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November 02, 1963 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-02

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ ___ ____ __I

PAGE TI

odge Guides iet Nam Polcy
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-United States policy toward South Viet Nam
once seemed summed up in the slogan: "Sink or swim with Ngo'
. Dinh Diem."
That changed after the pagoda raids of Aug. 21 and Henry
Cabot Lodge took over as the American ambassador to Saigon. In
~ ~ the 10 weeks that preceded the outbreak of a Vietnamese military

HOUSE REPUBLICANS:

-Associated Press
PALACE BURNS AFTER BOMBING-Troops and tanks moved
into place before the presidential palace in South Viet Nam in
February 1962 after fighter bombers rocked and strafed the
building in an unsuccessful attempt to kill Vietnamese President
Ngo Dinh Diem.'
Viet Government To ples;
Diem, Brother Surrender

(Continued from Page 1)

The end of power came for
South Viet Nam's autocratic rul-
ing family after a day and night
siege of the 'stucco presidential
palace in downtown Saigon, cli-
maxed by a 90-minute dawn at-
tack by tanks and artillery.
Gen. Duong Van Minh-a Bud-
dhist long at odds with the Ro-
man Catholic Diem-led the viol-
ent coup which Americans in Sai-
gon said took a heavy toll of Viet-
namese lives. .
Named as provisional prime
minister was a civilian, former
Vice-Uresident Nguyen Ngoc Tho,
who has been leading the govern-
ment's campaign to conciliate en-
raged Buddhists,
Unpopularity at Home, Abroad
Much of the Ngo Dinh family's
unpopularity at home and abroad
has stemmed from its treatment of
Vietnamese Buddhists, and this
conflict had embittered relations
with the United States.
United States officials took the
view that the coup was engineered
by military men primarily inter-
ested in stepping up the campaign
against Communist Viet Cong1
guerrillas.
Their first tentative analyses at-]
tached less attention to' the con-
flicts with Buddhists, who claimed
Diem's regime persecuted them
and with students, hundreds of]
whom were jailed.
U.S. Pressure
The United States put pressure o
on Diem for reforms in order to9

broaden popular support for anti-
Communist measures, but denied
any connection with the coup.
United States Ambassador Hen-
U y Cabot Lodge had called on Diem
Friday morning.
Americans in Saigon said they
believed the insurgents were fully
in control of the city and airport
as of 5:45 p.m. Friday.
Attack on Palace
Telephone reports from Saigon
said rebel forces, whose numbers
could not be estimated immediate-
ly, attacked the palace Friday
night and found a fierce battle
with Diem's palace guards and 2,-
000-man special forces.
The rebels then held off for
about five hours, apparently to
give Diem a chance to give up, an
American in Saigon said.
When Diem demurred, the in-
formant said, the insurgents re-
grouped and mounted a final, all-
out assaudt, starting with an artil-
lery and mortar barrage against
Diem's palace.
Rockets, Planes in City
A spokesman said that while ar-
tillery and mortars were levelling
the palace, fighter planes zoomed
low over the city firing rockets.
The rockets apparently missed the
palace.
Although Nguyen Ngoc Tho, a
Buddhist, had been named prime
minister, the government actually.
was being run by a council of gen-
erals who led the revolt, an Amer-
ican spokesman said.

uprising against Diem yesterday,'
Lodge channeled relations of the
United States with its often dif-
ficult Southeast Asian ally to a
firm, cool level.
Complications
American officialdom saw the
tactics of President Diem and his
family against Buddhist and stu-
dent opposition movements as
complicating the United States-
backed war against Communist
guerrillas.
It hinted, without success, that
Diem's brother-advisor, Ngo Dinh
Nhu, 52, and Nhu's petite, sharp-
spoken wife, 38, the bachelor pres-
ident's official hostess and first
lady, should quit the government.
Three times the United States
tightened economic screws on
Diem's regime, which it has back-
ed with 16,500 military men and
aid of about $500 million a year.
American Tactics
The austere autocrat, :South
Viet Nam's first and only presi-
dent, reacted with bitterness as
President John F. Kennedy's ad-
ministration, seeking to force him
to make peace with his Buddhist
critics and bid for greater popu-
lar backing:
-Cut a commercial import pro-
gram which generated more than
I$100 million a year in Vietnamese
currency for Saigon's defense bud-
get.
-Halted shipments of surplus
food which formed a $25 million
contribution to the South Viet-
namese economy.
Held Up
-Announced the $3 million an-
nual appropriation for premium
pay to the Vietnamese special
forces, an elite military command,
would be held up until those
troops were transferred from po-
lice work in Saigon to combat
Iduty in the field.
Diem's regime opened an anti-
American propaganda campaign.
It leaked stories that it might
make peace with Communist
North Viet Nam, a supply base
and recruiting center for the Red
battalions, rather than submit to
United States pressure.
Diem's Reply
The 5-feet-4 chief executive,
looking younger than his 62 years,
had a stock reply for those who
questioned the way he ran this
largely Buddhist nation of nearly
15 million:
"I know my people."
The son of a noble Mandarin
family who once considered be-
coming a Roman Catholic priest,
Diem had held the government
reins since June 1954-first as
premier under playboy Emperor
Bao Dai andsince October 1955,
as president.l
'Miracle Man'
He was once called the miracle
man of Southeast Asia.
He quelled rebellious private
armies of the Bao Dai and Hoa
Hao sects in 1955 and put down
an attempted coup by parachute
troopers in 1960. He escaped sev-
eral assassination attempts.
In February 1962, two renegade
Vietnamese air force pilots bomb-
ed and heavily damaged the pres-
idential palace. Diem escaped in-.
jury.
Engineered Pagoda Raids
His brother, Nhu, a hollow- .
cheeked, smiling scholar, has beenE
widely regarded as the engineer.
of the pagoda raids which launch-
ed a roundup of Buddhist monksc
and dissident students.
A tough man behind the scenes,
Nhu denied acting on his own. He
said Diem called all the shots.
He headed the secret police along
with his role as presidential ad-
viser. His philosophy about hand-
ling a coup:
"You smash it like an egg be-
fore it is hatched, or you join it
and exploit it."
Considers Americans Naive
Nhu said he admired American
industrial and mechanical achieve-
ments, but considered American
naive in dealing with Asians. Vio-

