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November 02, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A"TITRDAV- WnVIP irR 2' 1442

THE MICHIC3AN BAILY )~1ATTT1uflaV fVrn ~ U 9I&

*.., i VvAIDL5.U , lilts

F

ECONOMIC CONFERENCE:
Propose Tax, Credit Changes

PROF. J. WERNETTE
... federal reserve

MATCH-UPS:
Establishes
Date Service
A local introduction service of-
fers people of all ages the oppor-
tunity to meet members of the
opposite sex whose backgrounds
and personalities are compatible
with their own.'
Every applicant is interviewed
by Frank C. McCormick, '55, direc-
tor of the service. After determin-
ing the interests, background, and
personality traits of a male appli-
cant, he feeds the information to
computers to find a woman of
complementary characteristics.
He then arranges for the gentle-
man to call and make a date.
Not Always Similar
"When matching personalities,
similarity is not always the best
policy. An extrovert is usually more
attracted to someone who is re-
served," McCormick noted.
He finds that "the people who
come to the service do so because
they are looking for someone who
is genuine-a person with whom
they can be themselves.".
The service is run on sound
psychological and scientific prin-
ciples, McCormick maintained.
The Ann Arbor Chamber of Com-
merce, the past director of the
Young Men's Christian Associa-
tion, and some clergymen have
shown approval of the program.
Students Participate
University students comprise
about half the clientele and 90 per
cent of the remaining number are
college educated.
McCormick stressed the need for
an aid in meeting "the right peo-
ple" on a large campus. He stress-
ed that the University should es-
tablish such a service.
"If each interested student pay-
ed a small fee at registration, the
University could afford to employ
the directors and equipment nec-
At a recent dance at Iowa S&%e
essary for an introduction service."
University, 500 men and women
were matched by computer pro-
cess.
'Satchmo' To Play
For Homecoming
Louis Armstrong, who has been
a leading figure in the world of
jazz for thirty years, will climax
Homecoming festivities with a
concert tonight at 8:30 p.m. in
Hill Auditorium.

The 11th annual Conference on
the Economic Outlook concluded
yesterday following a prediction
by Prof. Daniel B. Suits of the
economic department that the
passage of a tax cut this year
would result in the growth of
nearly 5 per cent in the physical
output in the United States in
1964.
Prof. J. Philip Wernette of the
business administration school as-
serted that hesitance by the Fed-
eral Reserve System about ex-
panding bank credit and the na-
tion's money supply is serving as a
brake on economic expansion.
Prof. Suits, director of the Re-
search Seminar in Quantitative
Economics, predicted in a speech
before 100 of the nation's top
economists that the tax cut would
guarantee another record automo-
bile year and reduce unemploy-
ment to a rate below any since
1957.
Economic Activity
He noted that the Michigan
Econometric Model is compiled
from 38 statistical equations that
relate various components of eco-
nomic activity.
For example, one equation re-
lates automobile demand to the
income received by consumers,
number of cars already on the
road, the rate at which cars are
being scrapped and liquid assets
held by consumers in bank de-
posits and government bonds.
Without tax cuts, according to
the University economists, the
physical production of goods and
services during 1964 will be nearly
three per cent higher than the
current.year.
Insufficient Growth
But this growth will be insuffi-
cient to- absorb the million new
entrants into the job market, and;
without tax reduction unemploy-
ment will increase, Suits pointed;
out.
Prof. Wernette commented that
the Federal Reserve System seems
dedicated to the proposition that
inflation is inimicable to contin-
ued prosperity.
"In the absence of more proof

PROF. DANIEL SUITS
...lauds tax-cut
than the repeated statements with-
out evidence that are so often
heard, this observer concludes that
the Federal Reserve is wrong in
this proposition, and therefore
looks at the wrong curve.
Rising Prices
"They seem to be looking at the
curve of rising commodity prices
rather than the curve of high un-
employment," he stated.
Wernette referred to Federal
Reserve Chairman Martin's "oft-
repeated rationalizations about the
necessity of achieving balance in
international payments and of
preventing price inflation in or-
der to have sustained prosperity."
From these statements, he con-
cluded, "We may suppose that the
Federal Reserve will be hesitant
about expanding bank credit and
the nation's money supply as long
as the final achievement of either
of these goals remains in doubt."
According to the University pre-
diction, the Gross National Pro-
duct will reach $606.8 billion,
without a tax cut. With a tax cut
it would hit a figure of $618.8 bil-
lion.

