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November 03, 1963 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-03

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3, 96

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

" ~FOES UNITE:
Tietnamese Cheer Military OU UN.E
___ ____ ____Cup1E llender joins Fhght

By WILLIAM E. RYAN
Associated Press Special Correspondent
TOKYO - Jubilant cheers in
Saigon's streets foretell wide pop-
ular acceptance of a military coup
d'etat which overthrew President
Ngo Dinh Diem.
This can automatically solve a
variety of problems and open
the way for a total war effort
against the Communist guerrillas
in South Viet Nam.
When calm returns to Saigon-
and when proper preparations are
made-there likely will be a deter-
mined drive by South Vietnamese
forces, backed, supplied and train-
ed by Americans, in the Mekong
River Delta area.
Wrap It All Up
"Give us political stability and
we could wrap this thing up in six
months," an American officer told
me recently in Viet Nam. Given
the stability, he was willing to l}et
the delta offensive would come
"damned soon.".
The delta must be the decisive
area for the Vietnamese in their
war against Communist guerrillas
known as the Viet Cong. If that
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
NEW DELHI-Local command-
ers of Pakistani and Indian forces
in the punch area of the Kash-
mir cease-fire line have scheduled
a meeting for today under United
Nations observer auspices, the
Indian government said yesterday.
JAKARTA-West German Pres-
ident Heinrich Luebke pledged his
nation's help yesterday in the
economic development of Indo-
nesia.
BEIRUT-Iraq and Syria open-
ed talks yesterday aimed at
bringing about an economic un-
ion between them.
Baghdad radio said the eco-
nomic union between the two
neighboring Arab countries would
be the second step towards a full
union, after the merger of their,
armed forces one month ago.
WASHINGTON - Sen. Barry
Goldwater (R-Ariz) is preparing
to take out some political insur-
ance on his expected bid for the
1964 GOP presidential nomina-
tion by filing for re-election to
the Senate.
*. * *
GROTON - The Ulysses S.
Grant, 25th Polaris submarine in
the Navy's arsenal, wasj launched
yesterday.

T

part of the country can be cleaned
up, South Viet Nam can hope for
a degree of peace-at least to the1
extent the country knew a meas-,
ure of peace before the Commu-
nists stepped up their jungle war
effort late in 1959.
The United States military has
reported that the Vietnamese gen-
erals have appointed a civilian,
former Vice-President Nguyen
Ngoc Tho, as premier.
Seek Acceptance
This would indicate an effort
by the military men to get them-
selves accepted by the people. It
implies a promise to turn the gov-
ernment over to civilians when
that is feasible.
In this, the influence if not the
direct advice of the Americans
may be playing a part. The leader
of the well-organized couptagainst
the Ngo Dinh family,, Lt. Gen.
Duong Van Minh-known as Big
Minh-is noted for his pro-Ameri-
can attitude.
Gen. Minh may not have had
contact with Americans just be-
fore or even just after the coup
he staged with other high-ranking
officers, but he would know what
the Americans would advise. He
appears to be proceeding accord-
ingly.
Clears the Way
When the way is clear for an
operation against the Commu-
nists in the Mekong Delta, and if
such an operation is successful,
it is possible that Americans can
look forward to substantial reduc-
tion of United States military per-
sonnel in South Viet Nam. There
are 16,000 United States military
men there now-training, advising
and supporting South Vietnamese
troops.
Some parts of South Viet Nam
are owned by the Viet Cong at the
present time. This is particularly
true of the Ca Mau Peninsula
in the southeast corner. There the
Communists levy taxes, recruit at
will and run whatever government
there may be.
In other parts of the southeast,
throughout the delta area, there is
heavy infestation of Red guerril-
las, almost untouched by the of-
fensive operations for some time.
The strategy adopted by the South
Vietnamese army, with United
States advice, had been to try to
clear the north first, and leave
the toughest job for last.
Three Divisions
' There are three South Vietna-
mese army divisions in the delta
area now-as compared with only
one a short time ago.
The Americans say the aim of
the shadowy war is not to kill all
Viet Cong guerrillas. Many of
them are not Communists but
have been dragooned into service.

