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November 06, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-06

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6,.1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Soviets Lift Blockade
Of Army Convoy Unit

EMBASSIES MEET:
Blockade Toughens Western Reaction
4~

By The Associated Press
MOSCOW-The latest Soviet
blockade on the Berlin Highway
appeared here yesterday to have
had the immediate effect of tight-
ening up-and toughening-the
Western reaction.
Quite aside from the meeting
of the French, British and Ameri-
can representatives in Washing-
ton, there has been a meeting of
minds of the British, French and
United States embassies here.
United States Ambassador Foy
Kohler is absent so the meeting
involved second level personnel of
the three embassies. They met at
the American Embassy.
It was looked upon as likely-
although there was no official
confirmation-that an American
note would be fired off to the
Soviet government.
Demonstration of Solidarity
It appeared equally possible
that in event the blockade of the
American convoy should be pro-
longed, it would be joined by
French and British convoys, as a
demonstration of solidarity.
This was largely speculation
among those examining the situ-
ation here.
But there was equal considera-

-AssociatedP ress
HALTED SOLDIERS-Members of a 12-vehicle 44-man convoy
receive orders after being denied access to Berlin for 44 hours.
tion of another point-that this Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrush-
is a Soviet probing operation, plus chev once remarked that Berlin
an effort to bring the Western was President John F. Kennedy's
nations closer to acceptance of sore toe "and I can step on it
talks on a non-aggression pact. whenever I want to."

Allies Pass
Berlin Gate*
Crisis Ends
Kennedy, Aids Discuss
Fourth of Roadblocks
BERLIN (J)-Soviet forces lift-
ed their blockade of a 44-man
United States Army convoy early
yesterday after having barred it
access to Berlin for 42 hours in a
sharp Russian-United States con-
frontation in divided Germany.
The first unit of the 12-vehicle
convoy started to. move up the 110-
mile highway to West Berlin at
8:14 p.m. yesterday, an Allied of-
ficial said.
A break in the crisis was sig-
naled earlier when the Russians
allowed British and French con-
voys to move from Berlin to West
Germany without incident.
Halted at Marienborn
The United States convoy, re-
turning to Berlin from maneuvers
in West Germany, was halted at
the Marienborn checkpoint at 8:01
a.m. Monday. Marienborn is just
inside Communist East Germany
on the border with West Germany.
The American convoy com-
mander refused a Soviet demand
for his men to dismount and be
counted and he persisted in the re-
fusal throughout the two-day cris-
is.
The Americans attempted early
yesterday morning to drive on to
Berlin, but the Russians moved
armored cars across the highway.
Bumper to Bumper
The United States convoy was
stopped bumper to bumper with
three Soviet armored personn'el
carriers' blocking any forward
movement. Two other armored
cars wvexe pulled up behind it. The
Russians had at least one heavy
machine gun out in the open and
manned. Its barrel was turned
diagonally across the road.
A United States spokesman said
the Soviet armor was removed be-
fore the processing of the convoy
started toward Berlin early yes-
terday.
In Washington, President John
F. Kennedy, Secretary, of State
Dean Rusk an dtop advisers met
for 50 minutes at the White House
yesterday to discuss this fourth
Soviet blockade in a month on the
lifeline linking Berlin with West
Germany.
There was no comment after the
meeting, but Rusk said beforehand
that the blockade was "a very
serious matter."

Release Ca
SAIGON (P)-United States of-
ficials turned over to the Viet-
namese military government yes-f
terday another brother of the Ngo
Dinh family-Ngo Dinh Can, ruler
of Central Viet Nam.
He had sought refuge in the
United States consulate at Hue.
Can was brought to Saigon on
a 400-mile flight in a United
States military plane from Hue,
where Buddhist opponents of the
ousted Ngo Dinh Diem regime
charged that he ruled as a bloody
tyrant.
It was not known whether Can
was aware he was being brought
here by the United States officials.
Speculate on Sentence
In Saigon, some foreigners ex-
pressed belief the military gov-
ernment would put Can on trial
and perhaps sentence him to death
or a long prison term.
United States officials were un-
derstood to have received assur-
ances from revolutionary authori-
ties that Can "would not be
lynched and would receive due
process of law."~
Diem andhis brother Nhu died
after they were captured by rebel
forces Saturday. The government
said both men committed suicide

but an informed source reported
they were slain by army men after
they had surrendered to rebel
troops in a Roman Catholic
church.
Mass Grave
Meanwhile, unconfirmed re-
ports circulated at Hue, capital
of Central Viet Nam, that 1801
bodies had been found in a mass
grave at Can's mansion there. Re-
sponsible officials said rows of
filthy dungeons were found in an
old French arsenal on property
owned by Can just south of Hue.
Can dropped from sight when
the coup overthrew Diem's regime
and he went to the United States
consulate in Hue Monday night.
Consular officials notified the
revolutionary government.
Then late Tuesday afternoon,
Can was flown to Saigon and
turned over to government offi-
cials. He was reported to have
been rushed from the airport to
the nearby headquarters of the
military junta.
In Washington, state depart-

ment officials said Can was given
"temporary refuge" in the con-
sulate but left it willingly when
the consul and Ambassador Henry
Cabot Lodge received guarantees
of safe passage for Can to Saigon.
Meanwhile in Washington, the
United States is moving toward
recognition in the near future of
the new provisional government
in Saigon.
The Viet Nam Embassy inform-
ed the State Department yester-
day of the formation of a govern-
ment by Vietnamese Premier Ngu-
yen Ngoc Tho.
U.S. Recognition Near
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
told the Senate foreign relations
committee he has "great hopes
that the United States will be able
to recognize Viet Nam in the
near future."
"In spite of tragedy there in the
past few days, we hope that coun-
try can pull itself together and
move on with a new effort toward
the main objective," Rusk said
after the meeting.