lently anti-Communist, he saw
merit in some aspects of Com-
munist operations.
To many abroad, Nhu and his
wife have symbolized the govern-
ment's stand in the political-
religious crisis set off last spring
by a Buddhist cry of persecution.
They, like Diem, have denied the
charge.

Asks Corps,
For Detroit
DETROIT-A Detroit Service
Corps of college students to work
in neighborhood conservation and
for volunteer social and service
agencies was called for yesterday
by Mayor Jerome Cavanagh..
1 The Detroit News reported that
the mayor had proposed the idea
in a speech Thursday night. He
said the local program should not
wait for President John F. Ken-
nedy's Domestic Peace Corps bill,
now in trouble in Congress.
Cavanagh said his program
would benefit the community as
well as provide training for col-
lege students. He said that it would
include some of the chores that
the President outlined in his own
proposal. They include:
Outlines Duties
1) Working with church groups
and ministers to provide assistance
in setting up programs for chil-
dren, youth and senior citizens and
other similar projects.
2) Helping with the "meals on
wheels" program of taking food
to shut-ins, and helping in cen-
ters serving senior citizens.
3) Working in the neighborhood
conservation centers, in voluntary
agencies, in hospitals and nursing
homes, in special programs for
elementary and secondary schools
as tutors for those who are be-
hind but intelligent enough to suc-
ceed.
Youth Guidance
4) Working with staff members
of the Commission of Children
and Youth in special programs for
youngsters who need guidance in
getting and keeping jobs.
"All of these activities, would
parallel the existing programs that
we and voluntary agencies have
been working on for some time,"
Cavanagh said.
r

Halleck'
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-Minority Lead-
er Charles A. Halleck's role in
helping draft a compromise civil
rights bill has arounsed resent-
ment among a sizable group of
House Republicans.
The dissatisfaction not only
throws into doubt the kind of
support the Republicans will give
the bill, it might threaten Hal-
leck's job of House GOP leader
unless steps are taken to counter
the resentment.
A group of 69 members-40 per
cent of the GOP membership-
attended a hastily called meeting
Thursday that bore all the signs
of a brewing revolt on the part of
conservatives.
The meeting wasn't planned un-
til Wednesday night and of 70
invited, all but one reportedly
showed up at 9 a.m. Thursday at

a hotel near the capitol. "We
could have gotten a lot more if
we had had time," said one of the
organizers, who asked not to be
named.
He said another meeting is be-
ing planned for the near future.
Another participant said the
meeting was designed to "open
lines of communication" between
Halleck and the rank and file
party members, and it is certain
Halleck got the message.
When the Indianan was instal-
led as GOP leader in a sudden
coup against Rep. Joseph W. Mar-
tin of Massachusetts five years
ago, the complaint was the same
-that communications had brok-
en down between the former party
leader and the troops.
At that time, Martin was not
only party leader but chairman of

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SHE'S READY
AND SO ARE WE
... ARE YOU?

~DAVE'S.
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3162 PACKARD
.,A.ANN ARBOR
Phone 665-8609
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, November 2
Sunday, November 3
PRIZES
Watch for opening of
Dave's Ski Hut on State Street

the policy committee that sup-
posedly set the GOP position on
pending legislation. When Halleck
took over, the two jobs were split.
Ever since, the leader has been
specifically charged with getting
policy committee clearance before

committing the part; to anything.
The chief complaint now is that
Halleck not only endorsed a civil
rights bill that goes further than
many Republicans like, but that
he did it without consulting the
policy committee.

5s Civil Rights Role Rouses Ire

ww"

HOMECOMING EVENTS
a~t
THE MICHIGAN JNION
4-6 P.M. COFFEE--1st floor lounge
(meet, greet friends and classmates)
6.8 P.M. DINNER-main dining room
(good selection for the discriminating diner)
10:30 P.M. til? DANCE-ballroom & lounge
(2 bands, music for all tastes)
ammaamaammee'Ifa

World News
Roundup.

