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November 06, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-06

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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ELECTRONIC MUSIC:
Slawson Predicts Progress

FACULTY MEETING:
AAUP Panel Considers
Role in 'U' Decisions

By STEVEN fIALLER
"Many problems encountered in
composing electronic music can be
attacked through known tech-
niques of digital computer manip-
ulation," Wayne Slawson of Har-
vard University said yesterday.
Speaking on "Electronic Music,
Psychoacoustics and Computers,"
Slawson noted thatdigital com-
puters have been the subject of
much theoretical and experimental
work. They serve as "symbol ma-
nipulators" in that they work with
words or numbers. From such ex-
periments, it is a fairly short jump
to using these machines in com-
posing electronic music, Slawson
said.
Digital computers have been
used in composing for about five
years. Two Illinois workers are
now conducting experiments in
which they feed rules of 16th cen-
tury counterpoint into computers
and turn out "compositions" of
random notes. The scientists ac-
cept some notes and reject others,
according to these set rules.
Lacks Intuition
"Yet such 'music' lacks the mu-
sical intuition that an actual com-
poser could supply. It is this in-
tuitive factor that causes the ac-
tual composer to be better than
the machine and which causes the
machine to be merely a testing
apparatus and not a feasible meth-
od of composing as of yet," Slaw-
son said.
The Illinois workers claim that
by relaxing the rules of counter-
point during the programming,
they will obtain contemporary mu-
sic which is capable of standing
alone as a composition. "I defi-
nitely disagree: in my experience,
composers of electronic music have
had more ideas than they know
what to do with," Slawson com-
mented.
Slawson noted that he prefers
to regard the digital computer as a
source of sound and to design his
computer programs with speech as
the primary goal. "Using these
programs to synthesize sounds for
musical purposes is a strong sec-
ondary goal," he said.
Arbitrary Composition
Slawson explained that the us-
ual method of "composing" with a
computer begins with an arbitrar-
ily chosen waveform. This is then

produce music, a composer meets'
complications from psychoacous-
tics, which Slawson described as
the science relating acoustics to'
the psychological effects a given
sound has on the ear.
Although such considerations do
not bother an orthodox composer
when he writes for an instrument,
the composer of synthetic music
must give them some thought. In
effect, he is writing for a "null
instrument" whose limitations de-
pend upon those of the composer's
electrical equipment, Slawson not-,
ed.
"It would be conceivable to de-
sign a rotation for specifying de-
sired sound, but such a notation
would have to be more concise
than anything now available if it
is to be feasible," Slawson said,
adding that current computer
methods require about a thousand
IBM cards.
Computer Language
Such 2 "language" for computer
programming would have to be
defined in terms of a simple
"grammar," Slawson went on.
Furthermore, . t h i s "language"
should have definite acoustical
significance in terms of the com-
puter being used. But both of these
prerequisites are merely technical
considerations, he pointed out.
Computers can now be used to
create music, but the process is
quite tedious for the composer,
Slawson commented. "I am cur-
rently designing a computer 'lan-
guage' in detail while composing
at the same time, instead of com-
pleting the language before run-
ning it through the computer.

(Continued from Page 1)

WAYNE SLAWSON
... computer manipulation
divided into a number of units
which may or may not correspond
to what an orthodox composer
would cali "notes."
By feeding these units into a
computer, a series of numbers rep-
resenting the original waveform is
obtained. Slawson added that he
used a machine called a synthesiz-
er, which does exactly the oppo-
site, to achieve the same goal.
The series of numbers obtained
is fed into a digital analog con-
verter and turned into a voltage.
This voltage then drives a tape
recorder connected to the comput-
er, so that the final product is the
desired set of sounds.
When using such methods to