v C7

But there is a hard Communist
core of perhaps 20,000 which must
be decimated before any measure
of national stability can be in-
stalled, in the United States view.
Some of the problems affecting
stability are automatically solved
by the dieappearance of the Ngo
Dinh brothers from the stage. This
includes the political turmoil over
Buddhist resistance.
The leading generals in the
coup are Buddhists, and so is Tho,
the man reported as their choice
for prime minister. This means
the Buddhist question probably
will now fade out of the picture.
If Gen. Minh is listening to
United States advice, he will be
anxious to end martial law and
restore the civil liberties to which

the South Vietnamese people feel
themselves entitled. It was lack
of those liberties-not the mere
label of "dictatorship" - which
caused Saigon to become a
streaming cauldron of resentment
which finally boiled over.
The repressions of the Diem re-.
gime had filled jails with political
prisoners.
The necessity to attack the elite
special forces-crack Vietnamese
troops withdrawn from the anti- 1
Communist war to protect the NgoI
Dinh family-may have hurt the
Vietnamese army. But the gener-
als evidently were of a mind to payR
that price if it meant the end for
a regime many judged to be a
menace to the anti-Communist ef-
fort.

Needler Predicts Results
Of Venezuelan Election

To End Foreign Aid
WASHINGTON ()-Senate foes M
of foreign aid, facing a tough task Morse and a group in revolt
in cutting the authorization below against the program have now
$3.8 billion, turn next to an ef- piled up more than 50 amend-
fort to terminate the present pro- ents on which they will seek sep-
gram in 1965. arate votes.
Sen. Allen Ellender (D-La), a Some of them will be offered to
longtime critic of the present sys- the pending compromise proposal
tem, said yesterday he will join which slashed $385 million from
in the fight for an amendment to the pending committee in an ef-
wind up the current program June fort to take the steam out of de-
30, 1965. mands for much deeper slashes.
This amendment also would lim-
it assistance after that date to no
more than 50 countries meeting
what Ellender called "very strict
criteria." More than 100 countries
now receive aid.
Calls Up Amendment
Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore) will
call up such an amendment some-
time this week after the Senate
resumes debate tomorrow on a
compromise $3.8-billion authoriza-
tion bill backed by Democratic
and Republican leaders.
The bill cleared its first major
h1urdle Friday when the Senate
voted 46-29 to reject a Morse mo-
tion to send it back to the Foi-
eign Relations Committee with in-
structions to take a second look
and return it no later than Nov. 8I
Sen. Everett M. Dirksen (R-Ill),
the Senate Republican leader,
sponsoring the compromise meas-
ure with Majority Leader Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont), interpreted
that vote as an indication the
Senate finally will approve a fig-
ure pretty-close to $3.8 billion.
No Predictions
How long it will take to reach a
final vote, however, neither Mans-
field nor Dirksen would predict.
"It appears we are in for a long '
siege."

By STEPHEN BERKOWITZ
"Present odds are for a con-
tinuation of the same type of
government that Romulo Betan-
court has been running," Prof.
Martin C. Needler of the political
science department commented
last night regarding the probable
outcome of the upcoming Vene-
zuelan presidential elections.
"However, there is'Kthe clear
possibility that ranking military
officers will be unwilling to "take
a chance" on his successor and
will veto a continuation of the
present situation," he continued.
Prof. Needler further explained
that the "crisis period" would be
toward the end of January, after
the army had had time to evaluate
the results of the election. After
the election, the president would
have to wait out a possible coup
until the inauguration in March.
Trade Union Support
Betancourt's party, Accion Dem-
ocratica, seems almost certain to
run Raul Leoni, who finds his
greatest support in the trade union
wing of the party.
Although Betancourt's party,
Accion Democratica (revived by
Betancourt after the fall of the
dictatorship of Marcos Perez
Jimenez in 1958) has been hailed
as one of the most prominent
representatives of the "democratic
left" in Latin America, Betan-
court's government has encounter-
ed some opposition of late, due to
its curtailment of civil liberties
in the wake of terrorist activity.
Betancourt has recently or-
dered deputees of the all-but-out-
lawed Communist and "Mir" par-
ties arrested in violation of "con-
gressional immunity." The depu-
tees were said to have been incit-
ing terrorist activity.
Other Candidates
Dr. Rafael Caldera, head of the
centrist (COPE) party and seems
former vice-president, and seems
likely to seek office under his
party's banner.
The status of the other parties,
which are not in the government,
is uncertain. Each has its candi-
date, but it is doubtful that one
of them would capture the presi-
dency. A movement is afoot to
unite these parties in support of
a single candidate, Arturo Uslar
Pietri, a distinguished senator who
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

