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November 07, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-07

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PAGE TWO

VUW MICUIV-_ R AT IM. WY X7

1AG TW '' lu;' il A ~TUDAILY '

THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 7, 1963

I

0714-11~f AT N !'Y T T tA X T 4-1'1-.7

Ryder Cites 'Cohort' Concept

PTP Presents Comedy

By ALAN Z. SHULMAN
"In order to make some head-
way towards understanding social
change, one must utilize the con-
cept of the 'cohort'," Prof. Norman
Ryder of the University of Wis-
consin sociology department said
yesterday.
One's cohorts are "those people
who have approximately the same
time of birth and thus the same
age during any given period," he
said.
"Traditionally, social change
has been explained in terms of the
o v e r w h el m i n g socialization of
children by their parents; society*
evolved because of the different
distribution of hereditary mate-
rial in the children as compared
to their parents. The only diffi-
culty with this theory is that it
fails to explain rapid social trans-
formation," Prof. Ryder said.

' ' -

He emphasized that he did not
wish to discount the importance of
early impressions on the socializa-
tion of the individual. "There is
an early training period that
makes an impression upon a per-
son to a considerable degree, al-
though theoretically one is social-
ized throughout his life.
"The large-scale socialization
that must take place is a challenge
to the stability of every society."
Prof. Ryder said. "Each year so-
ciety is faced with the loss of its
leaders, the most experienced
people, who must be continually
replaced. At the same time society
is confronted with a barbarian
invasion by the birth of new co-
hort groups."
Prof. Ryder noted that while
societies must institute procedures
for socializing new individuals

(J-pN,

DIAL 5-6290
ENDS TODAY

they must also remain flexible.
"Society lives within a changing
environment. The society that
does not change does so at its
own peril. The process of social
metabolism, involving the change
of particular individuals within a
social system, gives society a
chance to adjust continually," he
said.
Schools Revolutionary
Reviewing some of the stand-
ard landmarks of socialization,
Prof. Ryder called the school an
institution "revolutionary in its
implications. It is an agent of
society designed to wrest the child
fromp his family before it can do
too much harm.
"Here, cohorts of children are:
created, separated from other co-
horts on the basis of age and
after long indoctrination, let
loose in society.
"The peer group, on the other
hand, is not a useful sociological
term in describing socialization be-
cause it is not an effective operat-
ing community," Prof. Ryder ob-
served. The young adult cohort
group, unlike the 'peer group,' is
continuous.'
To a great extent, this cohort
group is also responsible for tech-
nological innovation. "Societies do
not change by changing the people
already employed but by introduc-
ing new, uncommitted people. If
you want to get a look at what
society is going to look like, look
at those who are entering, not
those who are leaving it," he
advised.
Prof. Ryder noted that this
might have important implications
for our relations with the Soviet
Union where cohort groups that
never lived during the Bolshevik
period are coming into promin-
ence. "Our approach to the USSR
may have to change with the rise
to power of these new groups."

OPENS TONIGHT-The Professional Theatre Program presents
Joanne Roos and Sidney Walker in Pirandello's "Right You Are
(If You Think You Are)," 8:30 p.m. today in Trueblood Aud. The
play, a comedy-drama, is considered a forerunner of the avant-
garde theatre.
COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Affiliates Call Meeting
ToView Moral Issues

Comments
On Snow's
Culture Gap
By MILLICENT NOBLE
Prof. John. Bardach of the
zoology department found weak
points in Sir Charles Snow's an-
alysis of the culture gap between
science and the humanities, "The
Two Cultures and the Scientific
Revolution" at an Donors Steer-
ing Committee discussion recent-
ly.
"I don't think the split between
the two cultures is as strong and
as serious in America as Snow
makes it out to be in Britain,"
Prof. Bardach said.
Prof. Bardach cited examples of
scientists who are well grounded
in the humanities, and he at-
tempted to debunk the idea that
artists have not taken advantage
of what science has to offer. In
particular he spoke of artists' use
of studies of the nature of light,
and the great influence which
Freud has had on literature.
Science is defined in the dis-
cussion as an attempt to find or-
der in man's experience in the ex-
ternal world. It is the function of
literature to introduce order into
emotional experience.
The artist, Prof. Bardach said,
works as an individual,' while the
scientist is more a part of a com-
munal enterprise.
"Science is remote from imme-
diate human experience, while art
is the immediate human experi-
ence of another who was gifted
enough to evoke some resonance
in me-to explain something to
me," he said.
In the Western sphere of think-
ing there was a duality of God
and man. But eventually the God
became remote.
Then there arose a duality be-
tween man and the rest of the
world, giving science its present
position, he explained.