desired" with respect to faculty
participation in some departments.
He proposed "a minimum of dem-
ocratic process imposed on the de-
partments from above."
Prof. Kuethe also said the col-
lege's standing committees should
be consulted more when their rec-
ommendations are being decided
upon-before a decision goes to
the Regents.
Prof. Andrew S. Watson of the
Medical and Law Schools con-
trasted the procedures in these
two units.
In the Law School, "any facul-
ty member can engage any other
faculty member in debate-there's
no paucity of democratic process
there. The most striking thing is
that this adversary process is a
highly successful technique of dis-
tilling decisions there," Prof. Wat-
son said.
This process is missing from
medical faculty meetings, where
the school is run in a less demo-
cratic and more complex manner,
he commented.
Prof. Watson noted that the
Medical School has "twice the
problems" of other units because
so many of its actions involve both
school and University Hospital au-
thorities.
Prof. Watson said the resultant
discouragement when a faculty
member seeks to participate in de-
cision-making is the reason he
participates more in Law School
than in Medical School govern-
ment.

AID REQUEST:
Bill May Yield Medical Facilities

(Continued from Page 1)
G. McKevitt of the Office of Busi-
ness and Finance said yesterday.-
"We wanted to be ready with a
program."
He added that it is too soon to
tell exactly how much the Uni-
versity will get for what projects.
"The government has not yet de-

DIAL * ENDING FRIDAY
2-6A6 Shows Start at 1 :00
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tiWALT DISNEY'S
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and the Philadelphia Orchestra
FULL STEREOPHONIC SOUND ne wgna .* twe progr..
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"WOMEN OF THE WORLD"

termined how it will administer
the act. The application forms
aren't even ready."
McKevitt expects, however, that
the money will be appropriated by
the fiscal year 1965-66 and that
the University will have some esti-
mate of the funds for which it may
qualify in time to affect 1964-65
planning.
Medical Science
Last April, the state appropriat-
ed $80,000 for plans for the sec-
ond unit of the Medical Science
Bldg. To be located in the Medi-
cal Center, the building will house
the departments of anatomy, gen-
etics, microbiology and physiology.
Preliminary estimates place the
project cost at $12 million.
In its capital outlay request to
the state for fiscal year 1964-65,
the University is asking for 2.4
million to complete plans and start
construction of the building. A
completion date of 1967-68 is now
anticipated.
The Medical School, addition
may not qualify for funds from
the new act because of plans for a
static enrollment. Increasing en-
rollment is oneof the criteria for
receiving funds listed in the bill.
McKevitt estimated, however, that
the building might receive up to
$2 million from the health re-
search bill, passed by Congress in
1956.
In eight years the University
has received $4 million of federal
money through this program, aim-
ed at research, as opposed to,
teaching facilities.I

The proposed Dental Bldg. re-
ceived a $90,000 planning appro-
priation from the state Legislature
in April. Among other things, this
facility would allow the dental
school to raise its entering class
enrollment from 97 to about 150.
The preliminary estimate says the
project will cost $10 million.
The University is asking $2.3
million from the state to com-
pleteplans and begin this build-
ing.
Dental Building
McKevitt thinks a significant
part of the Dental Bldg. may be
covered under the terms of the
new act. "Until the policies are
established, however, we won't
know where we stand," he said.
He estimated that $4-600,000 of
the project would be covered by
the health research bill.
Construction plans for the pub-
lic health school, University Hos-
pital and the nursing school are
still in the earliest stages of pro-
gram development. The public
health project is farthest along. A
preliminary cost survey has shown
that the school needs $3.5 million'
for expansion.
Similar surveys show that the
University Hospital needs roughly
$10 million for projects it antici-
pates.
Nursing school enrollment has
risen from 444 in 1953 to a current
level of 759. The school moved in-
to a new building in 1958 but is
contemplating a $700,000 addition
to the structure.

