereas "all honest people" in-
volved in civil-rights protests
would admit that "theirs is not
a passive, but a militant, aggres-
sive; coercive tactic; it cannot be
used as a bludgeon. It cannot be
used to keep what has been taken
by violence," Smiley said.
Commenting on Robert F. Wil-
liams' book, "Negroes with Guns,"
Smiley said the author did not
provide a viable solution in arming
the Negro community in Monroe
County, North Carolina, when local
law enforcement officials would
not protect the Negro population
from acts of violence perpetrated
by whites.
Cancel Address
On Civil Rights.
Prof. Robert Coles, of Harvard
University Health Services, who
had previously been scheduled to
speak today on "School Children
and Integration in Atlanta and
New Orleans," has been forced to
cancel his talk, Nanci Hollander,-
'65, chairman of Voice political
Party announced yesterday.
Prof. Coles, who had formerly
been with the Southern Regional
Council, was scheduled to speak in
the Michigan Union at 4 p.m.
under Voice sponsorship. Although
no definite date has been an-
nounced as yet, tentative arrange-
ments have been made for Prof.
Coles to speak here sometime in
the spring.
Brother To Speak
At Newman Club
Speaking at the Newman Club In-h
formal Breakfast Discussion to-
morrow at 10:30 a.m., Brother'
David, O.S.B., will discuss "Monks:
The Real Religious Rebels."
Coming to the
WORLD'S FAIR?

"One of the finest films that Ann Arbor has seen this fall .. .
combines brilliant direction and magnificent acting!"
-HUGH HOLLAND, Michigan Daily
X. X. YSPORTING
hLI3
RACHEL
HM s n m
"Best Picture" 1963 Alan BADEL
INTERNATIONAL FILM CRITICS t' HAIL
Willam HARTNEL
''Best*Actor'"196"" '"
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL MNR[J
STUDENTS & FACULTY

hours-717,500-is nearly 10,000
higher than MSU's 708,000. While
the figures for 1962-63 are not yet
available, enrollment data indi-
cates that they would not be sig-
nificantly different.
The figure which brings the en-
rollment picture into focus is that
of cost per credit hour. Universi-
ty officials say that for every dol-
lar put into lower-level under-
graduate education, two dollars go
into upper level undergraduate ed-
ucation, three dollars go for M.A.
candidates and eight dollars go for
PhD. candidates. In actual dol-
lars, the cost of a credit hour to
the University at the various levels
is currently as follows:
-Freshman-Sophomore: $17.31.
-Junior-Senior: $27.99.
-Graduate M.A.: $52.73.
-Graduate Ph.D.: $122.71.
-Professional: $45.69.
These figures average out to a
level of $32.76 for each credit hour
taught at the University.
The University teaches more
credit hours than MSU, so costs
here are greater. But the costs of
running this institution are even
higher than might be assumed be-
cause the bulk of students fall
in the categories where costs are
astronomical. Graduate student
education alone here costs roughly
$15 million.
Theodore H. Drews of the Of-
fice of Institutional Research says
that "over the years Michigan
State has tended to emphasize high
enrollment at low class levels."
Drews, an administrative assistant
to Vice-President for Academic
Affairs Roger W. Heyns, predicts
that the "war baby generation"
about to descend on colleges and
universities will affect MSU ear-
lier than it will affect the Univer-
sity.
"They should feel the effects
about four years earlier because
their concentration is at the fresh-
man-sophomore levels. The Uni-
versity, however, will feel the pres-
sures over a longer period of time.
This was equally true of the 'vet-
erans' bulge' which came after
1946.
"While other schools suffered
temporary problems, the pressure
on us was greater because many
of the veterans who were admit-
ted here stayed for graduate
school," Drews said.
He emphasized the point that
MSU's higher enrollment meant'
little in terms of budgeting, "be-
cause they're taking their growth
in areas where expenses are least."
"The policy of appropriating the
same to all institutions on the
basis of head-count, or anything
approximating it, would mean an
assumption by the Legislature that
all institutions do the same level
of work, Niehuss said. "It would
ignore the fact that our Medical
School, the Law School, our grad-
uate programs-whatever their en-
rollment-are in a class by them-
selves"
Niehuss said the University
could react to the situation by
"piling up at the freshman and
sophomore levels. We could get
more funds for more enrollment
while decreasing our costs. But
this just isn't the way to develop
an institution. It isn't the Univer-
sity of Michigan."