STANLEY G. THAYER
... admits defeat

Senate Ibills
Income Tax
(Continued from Page 1)
Brown outlined the main prob-
lem as "a lack of communication
between the parties."
Sen. Charles S. Blondy (D-
Detroit) said that although Rom-
ney had said originally that he
had more than one tax program,
he still had presented only the
one. Blondy also commented that
perhaps a good tax program could
be evolved by taking parts from
not only Romney's program, but
also the proposals submitted by
other senators.
"Substituting the governor's
program for Brown's is simply
equivalent to its discharge from
the appropriations committee,"
Blondy said.
Thayer then proposed again
that the senate adjourn and that
the Republicans and the Demo-
crats could get together and "talk
all morning" about the governor's
program. He didn't put this in the
form of a motion, however.
After the vote was taken, the
senate adjourned until today,
when action will be taken on
other parts of the governor's fis-
cal reform program.

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Scientists Win
Nobel Awards
STOCKHOLM (P)-The last of
the Nobel Prizes for 1963, in phy-
sics and chemistry, were awarded
yesterday to two Americans, two
Germans and an Italian.
Mrs. Maria Goeppert Mayer, 57,
of the University of California, Dr.
Eugene Wigner, 61, of Princeton
University, and Dr. J. Hans D.
Jensen, 56, of Heidelberg Univer-
sity share the physics prize for
their research into the structure
of the atom and its nucleus.
Two chemists who helped to
usher in the age of plastics di-
vide the chemistry prize. They
are Prof. Karl Ziegler of Muel-
heim, Germany, and Dr. Giulio
Naata of Italy's Polytechnic In-
stitute of Milan.
The prizes this year amount to
$51,158 each.

1963 WORLD'S FAIR
OPENING BY
PRESIDENT HATCHER

FRIDAY at 7 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM

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CHAPLAIN MAL

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(selection
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COLM BOYD
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s from Wright, Ellison, Baldwin)
and the drama,'
DY IN COLOR"
DNIGHT at 8
igell Hall, Auditorium 'A'
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
)ff ice of Religious Affairs .
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TONIGHT at 8
BRO. DAVID,
Benedictine Monk, and Ph.D. in Psychology, Vienna
Leads a Discussion on
"Monastic and Jewish Views in Life"
at the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation

-d

1429 Hill St.

All Are Welcome

The Rev. Malcolm Boyd, Epis-
copal chaplain at Wayne State
University; freedom rider, play.
wright and author. (If I Go.
Down to Hell, Crisis in Comnu-
nication, et. al.)

An

MICHIGAN UNION CAFETERIA
Wednesday Night's Featured Item
GERMAN POT ROAST-BUTTERED NOODLES
Served in the Center Room 5-1 P.M.

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Sponsored by VOICE and the C

i

World News
Roundup

11

1

By The Associated Press

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Hamilton,
Standard

United
DIVISION Or t
Aircraft

Aerodynamics
Combustion
Compressible Flow
Control Dynamics
Digital Computation
Analog Computation
EDP Systems/Procedures
Electronics
Electron Optics
Fluid Dynamics
Heat Transfer
Hydraulics
Instrumentation
Internal Aerodynamics
Kinematics
Magnetic Circuitry
Mechanical Metallurgy
Mechanics
Metallurgy
Physical Chemistry
Physics
Quality Control
Reliability
Servomechanisms
Statistical Analysis
Structures
Systems Analysis
Thermodynamics
Thermoelectricity
Tool Engineering
Transistor Circuitry
Vehicular Dynamics
Vibration

On Campus for Interviews
.November 13 and 14
OPENINGS FOR BS, MS
ENGINEERS and SCIENTISTS

"
"
"
0
0
0
0

Mechanical
Aeronautical
Engineering Physics
Applied Mechanics
Industrial Engineering
Electrical
Metallurgical
Engineering Mechanics
Physics

OTTAWA-Canada signed an
agreement yesterday to sell Po-
land about $88 million worth of
wheat over three years. Trade
minister Mitchell Sharp said Can-
ada will supply 14.7 million bush-
els in the first year-with at least
half to be shipped after the open-
ing of navigation next spring. The
second and third years would see
shipment of a total of 29.4 mil-
lion bushels.
WASHINGTON - The Federal
Reserve Board yesterday tightened
up on use of credit to buy stocks,
increasing the margin requirement
from 50 to 70 per cent. The high-
er margin requirement is expect-
ed to curb what the board con-
siders excessive speculation. Stock
prices have been strong in the
past few months and have hit new
high in recent weeks.
NEW YORK-Selling upset the
stock market yesterday and it
declined sharply in active trading.
The final Dow-Jones averages
showed 30 industrials down 4.51,
20 railroads down 0.71, 15 utilities
down 0.9, and 65 stocks down 1.41.1
Work in Europe
Grand Duchy of Luxembourg No. 6
Summer jobs are available for
students desiring to spend a sum-
mer in Europe but who could
otherwise not afford to do so.
Among available jobs are office
and sales work, tutoring, lifeguard
and high paying (to $400 a
month) resort and factory work.
The American Student Informa-
tion Service also awards $200
travel grants to students. Inter-
ested students may obtain the

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