PROF. ARTHUR M. EASTMAN
.democracy in LSA
RESEARCH:
Wilson Notes
Fund Study
By Congress
By LOUISE LIND
"With the rapid growth of re-
search and development in the
last several years, it is only na-
tural that Congress begin to take
a good look at federal research
spending now," Prof. James Wil-
son of the geology department and
acting director of the Institute of
Science and Technology said re-
cently.
His remarks were in reference to
several Congressional committees
which have only recently under-
taken an overall study of the fed-
eral role in research.
One group, set up in August by
Rep. Carl Vinson (-Ga), chair-
man of the House Armed Services
Committee, is investigating mili-
tary research.
Another group, formed by Rep.
George P. Miller (D-Calif), chair-
man of the House Science and
Astronautics Committee, is charg-
ed with making "an overall evalu-
ation of scientific research and
development throughout the coun-
try." It is chaired by Rep. Emilio
Q. Daddario (D-Conn).
A House panel, headed by Rep.
Carl Elliott (D-Ala), is under-
taking an investigation of the $14
billion federal research program.
"Congress has grown increasing-
ly aware of the vast amounts of
money that are going into re-
search and development. The
strong Presidential Advisory Com-
mittee under former President
Dwight D. Eisenhower and con-
tinuing under the present ad-
ministration has drawn additional
attention to this fact," Prof. Wil-
son commented.
"It was only logical that Con-
gress would take immediate notice
of increasing federal involvement
in research, and especially of the
federal funds being spent in that
area."
As for the general effect of the
investigations on the IST, Prof.
Wilson said, "The institute will
only be affected as are universi-
ties in general."

Seek Posts
To Increase
Exchanges
By JOHN KENNY
The Association Internationale
des Etudiants en Sciences Eco-
nomiques et Commerciales, a stu-
dent business-economic organiza-
tion, hopes to expand its exchange
program during its second year at
the University.
"AIESEC is a student run re-
ciprocal program offering job
trainee positions to students from
forty countries," according to Her-
bert Behrstock, '65, president of
the Michigan local committee.
Last year the committee pro-
vided eight job trainee programs
which were filled by foreign stu-
dents. The organization hopes to
raise 25 positions this year.
Two courses in business or eco-
nomics are requirements for all
participants although speaking
knowledge of a foreign language is
not required in all countries.
t Jobs abroad, usually for an
eight-ten week duration or a six
month period, are of three types:
a general trainee program, spe-
cialization in one area, such as
sales or statistics, or a specific
"research" project,'Behrstock said.
Through application forms and
an interview with the local com-
mittee's board of advisors, pros-
pective exchange students are
screened. Members of the advis-
ory board are Dean Floyd A. Bond
and Professors D. Maynard Phelps,
Paul W. McCracken of the busi-
ness administration school and
Warren L. Smith, chairman of the
economics department.
Across
Campus
Prof. Norman Ryder of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin will speak on
"The Cohort as a Concept in the
Study of Social Change" at 4:10
p.m. today in Aud. B.
The cohort is a sociological and
demographical construct primarily
used in evaluating fertility rates
and predicting population growth,
although it may be applied to al-
most any set of statistics.
Boyd To Speak ..-.
The Reverend Malcolm Boyd,
chaplain at Wayne State Univer-
sity, will present selected "Read-
ings on Race" and "Study in Col-
or" at 8 p.m. today in Aud. A.
Voice and the Office. of Religious
Affairs are sponsoring the event.
Piracy.. .
Prof. P. N. Tarling of the Uni-
versity of Queensland, Brisbane,
Australia, will lecture on "Piracy
in Southeast Asia" at 8 p.m. today
in the Kalamazoo Rm. of the
Michigan League. The talk is
sponsored by the Center for
Southern Asian Studies.
SGC Meeting .. .
Student Government Council
will meet tonight. Among the busi-
ness that they will consider is a
motion that the Committee on
University Affairs be made the
governing organ of the Conference
on the University.