I

IT'S NEVER TOO LATE
TO FALL IN LOVE !
24
"$
,rN
TONIG HT! SEE MUSKET'S
a mtusieal eomedy of the 1920's
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE THRU SAT., NOV. 9
Matinee Sat.-2:30; Eves. Tonight, Fri. Sat.--8:30
TICKETS AVAILABLE ON DIAG & BOX OFFICE
Dead and Use Daily Classified Ads
-- -~'~N ---~ ----~-- -s "

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,AoDBP6 /riOLDG
MARRYf NELSON ° DIANE MCBAIN edMICHP[1.RENNME A wnMER'YN
Beset on the Stage Produced on the Screepfay ty firectby
Play by JEAN ERR- Sageby ROGER STEVW S- WCHM 4LEREEN.NERVYN LERO? UOUC0 N 1 1.f*
COMING
"The Incredible Journey"

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By ROBERT GRODY
LOS ANGELES-An official of
the University of Religious Con-
ference at the University of Cali-
fornia at Los Angeles has called
for a statewide conference of fra-
ternity and sorority leaders which
he said "might begin a movement
of independence from alumni con-
trol and outside influence which
could spread throughout the whole
fraternity-sorority system in the
United States."
He called for a re-evaluation of
Greek goals, and an investigation
into the "moral issues involved in
the real meaning of brotherhood

Vor4rmRgmrqwmmpmlmL

NOW
DIAL 8-6416
NEVER BEFORE HAS T
EXPLODED WITH SUC
RAW EMOTIONS!

J

Shows
at
7-9' P.M.

HE SCREEN
H
RICHARD
HARRIS
SPORTING
LIFE'
RACHEL
ROBERTS
Alan BAREL
William HARINELL

Across Campus

John Lewis, national chairman
of the Student Non-violent Co-
ordinating Committee, will be the
speaker at a protest rally at 3:15
p.m. today on the mall between
Hill Aud. and the Michigan
League.
The rally, sponsored jointly by
Voice Political Party, the Univer-
sity Friends of SNCC and the Ann
Arbor Fair Housing Association-
CORE, is part of a nationwide
demonstration against police bru-
tality and harrassment of civil
rights workers in the South.
Research Talk...
Dr. Henry W. Riecken of the
National Science Foundation will

"Best Picture" 1963
INTERNATIONAL FILM CRITICS
"Best Actor"1963
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

'N . ' :::: ::t sS kt t :i:ii~v4"riij:i::'i.i:,.
OPENS TlO-NIGHT!
h PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAMs
presents
# APA
DDA 1d r%C 1 AtC D D 11 1U1A bkI3rDA l AA

speak on "Trends in Research on
Behavior and Society" at 2:15 p.m.
today in the Main Conference Rm.
of the Mental Health Institute.
Tooth Development ...
Walter E. Brown of the Re-
search Division of the National*
Bureau of Standards and the
American Dental Association will
speak at 4:15 p.m. today in Rm.
1300 of the Chemistry Bldg. on "A
Physical-Chemical View of Devel-
opment of a Tooth."
Non-Violence...
Glen Smiley, associate secretary
for field work of the Fellowship
of Reconcilliation, will speak on
a non-violent philosophy for di-
rect action in racial tensions at
4:15 p.m. today in the Henderson
Rm. of the Michigan League. He
will also speak on the case for
civil disobedience in race relations,
at 7:30 p.m. in the Wesley Lounge
of the First Methodist Church.
Voice Films ...
Voice Political Party will pre-
sent a program of films on peace
at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. today in the
Multipurpose Rm. of the UGLI.7
The films include "The Hole,"
"The Language of Faces," "Love
Your Neighbor" and "Overture."
Cleveland Orchestra...
The University Musical Societyj
presents the Cleveland Orchestra,t
conducted by George Szell, at 8:30
Im_ Mdav in Hill Ari