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
ofilcial publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building'
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 9
Day Calendar
Acoustical Society of America Meet-
ings-Rackham Lecture Hall, 9 a.m.
cinema Guild - Strindberg's "Miss
Julie," plus shorts "The Critic" and
"Twelve Angry Men": Architecture Aud,
7 p.m. and 9 p.m.
Professional Theater Program-Asso-
ciation of Producing Artists in Piran-
dello's "Right You Are (If You Think
You Are): Trueblood Aud. 8:30 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Nancy Bradley, pianist. Lane Hall Aud.
8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Leadership training courses for women
students in the areas of camping and
aquatics are again being offered by
the Dept. of Physical Ed. for women
during the spring sem.
Application blanks are available in
Room 15, Barbour Gym. and must be
returned by 3 p.m. Wed., Nov. 27.
Certificates are awarded at the com-
pletion of the course.
Wed. through Sat.: 8 p.m. in the Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theatre, the Univer-
sity Players of the Dept. of Speech
present Jean Anoullh's French hit,
"Thieves' Carnival" Box office open
beginning Mon. 12:30-5 p.m. daily, 12:30-
8 p.m. performance nights.
Mr. Robert Bly, 'poet, editor, and
translator, will give a reading of poetry
with commentary on Tues. afternoon,
Nov. 12, at 4:10 p.m. in Aud. A, Angell
Hall. All interested persons are invited
to attend.
Notice on Discipline: At the meetings
of the Joint Judiciary Council on the
nights of Oct. 3, 10, 17 and 24, 1963, the
following cases were heard.
Violation of University Regulations:
a) Two students in possession of
intoxicants in student quarters and
unauthorized admission of male guest
intostudent quarters and presence
therein after closing hours: Fined
$15.00 each person and one weekend
social probation for each.
One student one hour late in arriving
at living quarters and illegally entering
women's residence after closing hours:
two weekends social probation.
One student assisting an illegal en-
try into women's quarters after hours:
one night social probation.
b) One student providing a minor
with identification: fined $10.00.
c) One student confiscating pre-
viously stolen University of Michigan
property: Fined $5.00, suspended.
d) Two students illegally appropriat-
ing University property: Fined $10.00
per student, $10.00 suspended.
e) Four students defacing public
property: four students issued oral
warning.
f) One student-minor in possession
of liquor: Fined $10.00, suspended.
g) One student in possession and il-
legal use of Staff Paid parking permits:
$5.00 reimbursement parking office, fin-
ed $10.00, $5.00 suspended.
h) One student attempting to pur-
chase alcoholicbeverages: $10.00 sus-
pended fine.
One student providing ID for minor:
$10.00 suspended fine.
i) Two students appropriating Uni-
versity property: two students oral
warning.
) One student appropriating Univer-
sity property; one day late and one hour
and forty-five minuteslate; also neglect
and lack of responsibility on part of
individual in not contacting house di-
rector: Fine $25.00, $10.00 suspended;
two weekend nights social probation.
k) Ane student in possission of and
illegal use of a staff paid parking per-
mit: Fine $15.00, $10.00 suspended.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Mademoiselle Magazine, N.Y., N.Y. -
Three annual contests now being spon-
sored by Mile for college women: The
College Board Competition, the Art
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Congr. Disc. E & R Student Guild,
Covenant Community Conference. Lead-
er: Brother David, Nov. 9, 7 p.m., 802
Monroe.
* * *
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Workshop
in "Conversational Prayer" with Rosa-
lind Rinker, Nov. 9, 1 p.m., Grace Bible

Church Aud.__
Unitarian Student Group, Planning
Session & Social Hour, Nov. 10, 7:30
p.m., Unitarian Church.
* 0';:
Wesleyan Guild, Student Seminar:
The Methodist Social Creed, Nov. 10,
10:15 a.m., 1st Methodist Church, Pine
Room.

LAST CHANCE!
TO SEE MUSKET'S
"T EBYa musical comedy of the 19FRI'sD
"yt ... yt"4 Q6 i tN v ''.
:,y~yr'$.?}? ',j:,+"i; :ti; {.j;:V'.,;ti".,".. {
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4t.": : .%}risi":?: . \, Y
<. .-.r, :::.: .. .v. .. ... ,.." ... : ..::;.v .
:Y":2 ..h". .
:y{ ."3'Tv"^:hE BOY:."..vv FR IEN D"'v}CF '$.v -L '?
r^:X..::N t"} iv^. is a smashiSg good time<?::
MATNE TOA}!23
GODSET TILAAIAL
H"}"i:;} LYDIAy{Z'"JMENDELSSOHN: v.:}v} :: THEAT'i yrE;BOX-OFF{ti}" I CE rr}:.}}"~
TONI??}Y:::.. HT'S ..;{}} PERFORMANCE4:v.'." SO'' LD-OUT : .}: '}:. {. "}".y.
}:x ::'v."Iv y . : :} " :: "::: . ; . Y f~;".