BEAVER'S
ANN ARBOR'S BICYCLE
and
MINIATURE ROAD RACING
H EADQUARTERS
U of M Socialist Club
presents a public lecture
NEGROES WITH GUNS
Story of Monroe, North Carolina
and Robert F. Williams

E
T
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G

7;30 P.M.
SUN., NOV. 10
UNION BALLROOM

1

V

MICHIGRAS
E A

S
S

I

I

by HAROLD REAPE
7:30 P.M. Thursday, Nov. 7
Vandenburg Room, League
everyone invited

JOHN VALERII

A

DIAL 8-6416
TONIGHT ONLY
FAMOUS CLASSIC SERIES!
EL ,ALEC

IT'S NEVER TOO LATE
TO FALL IN LOVE.
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MILLS HOBSON GUINNESS
66 in J. ARTHUR RANK'S
by CHARLES DICKENS
withBERNARD MILES " FRANCIS LSULLIVAN

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI N
.:.t'..SW.W V.V..... :"

I

I

STARTING FRIDAY:

"TH IS SPORTI NG LIFE"

1

The Daily Official Bulletin is ani
official publication of the Univer-
sity of . Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar No. 102-Dr. Jay Otis, Professor of
Psychology, Director, Psychological Re-

FOR
©4,

F

search Services, Western Reserve Uni-
versity, "Basic Methods of Evaluating
Salaried Jobs": Third Floor Conference
Room, Mich. Union, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Acoustical Society of America Meet-
ings-Rackham Bldg., Registration, 8:30
a.m.
Parent Education Institute-Hill Aud.,
Registration, 8:30 a.m. '
School of Music DMA Piano Series-
Jeffrey Hollander, David Yeomans, Jo-
seph Banowetz: Aud. A, Angell Hall,
4:15 p.m.
Office of Religious Affairs Lecture -
The Rev. Malcolm Boyd, Campus Min-
ister, Episcopal Student Center, Wayne.
State University, "Selected Readings":
Aud. A, Angell Hall, 8 p.m.t
Industrial Engineering Dept. Gradt
Seminar: Dr. Lane Riland and James
Richardson of the Eastman Kodak In-s
dustrial Engrg. Dept. will present a

seminar on "Application of Motivation-
al Research: A Report of Work at East-
man Kodak," Wed., Nov. 6, 3 p.m., 229
W. Engrg. Bldg.
The Center for Southern Asian Stud-
ies invites all interested persons to a
lecture on "Piracy in Southeast Asia"
by Dr. P. N. Tarling of the Dept. of
History, Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane,
Australia, today, Kalamazoo Room,
Mich. League, 8 p.m.
History 575 Hour Exam scheduled for
Monday, Nov. 4, will be given today.
General Notices
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be withheld
until the approval has become effective.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, lecture
and discussion, Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m., Mich.
Union.

Michigan Christian Fellowship, lecture
and discussion, Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m., Mich.
Union.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, discus-
sion, Nov. 22, 7:30 p.m., Ann Arbor
homes.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Pray-
er Workshop-College of Prayer, Nov. 9,
1-4:30 p.m., Grace Bible Church Hall.
U. of M. Socialist Club, lecture, "The
Black Revolt: Negroes with Guns," Nov.
7, 7:30 p.m., League.
(Continued on Page 5)

WORLD'S
FAIR
FRI. AND SAT.

ON CAMPUS
Featuring an extensive selection of:

LESTER

Join the Daily edit staff

SKIS
BLIZZARD
FISHER
HART
KN EIS SL
KRYSTAL
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SOHLER
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GARMISH
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KOFLACK
P&M

CLOTHING BINDINGS

ASPEN
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FLATT
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and the
FOGGY MOUNTAIN BOYS
SAT., NOV. 16-8:30 P.M.

f
I T1

ENDING
fH URS DAY

The wonderful, wonderful story of Mary, Mary,
who said..."Let's not start something
sin a cab we can't finish
on 44th Street."
'~~~i. -.----
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