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November 07, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-07

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71963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T" EE

7, 1963 TIlE IHCIIIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Bipartisan Senate
Slices Aid to $3.7

Dinh ReportsI
Provocations
By Viet Con
SAIGON (P-The new revolu-
tionary government's s e c u r i t y
minister said yesterday the Viet
Cong Communists are trying to
stir religious strife in South Viet
Nam in the wake of the coup that
destroyed Ngo Dinh Diem's re-
gime.
Maj. Gen. Ton That Dinh said
xsuccess of the revolution hast
stricken the Viet Cong with fear
of annihilation in a revitalized
military campaign and that they
are desperately trying through re-
ligious channels to divide the peo-
ple and spread confusion.
Meanwhile, Communist guerril-
las doubled their attacks on stra-
tegic hamlets and outposts this
week as South Viet Nam's military
revolutionary committee began re-
organizing its field command
structure.
In Washington, the State De-
partment said the new govern-
ment has requested United States
recognition and the American re-
ply is "under active considera-
tion."
Press Officer Robert J. McClos-
key said the United States re-
sponse is expected to be given in
the near future.
However, the machinery for rec-
ognition was already in motion
and the formalities were expected
to be completed within a day or
two.r
The United States was review-
ing its policies in South Viet Nam,
preliminary to acting on the
request.
Margin Boost
Creates Drop
On Exchange
NEW YORK (AP) - The Stock
Market shuddered yesterday under
the impact of a boost in the mar-
gin rate and international ten-
sions.
Prices fell sharply and trading
was heavy.
The Federal Reserve Board late
Tuesday increased the down pay-
ment required for buying stock to
70 per cent from 50 per cent.
The board usually takes such
action when it feels there is ex-
cessive use of credit for specula-
tive purposes.
Dow-Jones averages' showed 30
industrials down 5.19, 20 railroads
down .77, 15 utilities down .89 and
65 stocks down 1.64.

STIFF PROTEST:
U.S. Calls Troop Delay
'A rbitrary, Unjustified'

WASHINGTON (o)-The United
States delivered a stiff protest to
the Soviet Union yesterday over
the 42-hour delay of an American'
army convoy on the highway to
Berlin.
The convoy was finally released
Tuesday night.
The note charged the Soviet
action blocking the troop move-
ment was deliberate, without jus-!
tification, against established pro-
cedures, inadmissible and arbi-
trary.
"The United States government
requests the Soviet government
immediately to instruct its mili-
tary representatives in Germany!
to bring to an end once and for all
these hindrances. The United
States government will hold the1
Soviet government responsible for
all consequences of the failure to
comply with this request," it con-
cluded.
Presented in Moscow
The American protest was pre-7
sented at the Soviet foreign min-
istry in Moscow along with iden-
tical notes from the British and'
French governments.'
Soviet military personnel halted
the 13-vehicle United States con-
voy en route to Berlin early Mon-
day as it entered East Germany.'
Demands that the soldiers dis-
mount to be counted were refused.
During the delay both a British
and French convoy were cleared
quickly by the Russians although.
they also refused to dismount and
permit a head count. .
Claim U.S. Gave In
A qualified State Department
source flatly contradicted Soviet
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev's
claim that the blockade was lifted
only after the Americans gave in
to Soviet demands.
The convoy, the official declar-
ed, moved strictly in accordance
with normal control procedures-
the same procedures the United
States spelled out in a notifica-
tion to the Soviet Union Oct. 29.

In the United Nations, the So-
viet Union accused' the United
States of creating an artificial
crisis over access of Western con-
voys to Berlin.
Soviet delegate K. V. Novikov
made the accusation in the UN
main political committee during
debate on disarmament. Novikov
gave the committee what he said
was the official Soviet version of
the latest autobahn incident.
World News
Round up
By The Associated Press
VATICAN CITY-A Spanish
bishop proposed to the Vatican
Ecumenical Council yesterday that
Roman Catholic bishops partici-
pate in the election of Popes.
In another development the
council voted to go ahead with a
disputed document on diocesan
government.
ALBANY-Gov. Nelson A. Rock-
efeller today becomes the first
declared candidate for the 1964
Republican Presidential nomina-
tion.
* * *
WASHINGTON - Teamsters
Union President James R. Hoffa
announced yesterday nationwide
contract demands that would cost
the United States trucking indus-
try nearly $1 million a day over
a three-year period.
~* * *
MOSCOW-Premier Nikita S.
Khrushchev denied yesterday that
the Soviet Union had given up
plans to put a man on the moon.
* * *
MONTGOMERY-Auburn Uni-
versity was ordered by a federal
judge yesterday to admit its first
Negro in January..