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
written in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2
Day Calendar
Football - U-M vs. Northwestern,
Homecoming: Mich. Stadium, 1:30 p.m.#
Cinema Guild-Hitchcock's "Spell-!
bound," plus short "Object Lesson":
Architecture Aud., 7 p.m. and 9 p.m.
Homecoming Concert - Louis Arm-
strong, jazz musician: Hill Aud.: 8:30
p.m.
Professional Theatre Program-Asso-
ciation of Producing Artists in Fry's "A
Phoenix Too Frequent," and Moliere's
"Scapin": Trueblood Aud., 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
School of Music: Due to illness, the
recital for Jane Olmstead, cellist. pre-
viously scheduled for Sat., Nov. 2, has
been cancelled.
The Institute for Student Interchange
of the East-West Center, Univ. of Ha-
waii, offers 100 scholarships to U.S.
citizens to pursue grad. programs in
t Asian area and Language Studies, An-
thropology, Asian and Pacific History,
Pacific Island Studies, Linguistics, Po-
litical Science and other fields relevant
to the Asian and Pacific area. The
scholarships are valued at $8500 for 21
months of tenure. Information and
application forms are available in the
Grad. Fellowship Office, Room 110,
Rackham Bldg.
Candidates for the Law School Ad-
mission Test, to be given on Nov. 9,
who have tickets assigning them to E.
Lansing may. if they wish, take the
test on this campus. Those who plan to
do so should register in the Evaluation
and Exam Division, Room 122 Rackham
Bldg., as soon as possible.
Undergraduate students now on cam-
pus, who do not have a housing com-
mitment for the spring semester, 1964,
may apply for housing in residence halls
at the Office of Residence Halls, 3011
Student Activities Bldg., beginning Nov.
1.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Pius XII Institute, Florence, Italy -
This is a graduate school of fine arts
for women. Courses in Art & Music
leading to the degrees: Master of Arts,
Master of Fine Arts, & Master of Music.
Several competitive scholarships are of-
fered, each valued at $1,000.
Fletcher Sch. of Law & Diplomacy,
Tufts, Univ.-This is a graduate School
of International Affairs administered
with the cooperation of Harvard. Of-
fers a comprehensive prog. of adv. study
in the fields of International Law, Or-
ganization, Diplomacy, World Politics,
International Econ., Trade & Finance,
Several scholarships & fellowships are
offered to men & women possessing
outstanding personal & academic quali-

fications.;Grants vary in amount from
tuition scholarships to fellowships bear-
ing stipends up to $3,500.
Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, Conn.-
Offering 2 programs of study for men
& women planning to teach in sec-
ondary schools: 1) 1-yr. prog. leading to
MA in Teaching. 2) 2-yr. prog. leading
to MAT degree & a Diploma of Further
Study. Fellowships ranging up to $2,-
000 for single students & $3,000 for
married men with dependents will be
awarded on basis of need. Apply by
March 1.
Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pa. - Graduate
School of Public & International Af-
fairs announces opportunities for MA
& PhD Programs in Public & Interna-
tionalService. Financial assistance is
granted on the basis of merit & need.
It ranges from $250 to $3,500.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
212 SAB-
Aerochem Research Labs., Inc., Prince-
ton, N.J.-Looking for Math majors to
work as calculators. Also seeking Phys-
ics, Chem., Kinetics, & Chem. Engrg.
majors to work as laboratory ass'ts.
Prefer students normally residing in
New Jersey.
New Jobs are arriving at Summer
Placement every day. Jobs for under-
graduates, graduates, foreign students,
& married couples.
State of Michigan Civil Service Exam
applications for Forest Fire Lookout B
and Park Ranger B are at the Summer
Placement Service. These applications
must be filled out & returned to Lans-
ing, Mich., by Nov. 15. You must be
18 yrs. old or older. Men only.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign interview schedule posted at 128-H
W. Engrg. for appointments with the
following:
NOV. 4 (a.m.)-
Jefferson Chemical Co., Inc., Port
NecesAsin&ConroeTexas-BS-
MS: ChE. BS: ME & Gen'l. Chem. R. &
D., Des. & Prod.
NOV. 4 (p.m.)-
Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge,
Mass.-MS-PhD: ChE. PhD: Commun.
Sci., EE & Nuclear. R. & D., Des.
NOV. 4-5-
McDonnell Aircraft Corp., St. Louis,
Mo.-AIl Degrees: AE & Astro., CE, EE,
EM, & ME. BS-MS: IE & Mat'ls. BS: E
Math. E Physics. Prof.: Applied Mech's.
MS-PhD: Met. R. & D., Des. & Prod.
Monsanto Chemical Co., All Monsanto
facilities (including Chemstrand)-All
Degrees: ChE & ME. BS-MS: EE & IE.
R. & D., Des., Prod. & Sales,
NOV. 4-
Sinclair Research, Inc., Petroleum.
Prod. Res., Tulsa, Okla.-MS-PhD: ChE.
PhD: EM. R. & D.
NOV. 4-8-
Standard Oil Co. of Calif. & Calif.
Research Corp., San Francisco & Los
Angeles areas, & San Joaquin Valley-
All Degrees: ChE. BS-MS: EE & ME.
MS: Met. R. & D., Des., Prod., Oil Re-
finery Tech. Service, Oil Field Engrg.
NOV. 4-
Universal Oil Products, Riverside, Ill.
and/or Des Plaines, Ill.-All Degrees:
ChE. R. & D., Des., Prod. & Sales.
City of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio-BS: CE
&EE. Dec. grads. Traffic Engrg.
NOV. 5-
American Electric Power Service Corp.,
AEP Co. System located in Midwest;
Am. Elec. Power Service Corp. located
in N.Y. City-BS, MS & Prof.: EE & ME.
R. & D., Des, Sys Planning & Synthe-
sis of Power Systems
NOV. 5 & 6-
The Bendix Corp., Mr. Canfield will
represent All Dlvs. not scheduled to be
on Campus & will also counsel all stu-
dents uncertain of Div. of greatest in-
terest - All Degrees: EE, EM, ME &
Physics. MS-PhD: Instrumentation:

Em plo ymnen t
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Placement
Office, 2200 Student Activities Bldg.,
during the following hours: Mon, thru
Fri., 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Dave Lowman,
Part-time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, Ext.
3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
1-Lab Aide (Female) to work full-
time. Must have some experience in
Histology and general laboratory
procedures.
1-Night attendant. Must be respon-
sible, older man to wvork 2 nights a
week for dorm.
1-Seamstress to work full-time doing
alterations for ladies store in Ar-
borland.
1-Pharmacy student to work part-
time in drug store. Very good ex-
perience. Must have car.
-Several students, both male and fe-
male are needed for psychological
subjects. Contact: Miss Kambas,
NO 3-1511, Ext. 7431.
1-Male-preferably grad student in
social sciences, business (marketing,
advertising), or related areas to as-
sist in survey research (analysis of
consumer surveys). Approx. 20 hrs.
per week-more if desired.

I

Students and Faculty
FEEL LIKE A HITCHCOCK
FOR HOMECOMING?
Call 662-8871
for further information

PhD: Commun. S. & Math. BS: E
Physics & Sci. Engrg. R. & D., Des.
NOV. 5-
Diamond Alkali Co., All locations
All Degrees: ChE. BS: EM, Mat'ls., ME {
& Science Engrg. R. & D., Des, Prod
Sales & Engrg. Training Prog.
Goodyear Aerospace Corp., Akron.
Ohio-All Degrees: AE & Astro., EE, Supper Club
Physics & Math. PhD: Org. Chem., ChE
& CE. R. & D., Des.}-
NOV. 5-6-
Hughes Aircraft Co., All locations-t
within 50 mileradius of Los Angeles,
Calif.-All Degrees: EE, Prof. & PhD:
AE & Astro, Instru., ME, Physics &
Math-(Applied), PhD: EM. Prof.: Ap- Mry e xtnl ar ecm
plied Mech's. ES: B Physics. R. & D., huI 1',. rt lm/s a m tnuc(l(Y) tde
Des., Field Engrg., Engrg. writing, Sys- aT ALAUlN A DPRE S
tAnalsis ECaysTO ALL ALUMNI AND PARENTS
temAgnav CFrandydinvites them to
NOV. 5 g vox Co., Fort Wayne, Ind. 662-2545 celebrate Homecoming b)
-BS-MS: EE. R. & D., Des. t
NOV. 5- Open Daily visiting the beaut1ful Waterfull-
National Steel Corp., Midwest Steel 1 1 a m. the5; PPer Club with a
Co., Portage, Ind.; Weirton Steel Co.-
BS: EE, IE, ME & Met. Des. & Prod. 2161 W. Stadium cave like atmosphere.
Blvd.
Part-Timne

I

-

4

U I

Order Your Subscription Today-
Phone NO 2-3241

U

r .r

Doir*(t,4

Name Kempe, Graikoski
To Botulism Committee

i

By STEVEN HALLER
Prof. Lloyd L. Kempe of the
engineering college noted last
night that he and John T. Grai-
koski, also of the engineering col-
lege, were named to Gov. George
Romney's 12-man botulism com-
mittee "as technical experts and
not as administrative personnel."
He emphasized that the purpose
of the committee would be to give
recommendations to fisheries and
processors, although the commit-
tee would have no power to impose
their suggestions through legisla-
tive action.
Romney formed the committee
last Wednesday to study the prob-
lems involved in controlling the
disease as well as to rebuild pub-
lic confidence in eating smoked
fish. Fishery representatives have
claimed that 20,000 employes of
that industry have been laid off
as a result of a ban on smoked
fish imposed by the Food and Drug
Administration.
Caused by Toxin
Seven deaths thus far have been
attributed to botulism, which is
caused by a toxin produced by a
microscopic organism. The organ-
ism thrives in larger marine crea-