could hope to attract widespread
support.
Although the Betancourt gov-
ernment lacks strengh in the
capital due to, problems of
unemployment, studentmunrest
and other factors, he enjoys wide-
spread popular support among
the members of the peasantry due
to an extensive program of land
distribution.
Army Maintains Order
Because of the necessity of
maintaining order in the .capital,
Betancourt's regime has depended
rather heavily on the army.
As a result, Betancourt has
avoided antagonizing the army
whereas some other "aprista"
(democratic left) regimes have
sought to create a militia of some
sort as a counterbalance to the
professional army.

~i1

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WH ATIS,
"Whether in Asia or Africa, Europe or the Americas, the students'
road is hard, their needs critical. They can count on friends. One
is WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE."
IF YOU ARE
-interested in knowing more about ASIA, AFRICA
and LATIN AMERICA..
-wanting to DO SOMETHING to help others
help themselves .
COME TO AN OPEN MEETING OF THE CSRO to:
-See the film, "Their Future Is Our Future," which
helps explain the World University Service.
-Form a permanent WUS COMMITTEE on the
University of Michigan campus.
7:15 p.m., Room 3529, Student Activities Building
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5

t

Bring

it in

for a complete

Fr

WINTERIZATION

NOW, at
BEAVER'S BIKE

605 CHURCH ST.

NO 5-6607

MICHI
MAI
MEET

GRAS
ING
7:30
UNION
BALLROOM

Comm. on University Affairs, Com-
mittee Meeting, Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m., 3524
SAB.
* * *
Congr. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, "In-
terpretation of the Old Testament,"
Nov. 3, 7 p.m., 802 Monroe.
* * *
IGamma Delta, Supper, 6 p.m.; Busi-
ness Meeting with Initiation-speaker:
Joseph McMahon, 6:45 p.m.; Nov. 3,
1511 Washtenaw.
~* * *
Graduate Outing Club, Hike & Sup-
per, Nov. 3. 2 p.m., Rackham Bldg.,
Huron St. Entrance.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Nov.
4, 3-5 pm., 3050 FB.
Unitarian Student Group, Meeting
cancelled, Nov. 3.
Voice Political Party, Executive Meet-
ing, Nov. 4, 7 p.m., SAB. Everyone
welcome.
j* *
10~
4-

ZIe24t

8 Nickels Arcade
NO 2-2914

LPurent

S4hop

rF

I

SUNDAY
NOV. 10

A Mexican holiday for two at the luxurious Hotel Pierre Marques in
beautiful, exciting Acapulcol You'll fly American Airlines Jet-get
$200 spending money, too!

94 Other Valuable Prizes:

_.

" MAGNUS ELECTRIC
CHORD ORGANS
! REVERE 16 MM TURRET
MOVIE CAMERAS

" RCA TRANSISTOR
RADIOS
s SETCHELL-CARLSON
PORTABLE TV SET

* RIVAL ELECTRIC
CAN OPENERS
" WARING BLENDORSO
IMPERIAL

* VOULEZ-VOUS PERFUME BY D'ORSAY
CONTEST LIMITED TO DETROIT AREA ONLYI

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