Xction
Change Bill
To Increase
Overall Cut
Dirksen, Mansfield
Drop Prior Demands,
WASHINGTON ( P)-The Senate
adopted last night a bipartisan
leadership compromise amend-
ment slashing the foreign aid au-
thorization bill by $460 million to
$3.7 billion.
The vote was 89-0 after the
Senate had voted 86-3 to approve
a surprise leadership-sanctioned
change in the amendment lopping
off $50 million.
A $25-million cut in the com-
promise had been v6ted Tuesday,
making the total $75 million below
a $385-million cut proposed by
Majority Leader Mike Mansfield
(D-Mont) and GOP Leader Ever-
ett M. Dirksen (R-Ill).
Clears Way
Adoption of their amendment
cleared the way for action on
other proposals aimed at cuts in
programs not embraced in the
compromise and in placing tighter
restrictions on administration of
the program.
The amended bill compares to
$4.2 billion recommended by the
Senate Foreign Relations Commit-
tee, $4.5 billion originally request-
ed by President John F. Kenne-
dy and $3.5 billion voted by the
House.
Mansfield and Dirksen had of-
fered their compromise in an ef-
fort to stave off deeper cuts in
the $4.2 billion recommended by
the Senate Committee.
Breaks Logjam
Their agreement to the $50 mil-
lion cut sponsored by Sen. Hu-
bert H. Humphrey (D-Minn), as-
sistant majority leader, broke the
logjam which for nearly two weeks
has held up action on the contro-
versial measure.

WASHINGTON (P) - Republi-
cans found satisfaction in their
showing but Democrats claimed
the top prizes yesterday in off-
year elections that bore the marks
of the civil rights struggle and the
gathering battle for the Presi-
dency.
Democrats withstood Republi-
can challenges to win the elec-
tions for governor of Kentucky
and mayor of Philadelphia. But
the Democratic margins were
whittled far below those of past
years.
Democratic Lt. Gov. Paul John-
son overwhelmed a Republican
opponent to win election as gov-
ernor of Mississippi-but it was
the first serious GOP challenge
in that deep south state since re-
construction days.
Real Run
"We gave our opponents a real
run for their money in Philadel-
phia and Kentucky," the Repub-
lican committee said. "In Missis-
sippi a great stride has been made
toward the establishment of a
two-party system."
Republicans also could point to
their strongest state election show-
ing in New Jersey in a dozen
years, and GOP victories in dozens
of Indiana mayoral clashes.
Bailey disagreed, saying, "While
there were the expected number of
off-year turnovers in local elec-
tions on local issues, the Demo-
crats triumphed in the two races
strontium 90
Reaches Peak
WASHINGTON (Y)-The peak
has been reached for the United
States in deposits of strontium 90
unless there is further nuclear
testing in the air, a public health
service official said yesterday.
Dr. Donald R. Chadwick, chief
of the service's division of radio-
logical health, made that evalua-
tion in commenting on a new
report showing that the strontium
90 content of milk continued to
decline in August in most of the
nation.
Chadwick said it appears the
peak was reached during June,
when the average daily level for
62 sampling stations throughout
the nation was 32 picocuries per
liter of milk. There was a decline
to 31 in the daily average during
to 32 in the daily average during

OFF-YEAR ELECTIONS:
Democrats Emerge Victors

which the Republicans publicized
as expected harbingers of Repub-
lican resurgence in 1964-the
mayoralty race in Philadelphia
and the governor's race in Ken-
tucky."
Small Margin
Democratic Mayor James H. J.
Tate of Philadelphia, who got a
campaign assist from Kennedy,,
topped Republican James T. Mc-
Dermott - but the Democratic
margin of nearly 61,000 votes was
the smallest in 12 years.
Tate drew heavily on Kennedy's
support in his last-minute cam-
paign, and got large margins in
the voting in predominantly Negro
districts.
Democrat Edward T. Breathitt
Jr., a heavy favorite, won a slim
victory over Republican Louie B.
Nunn in the Kentucky guber-
natorial race.
Nunn, who campaigned against
an executive order calling for in-
tegration of public accommoda-
tions in Kentucky, made the
strongest GOP gubernatorial
showing in 20 years.
Retiring Democratic Gov. Bert
Combs issued the order, but court
action has kept it from going into
effect. Nunn called it dictatorial
and charged it was designed to
win Negro votes.
In Mississippi, Johnson polled a
record-shattering vote and built
a lead of almost 2-1 over Republi-
can Rubel Phillips.
Unpledged Electors
Johnson campaigned as a lead-
er of Southern opposition to Ken-
nedy and the administration civil
rights program, and promised to
support unpledged Democratic
electors in next year's Presidential
election. He hopes southerners can,
RACK 'EM UP!
BILLIARD
MICHIGAN UNION
10:30 A.M.-10:30 P.M.
Sorry girls--men only

use unpledged electorial votes to
bargain for civil rights concessions.
In New Jersey, Democratic Gov.
Richard J. Hughes suffered a pair
of setbacks. Voters turned down
a $750 million bond issue he pro-
posed for colleges, state institu-
tions and highways; and put Re-
publicans in control of both.
branches of the state legislature.
In Indiana, dozens of mayor's
offices switched from Democratic
to Republican hands, although
Democrat John J. Barton held the
Indianapolis mayorality for the
Democrats.
President John F. Kennedy,
who took a personal hand in one
key contest, passed word that he
was "very satisfied" with the out-
come.

The
mittee
trend"

Republican national com-
saw "a definite Republican
in much of the balloting.

J

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