11

CHRISTMAS FLIGHT to EUROPE
$339 ROUND TRIP
NEW YORK to PARIS Dec. 22
PARIS to NEW YORK Jan. 12
22 DAYS IN EUROPE
Call: Mr. K. Hans Mr. J, Shurman
NO 5-8394 NO 8-7720
Absolute Deadline - November 21

By The Associated Press
MOSCOW - The Soviet Union
launched an unmanned space ve-
hicle yesterday which it said was
capable of performing complicated
maneuvers on command from the
earth, A few hours later Soviet
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev
commented that he would look
with more warmth on the idea of
United States-Soviet space coop-
eration if international tensions
eased.
NEW YORK - Elsa Maxwell,
sharp-tongued critic, ardent friend
and full time hostess to the glit-
tering cream of international so-
ciety, died yesterday in New York
Hospital. She was 80 years old.
NEW YORK - Backing away
from an irregular early rise, the
stock market Friday ended with
a thoroughly scrambled pattern.
Trading was active. Dow-Jones
averages showed 30 industrials
down 1.50, 20 railroads up 1.10,
15 utilities down .07 and 65 stocks
up .06.
NATURE OF SCRIPTURES
DISCUSSED BY
NORTHSIDE PRES
In order to maintain its
identity as the community of
the redeemed, t h e Church
needs an objective link between
its contemporary self and, the
original Church. This link is
provided in the Scriptures,
which are the Divine witness
to the origin and development
of the Church. These docu-
ments were inspired by the
Holy Spirit during the period
of the early development of the
Church, and bear witness to
God's communcative acts, and
to the conditions under which
they were given. Thus, thel
Scriptures are the Church's
source of understanding the
basic theological scene as it
prepares for worship. The
Scriptures also provide the
Church with insights into God's
perspectives. They further in-
dicate the direction the Church
may take in fulfilling its mis-
sion and preserving its identity.
Is the Bible the verbally-in-
spired Word of God? Can the
Church conceive of its Scrip-
tures in other terms? How are
the Scriptures to be employed
by the Church?
Members of the Northside
Presbyterian Church, w h i c h
meets in the Phi Chi Fraternity,
2250 Fuller Road, believe that

CC)I'

7c)

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Meeting in the Ann Arbor Y.M.-Y.W.C.A
at 5th and Williams
Rev. Jesse Northweather, Pastor
Phone 668-9894
SUNDAY-
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m. Training Union.
7:30 p.m. Evening Worship.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Meeting in Room 528D
in basement of S.A.B.
Monday-7:00 to 8:00 p.m. Bible Study.
Thursday-5:10 to 5:40 p.m. Vesper Service.

r r!

CH~lU~kcRH
\SABr BAT H

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
John Koenig, Vicar
Saturday at 4:00: Homecoming Open House
after the Game.
Sunda yat 9:45 and 11:15: Services, with
sermon by Vicar Koenig, "Organziation
and Organism."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Classes.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta Supper.
Sunday at 6:45: Gamma Delta Program, Joe
McMahon tells about his work last sum-
mer with the Civil Rights Division of the
U.S. Dept. of Justice.
Wednesday at 10 p.m.: Midweek Devotion.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
John G. Makin, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all services-
Call NO 2-2756
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School.
7:00 p.m. Student Guild.
9:30 a.m. German Worship Service in Chapel.

'

SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon
Breakfast at Canterbury House
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY--
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
FR IDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy Communion.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 A.M. and 12 Noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.

WESLEY FOUNDATI'ON AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
663-5560
Minister-Hoover Rupert
Campus Minister-Eugene Ransom
Associate Campus Minister-Jean Robe
SUNDAY
Morning Worship at 9:00 and 11:15 a.m.
"Who Is My Neighbor?"-Bishop James
K. Mathews, Henry Martin Loud Lecturer.
10:15 a.m.-Student Seminar, Methodist So-
cial Creed, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Worship, and Program-Bishop
James K. Mathews.
TUESDAY
5:00-7:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations
Group. Supper and Program -- Speaker,
Brother David, member of the Roman
Catholic Benedictine Order.
8:30-11:00 p.m.--Open House-Miss Jean
Robe's apartment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Supper and Pro-
gram-Dr. Lawrence Oncley, "Religion in
a Nuclear Age," illustrated.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
For Transportation Call 2-2756
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty. Reading room hours are 10.00
A.M. to 5:00 P.M. daily, except Sunday
and Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street at South Forest Avenue
Dr. Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship Service and Communion.
11:00 a.m. Worship Service.
7:00 p.m. "Making the Liturgy Come to
Life."

I'

41

i

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH'
1501 West Liberty Street
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Adult Instruction Class and Adult Bible Class
9:45 a.m.
Church School-9:35 a.m.
6 -^1 _-_ 1 . A A . L -.-_

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
R A DTICrAK kADI IC rC,D

11

I

I

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