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November 03, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-03

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PAGE TWO,

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

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PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY Q1T~!W~ A V' ~ ~

"a' U IJA Y , 1 V EMBER 3, 1,963

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THIS WEEK'S EVENTS

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ARTS AND LETTERS:
Sawyer Cites Teaching
As Museum's Purpose

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TODAY
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present
Christopher Fry's "A Phoenix Too
Frequent" and Moliere's "Scapin"
in Trueblood Aud.
2 p.m.-The Ann Arbor Tutorial
Project will hold an election meet-
ing on the third floor of the Mich-
igan Union. The mass recruit-
ment program will be discussed
and all tutors-matched and un-
matched-are expected to be pres-
- ent.
MONDAY, NOV. 4
4:10 p.m.-The Rev. Walter J.
Ong, S.J., of St. Louis University's
English department, will speak on
"The Past and Future of Cath-
olicism" in Aud. B.:
8 p.m.-Miss Anta White of the
anthropology department will
speak on "The Development of
the Later Stone Age Industry in
North Africa and its Relationship
to the Mediterranean Basin" at a
meeting of the Women's Research
Club in the West Conference Rm.,
Rackgham Bldg.
TUESDAY, NOV. 5
4:10 p.m.-Rev. Ong will speak
on "Rhetoric, Commonplaces and
Shakespeare" in Aud. A.
4:15 p.m.-Wayne Slawson of
Harvard University will speak on
"Electronic Music, Psychoacoustics
and Computers" in Lane Hall Aud.
7:30 p.m.-Prof. John Bardach
of the zoology department will
hold a seminar based on C. P.
Snow's essay, "The Two Cultures
and the Scientific Revolution," in
Lounge 4, Markley Hall. The dis-
cussion, which will deal with the
intellectual gulf between scientists
and literary men, is being sponsor-
ed by the Honors College Steer-
ing Committee,
Also ... University students will
discuss their year of study abroad
in a program given in the Kala-
mazoo Rm. of the Michigan
League.
8 p.m.-The University chapter
of the American Association of
University Professors will hold a
panel discussion on faculty par-
ticipation in the government of
University schools and colleges, in
the East Conference Rm. of Rack-
ham Bldg. All teaching and ad-
ministrative staff members are
invited to attend and participate
in the discussion.
8:30 p.m.-The Stanley Quartet,
composed of Prof. Gilbert Ross,
violin; Prof. Gustave Rosseels, vio-
lin; Prof. Robert Courte, viola, and
Prof. Jerome Jelinek, cello, all of'
the music school, will perform in

the Rackham Educational Memor-
ial in Detroit.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 6
4:15 p.m. - Jeffrey Hollander,
David Yeomans and Joseph Bano-
wetz, all of the music school, will
perform in Aud. A. The program is
a part of the Doctor of Musical
Arts Piano Series.
8 p.m.-The Rev. Malcolm Boyd,
chaplain at Wayne State Univer-
sity, will present selected "Read-
ings on Race" and the original
drama, "Study in Color," in Aud.
A. The program is sponsored by
Voice and by the Office of Reli-
gious Affairs.
8:30 p.m.-MUSKET, 1963, will
present Sandy Wilson's "The Boy-
friend," a musical comedy of the
Roaring Twenties, in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
THURSDAY, NOV. 7
John Perdew will be the featur-
ed speaker at a rally held here
by the University Friends of the,
Student Non-violent Coordinating
Committee. The rally, whose exact
time and location will be announc-
ed at a later date, will be held, to
demand further federal action in
the South.
2:15 p.m.-Dr. Henry W. Rieck-
en of the National Science Foun-
dation kill speak on "Trends in
Research on Behavior and Socie-
ty" in the Main Conference Rm.
of the Mental Health Institute.
4:15 p.m.-Walter E. Brown of
the Research Division of the Na-
tional Bureau of Standards and
the American Dental Association
will speak on "A Physical-Chemi-
cal View of the Development of a

Tooth," in Rm. 1300 of the Chem-
istry Bldg.
7:30 p.m.-Voice will present a
program of films on peace, in
the Multipurpose Rm. of the UG-
LI. The films to be shown are
"The Hole," "The Language of
Faces," "Love Your Neighbor" and
"Overture."
Also . . . The Socialist Club will
,present Harold Reape who will
speak on the "Black Revolt-Ne-
groes with Guns." The room has
not yet been announced.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present Pir-
andello's "Right You Are (If You
Think You Are)" as their third
production of the season in True-
blood Aud.
Also . . . The University Musical
Society will present the Cleveland
Orchestra, with George Szell con-
ducting, in Hill Aud. The program,
which is the fifth concert in the
Choral Union Series, will include
Mozart's "Jupiter" Symphony, and
the Bruckner "Symphony No. 3 in
D minor."
Also . . . MUSKET will present
Sandy Wilson's "The Boyfriend,"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
FRIDAY, NOV. 8
4 p.m.-Walter E. Brown will
speak on "Crystal Structure and
Chemistry of Otacalcium Phos-
phate," in Rm. 1300 of the Chem-
istry Bldg.
4:15 p.m.-Norman Feather of
the University of New England,
Australia, will speak on "Structur-
al Balance Model of Communica-
tions Effects," in Aud. B.
7 p.m. -- The Michigan Union
and the International Student As-
sociation will present their annual