tures, but poses no problem unless
the fish it is in is not adequately
processed.
Prof. Kempe added that the
committee has agreed on a set of
guidelines for evaluation of sani-
tation involved in processing fish.
These recommendations will be
passed on to the State Department
of Agriculture.
Graikoski noted that one con-
trol method that had been pro-
posed would entail heating the
fish to a certain temperature dur-
ing the processing operation and
then marketing it in a frozen
state. This would guard against
any botulism-causing organisms
being present once the fish was
sold.
Try To Control
He explained that the organ-
ism involved in Type E botulism
"has a peculiar predilection for
seafood. All outbreaks of the dis-
ease except one have been traced
to seafood of some type."
No research into the disease it-
self is currently being carried on
at the University and no "crash
program" is planned, Prof. Kempe
said.
Rather, workers here are con-
cerned with ways of controlling
the growth of the organism. Heat,
radiation, and the like are being
studied to see how their applica-
tion affects the toxin production
of the organism.
The committee has urged that
all Great Lakes smoked fish now
in the stores be destroyed. The
longer it remains on the shelves,
the greater is the danger that
the botulism organism will survive
and multiply.
Prof. Kempe noted that the fish
could be readily destroyed by
heating it to high temperatures
and burying it.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

HOMECOMING GUESTS
DON'T MISS THIS
HIT SUNDAY MATINEE!

Dbh;1A "SCAPIN" and
U'LMA~I F PHOENIX"
The Detroit News
Fry, Moliere Provide
an Evening of Laughs

N'

STARTS

0,4'

ANN ARBOR, Oct. 19 - A
double bill of fun, Christopher
Fry's "A Phoenix Too Fre-
quent" and Moliere's "Scapin,"
has been added to the Associa-
tion of Producing Artists (APA)
repertory fall season at the
Trueblood Auditorium.
The one-act productions have
a single result-an evening of
carefree laughter. It's refresh-
ing,
LINES HAVE PUNCH

RIB-TICKLERS
Presented by the University
I of Michigan's Professional The-
ater Program, the brilliantly-
acted shows are performances
of contrasting comic styles.
Both have been directed with
rib-tickling effects by Stephen
Porter.
The APA has two hits in one
show with these twin produc-
tions which will be performed
periodically throughout t he
season that ends Dec. 15.

TODAY

Entertainment Magic that will sweep you
into new realms of sight and sound!,

o .
-
WALT
X DISNEY'S
I A

) S
;, 11
I '

TRUEBLOOD THEATRE SAT. 8:30-SUN. 3:00 (MAT.)
Seats Now at Box Office

- i M21a
C4-q-

DIAL 8-6416
Continuous Today From 1 P.M.

SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS AVAILABLE
REGULAR (at 20% Discount) STUDENT (at 40% Discount)
Second Balc. front center . . . . 9.60 Second BoIc. front center .. .
Second BaIc. front side .......8.00 Second Boic. front side ...... .
MAIL ORDERS: SEND SELF ADDRESSED-STAMPED ENVELOPE AND CHECK TO:
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM, MENDELSSOHN THEATRE, Ann Arbor
OFFICE OPEN MON.-FRI. 10 A.M.-1 P.M. & 2-5 P.M.

7.20
6.00

y'

I

Congr. Disc. E & R Stud. Guild, After-
game Cider & Donuts, Nov. 2, 802 Mon-
roe.

1

I

x

I

4

JL

.
" 6 ,
"s

kasa
with
ATAI/(\IAIC/1i

Unitarian Student Group,
cancelled, Nov. 3.

Meeting

"High Gear
Humor-
Wholesale
Fun! Hilariousl"
-Winston, N.Y. Poud
'Bubbling
Satire I
Charmingly
flippant!"
He~rald Tibun~

NOW !

(;rani Pri7p Winner Sasn Sebastian, and EdinbumL.
Film Fe~stivals . Presented By EdwaMd Harrison

r,&v MICHIGIIM

Mati'nees-75c
Eves & Sun.-1 .00

The wonderful, wonderful story of
Mary Mary who said . . "Let's
not start something in a cab that
we can't finish on 44th Street."

.

N. [

[I 1K }L 1111\ K

I

I V I\V Y Y UI\I
and the Philadelphia Orchestra +
The original and complete program
Presented in SUPERSCOPE
FULL STEREOPHONIC SOUND \ - :

Coming Wednesday Only-"GREAT EXPECTATIONS"
I---------------inininmmininminminmmmmmminminminmminm;
4th ANNIVERSARY SALE
UNIVERSITY BIKE HOSPITAL
11Ad C C+-+-...C+..Kin,7/" Q "

Ik ''.,,_~

i

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