and sisterhood," which "racial dis-
crimination certainlyhdoesn't em-
brace."
M x. .<
NEW YORK-The admissions
director at Columbia University
announced that members of the
Class of 1965 who scored below
average in the scholastic aptitude
verbal test have continued to per-
form outstandingly in academic
work.
Of the 72 class members who
had scores below 550, 63 are still
in the college.
BOULDER-The University of
Colorado chapter of the Young
Americans for Freedom's executive
board unanimously passed a reso-
lution opposing compulsory wom-
en's hours and "other regulations
governing personal activities and
other sectofs of the individual's
private life." The board is also
considering circulating a petition
in support of the resolution.
* *' *
NEW YORK -The Board of
Higher Education of the City Uni-
versity of New York has refused
to censure the Hunter College
literary magazine for allegedly
"anti-Catholic" material in last
spring's edition. The board an-
nounced that it "will not now, nor
in the future administer academic
punishments for violations of lit-
erary taste nor for vulgarity of ex-
pression."
ST. PETER, Minn.- Beginning
with the class enrolling at Gus-
tavus Adolphus College this fall
for the first time, the academic
load will be measured in terms of
courses, rather than the previous
credit system.
The normal load will be four
courses for a semester and the
requirements for graduation will
be 32 courses, attendance, at four
winter terms, a course in physical
education to be completed in four
terms and a reading course to be
completed in eight terms.
These academic revisions high-
light a new calendar based upon
the "15-3-15 plan." There will be
a fall term of 15 weeks ending
before Christmas vacation. A
three-week winter term will im-
mediately follow Christmas vaca-
tion during which special projects
will be worked on, such as bring-
ing outstanding scholars to the
campus as visiting professors, con-
ducting field trips or conducting
seminars. The winter term will be
followed by a one-week reading
and touring period.
DIAL 2-6264
Shows Start at 1:00
2:55-4:50-7:00 & 9:05
NOW SHOWING

MICHIGRAS 1
*MASS MEETING--SUNDAY, NOV. 10
7:30 UNION BALLROOM
This year's theme will be announced

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Ap a

r iIANDE CLLV J DILLIANT1 DhAMAefi.ft. eynu.
The concert, the fifth in the
TLaUEBLuOD 4 Of e THURS. 8:30 Choral Union Series, will include
THEATRE Seats NOW at OX FRI.* 8:30 RI.'the "Jupiter" symphony by Mo-
SAT. 8:30 zart and "Symphony No. 3 in
4544454444 + 4' .4'..:?,£t$ fix:} .'.S 'NY"'.'.: '.t!; r r*.'t""s, 44 NR:..<; '4v 4: 4 . '<. . . . .. ;:.;yr:,>.}> ':$
, .. ... ... , :........ ... ..ter . 4. ....;.,... .... .N. ":". .am in o r'' b y B ru ck n er.
44. ..o^. 2 .r' 1... . . .; .i....,::-.::._:::.:v..iiip:".i"vii:": '"i
BRIGETTE BARDOT
will not be at the
1963 WORLD'S FAIR
Fri., Nov. 8, 7 'til 12, and Sat., Nov. 9, 12 'til 1 A.M.
THE MICHIGAN UNION
She will not visit
ROOM-SIZE DISPLAYS FROM 20 LANDS
She will not flavor 90 minutes of international talent at the
5 SPARKLING NEW VARIETY SHOWS
P ..-hA 10 QDKA a..: 7 0 r A 1 1 0D AA Cn+

F

An Entertainment Event
Of Unsurpassed Beauty!
F~I~ si
WALT
-~,
DISNEYS
s STOKOWSKI .i
and the Philadelphia Orchestra
S TECHNICOLOR"'

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I

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