World's Fair at the Union. Variety
shows will be performed at 8 and
10 p.m.
8:30 p.m. - MUSKET presents
Sandy Wilson's "The Boyfriend,"'
at Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Also . . . Prof. Robert Noehren,
University organist of the music
school, will be heard in Hill Aud.
The program will include works by
Bach and Brahms.
Also ... The Professional Thea-
tre Program will present Piran-
dello's "Right You Are (If You
Think You Are)" in Trueblood
Aud.
SATURDAY, NOV. 9
12 Noon-The Michigan Union
and the International Student As-
sociation will present the World's
Fair, at the Union. Variety shows
will be performed at 7, 9 and 11
p.m. The day is designated as
"Youth Day" and participation by
visitors will be encouraged.
2:30 p.m. - MUSKET will pre-
sent Sandy Wilson's "The Boy-
friend" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
4 p.m.-Dr. Robert Coles, re-
search psychiatrist at Harvard
University Health Services, will
discuss his research on school
children and integration in Atlan-
ta and New Orleans, sponsored by
the Michigan Union. Location is
yet to be announced.
8:30 p.m.-Nancy Bradle, pian-
ist, of the music school, will be
heard in a Master of Music De-
gree Recital, in Lane Hall Aud.
Also . . . The Professional Thea-
tre Program will present Piran-
dello's "Right You Are (If You
Think You Are)," in Trueblood
Aud.
Also . .. MUSKET will present
Sandy Wilson's "The Boyfriend"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
SUNDAY, NOV. 10
3 p.m.-The Professional Thea-
tre Program will present Shake-
speare's "Much Ado About Noth-
ing," in Trueblood Aud.

By GAIL BLUMBERG
The University Museum of Art
was conceived essentially as a
teaching instrument, though it is
also intended to be of interest to
the general University communi-
ty, Prof. Charles H. Sawyer of the
history of art department and di-
rector of the Museum of Art said.
The art collection, which began
with University President Henry
S. Frieze in 1855, was originated
to illustrate lectures on the arts
of classical antiquity.
The exhibits from the perma-
nent museum collection in the
Alumni Memorial Hall and in the

collection of Western art from the
sixth century A.D. to the present.
In addition to the exhibits,
which are switched monthly, there
are study collections available to
students upon request.
Contemporary works were bought
at the initiation of the collection,
as they were the most readily
available and provided the least
expensive means of building a
basic collection. Now the emphasis
has shifted to the earlier classical
periods.
Acquisition
Most of the art objects are
purchased from London or New
York art dealers with funds from
an annual University research
grant, Prof. Sawyer said. In addi-
tion, the Margaret Watson Parker
collection fund is being used for
the acquisition of oriental works
of art.
Plans have been under discus-
sion for an increase in available
space, as well as the contempla-
tion of the use of the entire Alum-
ni Memorial building by the Art
Museum, Prof. Sawyer concluded.

The 1964 MICHIGANENSIAN
--t/3bigger
-opening and
closing sections..
- plus a supplement of
over 100 pages of
living groups
- ALL only $5.00
will be ON SALE
in the FISHBOWL
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
November 5, 6, 7 and
November 12, 13, 14.

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Department Chairmen View
Residential College Proposal

PROF. CHARLES H. SAWYER
... discusses museum
UGLI are usually planned for
class use and are often prepared
upon request of faculty members.
Western Art
The permanent collection is
composed of about 5000 objects,
including paintings, sculpture,
prints and other decorative arts,
Prof. Sawyer said. The plan has
been to obtain a representative

<?

(Continued from Page 1)

Prof. Bromage said he is con-
fident that younger faculty mem-
bers attracted to the political
science department in the future
would be interested in a residential
college appointment.,
Problems of Duplication.
Among'the other problems men-
tioned, questions of duplication of
facilities and functions were the
most recurrent.
Professors Anderson and Suss-
man said this problem would be
especially acute in the natural
sciences, because of the large in-

....-- -

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DIAL 8-6416
Continuous Today From 1 P.M.

:High Gea
Humr-
Wholesab
fun! Hila
"-Winston, N.
"Bubbling
Satire!
Charming,
iant"
..Bck -r.
Iflerod Trib m

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fly
S C- Grad Priz Wirnpr San Sebastian, and Edinbund.
Fim Festivals* Presented By Edward Iiarr son

vestment needed to build and
equip new laboratories within the
residential college buildings. These
facilities are much easier to ex-
pand than to duplicate, Prof. An-
derson noted.
Prof. Swanson explained that
the first courses to be duplicated
would be introductory ones; up-
perclassmen would at first take
their 400-level courses in the lit-
erary college. Later junior-senior
courses and seminars could be
added.
Administrative Work
Prof. Else pointed out one more
problem: to the extent that the
new college would be autonomous,
it would bring a great increase in
administrative work.
Finally, the large number of
chairman who said they still have
unanswered questions, and the
large number who declined to
comment at all, indicate that
there are many within the literary
college who have not yet formed
a final opinion on whether or not
this educational innovation should
be attempted.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.

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Coming Wednesday Only-"GREAT EXPECTATIONS"

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MUSKET 1963
Tickets Still Available
Nov. 3-Nov. 9
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN
BOX OFFICE
Wed., Thurs. Evenings
Sat. Afternoon
$1.75
Friday and Saturday
Evening
$2.00

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HOMECOMING GUESTS
DON'T MISS THIS
HIT SUNDAY MATINEE!

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"SCAPIN" and
p~ ~ LGAFo "PHOENIX"
The Detroit News
Fry, Moliere Provide
an Evening of Laughs

1963,6
6 KALEIDOSCOPE OF NATIONS6
6 0
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITIONS
FRI. 7p.m.-2 .m..
6 1 BIG VARIETY SHOWS 6
0 90 Minute Spectaculars-Featuring
International Talent
x

ANN ARBOR, Oct. 19 - A
double bill of fun, Christopher
Fry's "A Phoenix Too Fre-
quent" and Moliere's "Scapin,"
has been added to the Associa-

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RIB-TICKLERS
Presented by the University
of Michigan's Professional The-
ater Program, the brilliantly-
acted shows are performances
of contrasting comic styles.

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