Contest and the College Fiction Con-
test. College Bd. Competition designed
for undergrads with talent In writing,
promotion, art, fashion, merchandis-
ing, or advertising. First assignment is
due Nov. 15. Winners spend June in
NYC to work on the Aug, issue (will
be salaried month). The Fiction & Art
Contest winners will be awarded $500
and their work will be in the Aug.
issue of Mile. Further details and ap-
plications on bulletin board outside
Bureau of Appts., 3200 SAB.
Boston Univ. Sch. of Public ReIs. &
Communications - Announcing various
graduate assistantships and scholarships
in 1964-65. Included are: WBUR Grad
Assstantships--$100 for calendar yr.
-FM radio station operated by Div. of
Communication Arts; Leon M. Abbott
Scholarships in Journalism; Graduate
Prod. Assstantships, etc.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Wis. Civil Service.--1. Community Or-
ganization Consultant-BA, prefer a yr.
of grad. trng, in Public Health, Educ.
or related fields and 3 yrs. exper. Apply
by Nov. 25. 2. Public Health Educator

III-Sch. Health-Degree, 1 yr. grad.
trng., in applicable field and 2 yrs.
exper. Apply by Nov. 25.
Parker Pen Co., Janesville, Wis. -
Product Engnr.-Minimum BS in ME
(will consider other branches of Engrg.)
Creativity and ability to supervise and
coordinate all phases of a project are
essential.
levi-Duty Electroc Co., Lake Geneva,
Wis.-Opening for EE with minimum 5
yrs. exper. dealing directly with O.E.M.
accounts.
Eaton Labs Div. of Norwich Pharm-
acal Co., Norwich, N.Y. -- Openings in
the following areas: Chem., Pharma-
cology, Microbiology, Biochem., Phar-
maceutical res., Medical (physician),
Traffic; Legal (patent attorney).
B. F. Goodrich Co., Akron, Ohio -
various openings including: Engineers
(all types); Sr. Ops. Analyst; Math:
Patent Attorney (chemical); Patent At-
torney (mechanical); Physicist; Chem-
ists.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.

Il
HpcI
i S
MASS
MEETING,
SUNDAY
SNOV. 10
4 7:303
UNION
BALLROOM
Theme will be
announced.

r

t

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Gineftna Ott/4Ppejenti
tonight & tomorrow at 7 & 9
August Strindberg's shattering
dramatic story of a young
upperclass Swedish woman
and the family gardener.
Directed by Alf Sjoberg
Starring ANITA BJORK
"Powerful & Compelling"

27/ei

lniver-iy ,r///cat

Socetqj

Rest your feet
at the

presents
"LA BOHEME"

Chinese Food Shop

Rm 2L

Union

I

E

_

by Giacomo Puccini

(sung in

Italian)

DIAL fMtL V EK
2-6264 Shows Start at 1 :00
2:55-4:50-7:00 & 9:05
t WALTDISNEYS
f J I**
with
STOKOWSKI ,..
and the Philadelphia Orchestra
FEL STEREOPHONIC SOUND mHeNiinaiandE cmte
TECHNICOLOR. ' eteeeu IyBaNAYSAstrrLg. Co m(twahmunrdncwm Presented in SUPERSCOPC
NEXT:
"WOMEN OF THE WORLD"

With The
NEW YORK CITY OPERA
"An unforgettable and moving performance ...
-New York Times
IN HILL AUDITORIUM, SAT., NOV. 16, 8:30
(not on a series)

Call 662=8871
for further information

TICKETS:

$4.50--$4.00-$3.50--$3.00-$2.25-$1.50

-I

I

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER

11

Vs M 0

srrr

Ann Arbor Folk and
LESTER
FLATT

Jazz Society Presents
EARL
SCRUGGS

LAST TIME!
SUNDAY MAT
The Flint Journal
M Group's 'Much Ado
S. GORDON GAPPER

rINEE

' I

s

Delightful

I

presents
ile lhI

The University of Michigan res-
ident professional company's re-
telling of the comedy is indeed as
pretty a piece of Shakespeare as
either student or enthusiastic
play-goer could wish by way of
celebrating the upcoming 400th
anniversary of Shakespeare's
birth.

welcome Nancy Marchand, a mis-
tress of stage and' screen from
coast to coast, as his forked-
tongue companion.

derstanding, Clayton Corzatte and
Jan Farrand were head-over-heels
in character.
As usual, the APA has come up
wit ha major comic interpretation,
this time by Joseph Bird as
Dogberry, the constable. To him

and THE FOGGY MOUNTAIN BOYS

In her stewardship, Beatrice
indubitably belongs in what has
been called "the brilliant com-
pany of Shakespeare's women.

E

I

I

,E

-

I !

m

I

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